Constantinos Costis Daskalakis, Maxwell Fishelson, Noah Golowich
tl;dr: We prove a poly-logarithmic regret bound for no-regret learners in general-sum games.
We show that Optimistic Hedge -- a common variant of multiplicative-weights-updates with recency bias -- attains ${\rm poly}(\log T)$ regret in multi-player general-sum games. In particular, when every player of the game uses Optimistic Hedge to iteratively update her action in response to the history of play so far, then after $T$ rounds of interaction, each player experiences total regret that is ${\rm poly}(\log T)$. Our bound improves, exponentially, the $O(T^{1/2})$ regret attainable by standard no-regret learners in games, the $O(T^{1/4})$ regret attainable by no-regret learners with recency bias (Syrgkanis et al., NeurIPS 2015), and the $O(T^{1/6})$ bound that was recently shown for Optimistic Hedge in the special case of two-player games (Chen & Peng, NeurIPS 2020). A direct corollary of our bound is that Optimistic Hedge converges to coarse correlated equilibrium in general games at a rate of $\tilde{O}(1/T)$.
Lior Yariv, Jiatao Gu, Yoni Kasten, Yaron Lipman
tl;dr: Introducing volume rendering for neural implicit surfaces, allowing to learn high fidelity geometry from images.
Neural volume rendering became increasingly popular recently due to its success in synthesizing novel views of a scene from a sparse set of input images. So far, the geometry learned by neural volume rendering techniques was modeled using a generic density function. Furthermore, the geometry itself was extracted using an arbitrary level set of the density function leading to a noisy, often low fidelity reconstruction. The goal of this paper is to improve geometry representation and reconstruction in neural volume rendering. We achieve that by modeling the volume density as a function of the geometry. This is in contrast to previous work modeling the geometry as a function of the volume density. In more detail, we define the volume density function as Laplace's cumulative distribution function (CDF) applied to a signed distance function (SDF) representation. This simple density representation has three benefits: (i) it provides a useful inductive bias to the geometry learned in the neural volume rendering process; (ii) it facilitates a bound on the opacity approximation error, leading to an accurate sampling of the viewing ray. Accurate sampling is important to provide a precise coupling of geometry and radiance; and (iii) it allows efficient unsupervised disentanglement of shape and appearance in volume rendering. Applying this new density representation to challenging scene multiview datasets produced high quality geometry reconstructions, outperforming relevant baselines. Furthermore, switching shape and appearance between scenes is possible due to the disentanglement of the two.
Zhenyu Liao, Michael W. Mahoney
tl;dr: Precise asymptotic characterization of a family of (convex and non-convex) generalized GLMs, including the (limiting) eigenvalue distribution, the behavior of isolated eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Given an optimization problem, the Hessian matrix and its eigenspectrum can be used in many ways, ranging from designing more efficient second-order algorithms to performing model analysis and regression diagnostics. When nonlinear models and non-convex problems are considered, strong simplifying assumptions are often made to make Hessian spectral analysis more tractable. This leads to the question of how relevant the conclusions of such analyses are for realistic nonlinear models. In this paper, we exploit tools from random matrix theory to make a *precise* characterization of the Hessian eigenspectra for a broad family of nonlinear models that extends the classical generalized linear models, without relying on strong simplifying assumptions used previously. We show that, depending on the data properties, the nonlinear response model, and the loss function, the Hessian can have *qualitatively* different spectral behaviors: of bounded or unbounded support, with single- or multi-bulk, and with isolated eigenvalues on the left- or right-hand side of the main eigenvalue bulk. By focusing on such a simple but nontrivial model, our analysis takes a step forward to unveil the theoretical origin of many visually striking features observed in more realistic machine learning models.
Yin Tat Lee, Ruoqi Shen, Kevin Tian
tl;dr: We give lower bounds showing the current analyses of MALA for sampling well-conditioned distributions are nearly-tight, and that HMC incurs a polynomial dimension dependence for any number of steps.
We give lower bounds on the performance of two of the most popular sampling methods in practice, the Metropolis-adjusted Langevin algorithm (MALA) and multi-step Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) with a leapfrog integrator, when applied to well-conditioned distributions. Our main result is a nearly-tight lower bound of $\widetilde{\Omega}(\kappa d)$ on the mixing time of MALA from an exponentially warm start, matching a line of algorithmic results \cite{DwivediCW018, ChenDWY19, LeeST20a} up to logarithmic factors and answering an open question of \cite{ChewiLACGR20}. We also show that a polynomial dependence on dimension is necessary for the relaxation time of HMC under any number of leapfrog steps, and bound the gains achievable by changing the step count. Our HMC analysis draws upon a novel connection between leapfrog integration and Chebyshev polynomials, which may be of independent interest.
Ilias Diakonikolas, Daniel Kane, Daniel Kongsgaard, Jerry Li, Kevin Tian
tl;dr: We give a state-of-the-art algorithm for list-decodable mean estimation, the robust generalization of learning mixture models, attaining optimal error in polylogarithmic calls to approximate PCA.
Robust statistics has traditionally focused on designing estimators tolerant to a minority of contaminated data. {\em List-decodable learning}~\cite{CharikarSV17} studies the more challenging regime where only a minority $\tfrac 1 k$ fraction of the dataset, $k \geq 2$, is drawn from the distribution of interest, and no assumptions are made on the remaining data. We study the fundamental task of list-decodable mean estimation in high dimensions. Our main result is a new algorithm for bounded covariance distributions with optimal sample complexity and near-optimal error guarantee, running in {\em nearly-PCA time}. Assuming the ground truth distribution on $\mathbb{R}^d$ has identity-bounded covariance, our algorithm outputs $O(k)$ candidate means, one of which is within distance $O(\sqrt{k\log k})$ from the truth. Our algorithm runs in time $\widetilde{O}(ndk)$, where $n$ is the dataset size. This runtime nearly matches the cost of performing $k$-PCA on the data, a natural bottleneck of known algorithms for (very) special cases of our problem, such as clustering well-separated mixtures. Prior to our work, the fastest runtimes were $\widetilde{O}(n^2 d k^2)$~\cite{DiakonikolasKK20}, and $\widetilde{O}(nd k^C)$ \cite{CherapanamjeriMY20} for an unspecified constant $C \geq 6$. Our approach builds on a novel soft downweighting method we term SIFT, arguably the simplest known polynomial-time mean estimator in the list-decodable setting. To develop our fast algorithms, we boost the computational cost of SIFT via a careful ``win-win-win'' analysis of an approximate Ky Fan matrix multiplicative weights procedure we develop, which may be of independent interest.
Zhenyu Huang, Guocheng Niu, Xiao Liu, Wenbiao Ding, Xinyan Xiao, hua wu, Xi Peng
Cross-modal matching, which aims to establish the correspondence between two different modalities, is fundamental to a variety of tasks such as cross-modal retrieval and vision-and-language understanding. Although a huge number of cross-modal matching methods have been proposed and achieved remarkable progress in recent years, almost all of these methods implicitly assume that the multimodal training data are correctly aligned. In practice, however, such an assumption is extremely expensive even impossible to satisfy. Based on this observation, we reveal and study a latent and challenging direction in cross-modal matching, named noisy correspondence, which could be regarded as a new paradigm of noisy labels. Different from the traditional noisy labels which mainly refer to the errors in category labels, our noisy correspondence refers to the mismatch paired samples. To solve this new problem, we propose a novel method for learning with noisy correspondence, named Noisy Correspondence Rectifier (NCR). In brief, NCR divides the data into clean and noisy partitions based on the memorization effect of neural networks and then rectifies the correspondence via an adaptive prediction model in a co-teaching manner. To verify the effectiveness of our method, we conduct experiments by using the image-text matching as a showcase. Extensive experiments on Flickr30K, MS-COCO, and Conceptual Captions verify the effectiveness of our method. The code could be accessed from www.pengxi.me .
Tero Karras, Miika Aittala, Samuli Laine, Erik Härkönen, Janne Hellsten, Jaakko Lehtinen, Timo Aila
tl;dr: Careless signal processing causes "texture sticking" artifacts in GANs; our redesign solves them and dramatically improves visual quality under animation.
We observe that despite their hierarchical convolutional nature, the synthesis process of typical generative adversarial networks depends on absolute pixel coordinates in an unhealthy manner. This manifests itself as, e.g., detail appearing to be glued to image coordinates instead of the surfaces of depicted objects. We trace the root cause to careless signal processing that causes aliasing in the generator network. Interpreting all signals in the network as continuous, we derive generally applicable, small architectural changes that guarantee that unwanted information cannot leak into the hierarchical synthesis process. The resulting networks match the FID of StyleGAN2 but differ dramatically in their internal representations, and they are fully equivariant to translation and rotation even at subpixel scales. Our results pave the way for generative models better suited for video and animation.
Simone Parisi, Victoria Dean, Deepak Pathak, Abhinav Gupta
tl;dr: We propose a framework for combining agent-centric and environment-centric exploration. Key points: definition of a new intrinsic reward; exploration policy learning based on these rewards; transfer of the exploration policy to solve new tasks.
Common approaches for task-agnostic exploration learn tabula-rasa --the agent assumes isolated environments and no prior knowledge or experience. However, in the real world, agents learn in many environments and always come with prior experiences as they explore new ones. Exploration is a lifelong process. In this paper, we propose a paradigm change in the formulation and evaluation of task-agnostic exploration. In this setup, the agent first learns to explore across many environments without any extrinsic goal in a task-agnostic manner. Later on, the agent effectively transfers the learned exploration policy to better explore new environments when solving tasks. In this context, we evaluate several baseline exploration strategies and present a simple yet effective approach to learning task-agnostic exploration policies. Our key idea is that there are two components of exploration: (1) an agent-centric component encouraging exploration of unseen parts of the environment based on an agent’s belief; (2) an environment-centric component encouraging exploration of inherently interesting objects. We show that our formulation is effective and provides the most consistent exploration across several training-testing environment pairs. We also introduce benchmarks and metrics for evaluating task-agnostic exploration strategies. The source code is available at https://github.com/sparisi/cbet/.
Vladimir Braverman, Shaofeng H.-C. Jiang, Robert Krauthgamer, Xuan Wu
tl;dr: We provide the first coreset and near-linear time PTAS for clustering with (multiple) missing values
We provide the first coreset for clustering points in $\mathbb{R}^d$ that have multiple missing values (coordinates). Previous coreset constructions only allow one missing coordinate. The challenge in this setting is that objective functions, like \kMeans, are evaluated only on the set of available (non-missing) coordinates, which varies across points. Recall that an $\epsilon$-coreset of a large dataset is a small proxy, usually a reweighted subset of points, that $(1+\epsilon)$-approximates the clustering objective for every possible center set. Our coresets for $k$-Means and $k$-Median clustering have size $(jk)^{O(\min(j,k))} (\epsilon^{-1} d \log n)^2$, where $n$ is the number of data points, $d$ is the dimension and $j$ is the maximum number of missing coordinates for each data point. We further design an algorithm to construct these coresets in near-linear time, and consequently improve a recent quadratic-time PTAS for $k$-Means with missing values [Eiben et al., SODA 2021] to near-linear time. We validate our coreset construction, which is based on importance sampling and is easy to implement, on various real data sets. Our coreset exhibits a flexible tradeoff between coreset size and accuracy, and generally outperforms the uniform-sampling baseline. Furthermore, it significantly speeds up a Lloyd's-style heuristic for $k$-Means with missing values.
Vivek Farias, Andrew A Li, Tianyi Peng
tl;dr: An optimal estimator for causal inference on panel data with general treatment patterns.
The problem of causal inference with panel data is a central econometric question. The following is a fundamental version of this problem: Let $M^*$ be a low rank matrix and $E$ be a zero-mean noise matrix. For a `treatment' matrix $Z$ with entries in $\{0,1\}$ we observe the matrix $O$ with entries $O_{ij} := M^*_{ij} + E_{ij} + \mathcal{T}_{ij} Z_{ij}$ where $\mathcal{T}_{ij} $ are unknown, heterogenous treatment effects. The problem requires we estimate the average treatment effect $\tau^* := \sum_{ij} \mathcal{T}_{ij} Z_{ij} / \sum_{ij} Z_{ij}$. The synthetic control paradigm provides an approach to estimating $\tau^*$ when $Z$ places support on a single row. This paper extends that framework to allow rate-optimal recovery of $\tau^*$ for general $Z$, thus broadly expanding its applicability. Our guarantees are the first of their type in this general setting. Computational experiments on synthetic and real-world data show a substantial advantage over competing estimators.
Songyou Peng, Chiyu Max Jiang, Yiyi Liao, Michael Niemeyer, Marc Pollefeys, Andreas Geiger
tl;dr: SAP is a differentiable version of classic Poisson surface reconstruction, and an interpretable shape representation that efficiently connects points with HQ watertight meshes
In recent years, neural implicit representations gained popularity in 3D reconstruction due to their expressiveness and flexibility. However, the implicit nature of neural implicit representations results in slow inference times and requires careful initialization. In this paper, we revisit the classic yet ubiquitous point cloud representation and introduce a differentiable point-to-mesh layer using a differentiable formulation of Poisson Surface Reconstruction (PSR) which allows for a GPU-accelerated fast solution of the indicator function given an oriented point cloud. The differentiable PSR layer allows us to efficiently and differentiably bridge the explicit 3D point representation with the 3D mesh via the implicit indicator field, enabling end-to-end optimization of surface reconstruction metrics such as Chamfer distance. This duality between points and meshes hence allows us to represent shapes as oriented point clouds, which are explicit, lightweight and expressive. Compared to neural implicit representations, our Shape-As-Points (SAP) model is more interpretable, lightweight, and accelerates inference time by one order of magnitude. Compared to other explicit representations such as points, patches, and meshes, SAP produces topology-agnostic, watertight manifold surfaces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of SAP on the task of surface reconstruction from unoriented point clouds and learning-based reconstruction.
Zachary Teed, Jia Deng
We introduce DROID-SLAM, a new deep learning based SLAM system. DROID-SLAM consists of recurrent iterative updates of camera pose and pixelwise depth through a Dense Bundle Adjustment layer. DROID-SLAM is accurate, achieving large improvements over prior work, and robust, suffering from substantially fewer catastrophic failures. Despite training on monocular video, it can leverage stereo or RGB-D video to achieve improved performance at test time. The URL to our open source code is https://github.com/princeton-vl/DROID-SLAM.
Divyansh Garg, Shuvam Chakraborty, Chris Cundy, Jiaming Song, Stefano Ermon
tl;dr: Introduce a novel framework for learning soft-Q functions for IL; build a method that is performant even with very sparse expert data, and scales to complex image-based environments
In many sequential decision-making problems (e.g., robotics control, game playing, sequential prediction), human or expert data is available containing useful information about the task. However, imitation learning (IL) from a small amount of expert data can be challenging in high-dimensional environments with complex dynamics. Behavioral cloning is a simple method that is widely used due to its simplicity of implementation and stable convergence but doesn't utilize any information involving the environment’s dynamics. Many existing methods that exploit dynamics information are difficult to train in practice due to an adversarial optimization process over reward and policy approximators or biased, high variance gradient estimators. We introduce a method for dynamics-aware IL which avoids adversarial training by learning a single Q-function, implicitly representing both reward and policy. On standard benchmarks, the implicitly learned rewards show a high positive correlation with the ground-truth rewards, illustrating our method can also be used for inverse reinforcement learning (IRL). Our method, Inverse soft-Q learning (IQ-Learn) obtains state-of-the-art results in offline and online imitation learning settings, significantly outperforming existing methods both in the number of required environment interactions and scalability in high-dimensional spaces, often by more than 3x.
Guodong Zhang, Kyle Hsu, Jianing Li, Chelsea Finn, Roger Baker Grosse
Annealed importance sampling (AIS) and related algorithms are highly effective tools for marginal likelihood estimation, but are not fully differentiable due to the use of Metropolis-Hastings correction steps. Differentiability is a desirable property as it would admit the possibility of optimizing marginal likelihood as an objective using gradient-based methods. To this end, we propose Differentiable AIS (DAIS), a variant of AIS which ensures differentiability by abandoning the Metropolis-Hastings corrections. As a further advantage, DAIS allows for mini-batch gradients. We provide a detailed convergence analysis for Bayesian linear regression which goes beyond previous analyses by explicitly accounting for the sampler not having reached equilibrium. Using this analysis, we prove that DAIS is consistent in the full-batch setting and provide a sublinear convergence rate. Furthermore, motivated by the problem of learning from large-scale datasets, we study a stochastic variant of DAIS that uses mini-batch gradients. Surprisingly, stochastic DAIS can be arbitrarily bad due to a fundamental incompatibility between the goals of last-iterate convergence to the posterior and elimination of the accumulated stochastic error. This is in stark contrast with other settings such as gradient-based optimization and Langevin dynamics, where the effect of gradient noise can be washed out by taking smaller steps. This indicates that annealing-based marginal likelihood estimation with stochastic gradients may require new ideas.
Alexander Meulemans, Matilde Tristany Farinha, Javier Garcia Ordonez, Pau Vilimelis Aceituno, Joao Sacramento, Benjamin F Grewe
tl;dr: We introduce Deep Feedback Control, a new bio-plausible learning method that uses a feedback controller to drive a deep neural network to match a desired output target and which approximates Gauss-Newton optimization.
The success of deep learning sparked interest in whether the brain learns by using similar techniques for assigning credit to each synaptic weight for its contribution to the network output. However, the majority of current attempts at biologically-plausible learning methods are either non-local in time, require highly specific connectivity motifs, or have no clear link to any known mathematical optimization method. Here, we introduce Deep Feedback Control (DFC), a new learning method that uses a feedback controller to drive a deep neural network to match a desired output target and whose control signal can be used for credit assignment. The resulting learning rule is fully local in space and time and approximates Gauss-Newton optimization for a wide range of feedback connectivity patterns. To further underline its biological plausibility, we relate DFC to a multi-compartment model of cortical pyramidal neurons with a local voltage-dependent synaptic plasticity rule, consistent with recent theories of dendritic processing. By combining dynamical system theory with mathematical optimization theory, we provide a strong theoretical foundation for DFC that we corroborate with detailed results on toy experiments and standard computer-vision benchmarks.
Paul Haider, Benjamin Ellenberger, Laura Kriener, Jakob Jordan, Walter Senn, Mihai A. Petrovici
tl;dr: A unified theory of neuronal dynamics and synaptic plasticity that solves the relaxation problem in networks with slow components.
The response time of physical computational elements is finite, and neurons are no exception. In hierarchical models of cortical networks each layer thus introduces a response lag. This inherent property of physical dynamical systems results in delayed processing of stimuli and causes a timing mismatch between network output and instructive signals, thus afflicting not only inference, but also learning. We introduce Latent Equilibrium, a new framework for inference and learning in networks of slow components which avoids these issues by harnessing the ability of biological neurons to phase-advance their output with respect to their membrane potential. This principle enables quasi-instantaneous inference independent of network depth and avoids the need for phased plasticity or computationally expensive network relaxation phases. We jointly derive disentangled neuron and synapse dynamics from a prospective energy function that depends on a network's generalized position and momentum. The resulting model can be interpreted as a biologically plausible approximation of error backpropagation in deep cortical networks with continuous-time, leaky neuronal dynamics and continuously active, local plasticity. We demonstrate successful learning of standard benchmark datasets, achieving competitive performance using both fully-connected and convolutional architectures, and show how our principle can be applied to detailed models of cortical microcircuitry. Furthermore, we study the robustness of our model to spatio-temporal substrate imperfections to demonstrate its feasibility for physical realization, be it in vivo or in silico.
Yuanhao Wang, Ruosong Wang, Sham M. Kakade
A fundamental question in the theory of reinforcement learning is: suppose the optimal $Q$-function lies in the linear span of a given $d$ dimensional feature mapping, is sample-efficient reinforcement learning (RL) possible? The recent and remarkable result of Weisz et al. (2020) resolves this question in the negative, providing an exponential (in $d$) sample size lower bound, which holds even if the agent has access to a generative model of the environment. One may hope that such a lower can be circumvented with an even stronger assumption that there is a \emph{constant gap} between the optimal $Q$-value of the best action and that of the second-best action (for all states); indeed, the construction in Weisz et al. (2020) relies on having an exponentially small gap. This work resolves this subsequent question, showing that an exponential sample complexity lower bound still holds even if a constant gap is assumed. Perhaps surprisingly, this result implies an exponential separation between the online RL setting and the generative model setting, where sample-efficient RL is in fact possible in the latter setting with a constant gap. Complementing our negative hardness result, we give two positive results showing that provably sample-efficient RL is possible either under an additional low-variance assumption or under a novel hypercontractivity assumption.
Benjamin Eysenbach, Sergey Levine, Ruslan Salakhutdinov
tl;dr: A method for solving RL tasks using examples of desired outcomes, rather than reward functions, that significantly outperforms prior methods.
Reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms assume that users specify tasks by manually writing down a reward function. However, this process can be laborious and demands considerable technical expertise. Can we devise RL algorithms that instead enable users to specify tasks simply by providing examples of successful outcomes? In this paper, we derive a control algorithm that maximizes the future probability of these successful outcome examples. Prior work has approached similar problems with a two-stage process, first learning a reward function and then optimizing this reward function using another reinforcement learning algorithm. In contrast, our method directly learns a value function from transitions and successful outcomes, without learning this intermediate reward function. Our method therefore requires fewer hyperparameters to tune and lines of code to debug. We show that our method satisfies a new data-driven Bellman equation, where examples take the place of the typical reward function term. Experiments show that our approach outperforms prior methods that learn explicit reward functions.
David Ding, Felix Hill, Adam Santoro, Malcolm Reynolds, Matthew Botvinick
tl;dr: A general framework of attention over learned object embeddings outperforms task-specific models on complex visual reasoning tasks thought to be too challenging for general models.
Neural networks have achieved success in a wide array of perceptual tasks but often fail at tasks involving both perception and higher-level reasoning. On these more challenging tasks, bespoke approaches (such as modular symbolic components, independent dynamics models or semantic parsers) targeted towards that specific type of task have typically performed better. The downside to these targeted approaches, however, is that they can be more brittle than general-purpose neural networks, requiring significant modification or even redesign according to the particular task at hand. Here, we propose a more general neural-network-based approach to dynamic visual reasoning problems that obtains state-of-the-art performance on three different domains, in each case outperforming bespoke modular approaches tailored specifically to the task. Our method relies on learned object-centric representations, self-attention and self-supervised dynamics learning, and all three elements together are required for strong performance to emerge. The success of this combination suggests that there may be no need to trade off flexibility for performance on problems involving spatio-temporal or causal-style reasoning. With the right soft biases and learning objectives in a neural network we may be able to attain the best of both worlds.
Yulun Zhang, Huan Wang, Can Qin, Yun Fu
tl;dr: Optimize image SR networks with network pruning simultaneously and achieve SOTA results
Lightweight image super-resolution (SR) networks have obtained promising results with moderate model size. Many SR methods have focused on designing lightweight architectures, which neglect to further reduce the redundancy of network parameters. On the other hand, model compression techniques, like neural architecture search and knowledge distillation, typically consume considerable memory and computation resources. In contrast, network pruning is a cheap and effective model compression technique. However, it is hard to be applied to SR networks directly, because filter pruning for residual blocks is well-known tricky. To address the above issues, we propose aligned structured sparsity learning (ASSL), which introduces a weight normalization layer and applies $L_2$ regularization to the scale parameters for sparsity. To align the pruned locations across different layers, we propose a \emph{sparsity structure alignment} penalty term, which minimizes the norm of soft mask gram matrix. We apply aligned structured sparsity learning strategy to train efficient image SR network, named as ASSLN, with smaller model size and lower computation than state-of-the-art methods. We conduct extensive comparisons with lightweight SR networks. Our ASSLN achieves superior performance gains over recent methods quantitatively and visually.
Guy Kornowski, Ohad Shamir
tl;dr: We theoretically study nonsmooth nonconvex optimization from an oracle complexity viewpoint, proving both hardness results and tradeoffs between computational efficiency and performance
It is well-known that given a smooth, bounded-from-below, and possibly nonconvex function, standard gradient-based methods can find $\epsilon$-stationary points (with gradient norm less than $\epsilon$) in $\mathcal{O}(1/\epsilon^2)$ iterations. However, many important nonconvex optimization problems, such as those associated with training modern neural networks, are inherently not smooth, making these results inapplicable. In this paper, we study nonsmooth nonconvex optimization from an oracle complexity viewpoint, where the algorithm is assumed to be given access only to local information about the function at various points. We provide two main results (under mild assumptions): First, we consider the problem of getting \emph{near} $\epsilon$-stationary points. This is perhaps the most natural relaxation of \emph{finding} $\epsilon$-stationary points, which is impossible in the nonsmooth nonconvex case. We prove that this relaxed goal cannot be achieved efficiently, for any distance and $\epsilon$ smaller than some constants. Our second result deals with the possibility of tackling nonsmooth nonconvex optimization by reduction to smooth optimization: Namely, applying smooth optimization methods on a smooth approximation of the objective function. For this approach, we prove an inherent trade-off between oracle complexity and smoothness: On the one hand, smoothing a nonsmooth nonconvex function can be done very efficiently (e.g., by randomized smoothing), but with dimension-dependent factors in the smoothness parameter, which can strongly affect iteration complexity when plugging into standard smooth optimization methods. On the other hand, these dimension factors can be eliminated with suitable smoothing methods, but only by making the oracle complexity of the smoothing process exponentially large.
Krishna Pillutla, Swabha Swayamdipta, Rowan Zellers, John Thickstun, Sean Welleck, Yejin Choi, Zaid Harchaoui
tl;dr: A comparison measure for open-ended text generation by directly comparing the distribution of neural machine-generated text to that of human-written text.
As major progress is made in open-ended text generation, measuring how close machine-generated text is to human language remains a critical open problem. We introduce Mauve, a comparison measure for open-ended text generation, which directly compares the learnt distribution from a text generation model to the distribution of human-written text using divergence frontiers. Mauve scales up to modern text generation models by computing information divergences in a quantized embedding space. Through an extensive empirical study on three open-ended generation tasks, we find that Mauve identifies known properties of generated text, scales naturally with model size, and correlates with human judgments, with fewer restrictions than existing distributional evaluation metrics.
Meena Jagadeesan, Alexander Wei, Yixin Wang, Michael Jordan, Jacob Steinhardt
tl;dr: We develop a framework and algorithms for learning efficient market outcomes when preferences are uncertain.
Large-scale, two-sided matching platforms must find market outcomes that align with user preferences while simultaneously learning these preferences from data. But since preferences are inherently uncertain during learning, the classical notion of stability (Gale and Shapley, 1962; Shapley and Shubik, 1971) is unattainable in these settings. To bridge this gap, we develop a framework and algorithms for learning stable market outcomes under uncertainty. Our primary setting is matching with transferable utilities, where the platform both matches agents and sets monetary transfers between them. We design an incentive-aware learning objective that captures the distance of a market outcome from equilibrium. Using this objective, we analyze the complexity of learning as a function of preference structure, casting learning as a stochastic multi-armed bandit problem. Algorithmically, we show that "optimism in the face of uncertainty," the principle underlying many bandit algorithms, applies to a primal-dual formulation of matching with transfers and leads to near-optimal regret bounds. Our work takes a first step toward elucidating when and how stable matchings arise in large, data-driven marketplaces.
Camille E. Rullán Buxó, Cristina Savin
tl;dr: We describe a spiking neural circuit that performs approximately optimal decision making and analyze its computational and representational properties.
Many features of human and animal behavior can be understood in the framework of Bayesian inference and optimal decision making, but the biological substrate of such processes is not fully understood. Neural sampling provides a flexible code for probabilistic inference in high dimensions and explains key features of sensory responses under experimental manipulations of uncertainty. However, since it encodes uncertainty implicitly, across time and neurons, it remains unclear how such representations can be used for decision making. Here we propose a spiking network model that maps neural samples of a task-specific marginal distribution into an instantaneous representation of uncertainty via a procedure inspired by online kernel density estimation, so that its output can be readily used for decision making. Our model is consistent with experimental results at the level of single neurons and populations, and makes predictions for how neural responses and decisions could be modulated by uncertainty and prior biases. More generally, our work brings together conflicting perspectives on probabilistic brain computation.
Tianyi Chen, Yuejiao Sun, Wotao Yin
tl;dr: Our results explain why simple SGD-type algorithms all work very well in practical bilevel problems without the need for further modifications.
Stochastic nested optimization, including stochastic compositional, min-max, and bilevel optimization, is gaining popularity in many machine learning applications. While the three problems share a nested structure, existing works often treat them separately, thus developing problem-specific algorithms and analyses. Among various exciting developments, simple SGD-type updates (potentially on multiple variables) are still prevalent in solving this class of nested problems, but they are believed to have a slower convergence rate than non-nested problems. This paper unifies several SGD-type updates for stochastic nested problems into a single SGD approach that we term ALternating Stochastic gradient dEscenT (ALSET) method. By leveraging the hidden smoothness of the problem, this paper presents a tighter analysis of ALSET for stochastic nested problems. Under the new analysis, to achieve an $\epsilon$-stationary point of the nested problem, it requires ${\cal O}(\epsilon^{-2})$ samples in total. Under certain regularity conditions, applying our results to stochastic compositional, min-max, and reinforcement learning problems either improves or matches the best-known sample complexity in the respective cases. Our results explain why simple SGD-type algorithms in stochastic nested problems all work very well in practice without the need for further modifications.
Yixing Xu, Kai Han, Chang Xu, Yehui Tang, Chunjing Xu, Yunhe Wang
tl;dr: Using sine module and noise adaptation module to approximate sign function in BNN.
Binary neural networks (BNNs) represent original full-precision weights and activations into 1-bit with sign function. Since the gradient of the conventional sign function is almost zero everywhere which cannot be used for back-propagation, several attempts have been proposed to alleviate the optimization difficulty by using approximate gradient. However, those approximations corrupt the main direction of factual gradient. To this end, we propose to estimate the gradient of sign function in the Fourier frequency domain using the combination of sine functions for training BNNs, namely frequency domain approximation (FDA). The proposed approach does not affect the low-frequency information of the original sign function which occupies most of the overall energy, and high-frequency coefficients will be ignored to avoid the huge computational overhead. In addition, we embed a noise adaptation module into the training phase to compensate the approximation error. The experiments on several benchmark datasets and neural architectures illustrate that the binary network learned using our method achieves the state-of-the-art accuracy. Code will be available at https://gitee.com/mindspore/models/tree/master/research/cv/FDA-BNN.
Marine Le Morvan, Julie Josse, Erwan Scornet, Gael Varoquaux
How to learn a good predictor on data with missing values? Most efforts focus on first imputing as well as possible and second learning on the completed data to predict the outcome. Yet, this widespread practice has no theoretical grounding. Here we show that for almost all imputation functions, an impute-then-regress procedure with a powerful learner is Bayes optimal. This result holds for all missing-values mechanisms, in contrast with the classic statistical results that require missing-at-random settings to use imputation in probabilistic modeling. Moreover, it implies that perfect conditional imputation is not needed for good prediction asymptotically. In fact, we show that on perfectly imputed data the best regression function will generally be discontinuous, which makes it hard to learn. Crafting instead the imputation so as to leave the regression function unchanged simply shifts the problem to learning discontinuous imputations. Rather, we suggest that it is easier to learn imputation and regression jointly. We propose such a procedure, adapting NeuMiss, a neural network capturing the conditional links across observed and unobserved variables whatever the missing-value pattern. Our experiments confirm that joint imputation and regression through NeuMiss is better than various two step procedures in a finite-sample regime.
Fangyun Wei, Yue Gao, Zhirong Wu, Han Hu, Stephen Lin
tl;dr: We introduce a self-supervised pretraining framework for object detection.
Image-level contrastive representation learning has proven to be highly effective as a generic model for transfer learning. Such generality for transfer learning, however, sacrifices specificity if we are interested in a certain downstream task. We argue that this could be sub-optimal and thus advocate a design principle which encourages alignment between the self-supervised pretext task and the downstream task. In this paper, we follow this principle with a pretraining method specifically designed for the task of object detection. We attain alignment in the following three aspects: 1) object-level representations are introduced via selective search bounding boxes as object proposals; 2) the pretraining network architecture incorporates the same dedicated modules used in the detection pipeline (e.g. FPN); 3) the pretraining is equipped with object detection properties such as object-level translation invariance and scale invariance. Our method, called Selective Object COntrastive learning (SoCo), achieves state-of-the-art results for transfer performance on COCO detection using a Mask R-CNN framework. Code is available at https://github.com/hologerry/SoCo.
Sebastien Bubeck, Mark Sellke
Classically, data interpolation with a parametrized model class is possible as long as the number of parameters is larger than the number of equations to be satisfied. A puzzling phenomenon in the current practice of deep learning is that models are trained with many more parameters than what this classical theory would suggest. We propose a theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. We prove that for a broad class of data distributions and model classes, overparametrization is {\em necessary} if one wants to interpolate the data {\em smoothly}. Namely we show that {\em smooth} interpolation requires $d$ times more parameters than mere interpolation, where $d$ is the ambient data dimension. We prove this universal law of robustness for any smoothly parametrized function class with polynomial size weights, and any covariate distribution verifying isoperimetry. In the case of two-layers neural networks and Gaussian covariates, this law was conjectured in prior work by Bubeck, Li and Nagaraj. We also give an interpretation of our result as an improved generalization bound for model classes consisting of smooth functions.
Ilias Diakonikolas, Daniel Kane, Ankit Pensia, Thanasis Pittas, Alistair Stewart
tl;dr: We prove a superpolynomial statistical query lower bound for the problem of learning the regression vector of a Gaussian linear model when outliers constitute the majority of the dataset.
We study the problem of list-decodable linear regression, where an adversary can corrupt a majority of the examples. Specifically, we are given a set $T$ of labeled examples $(x, y) \in \mathbb{R}^d \times \mathbb{R}$ and a parameter $0< \alpha <1/2$ such that an $\alpha$-fraction of the points in $T$ are i.i.d. samples from a linear regression model with Gaussian covariates, and the remaining $(1-\alpha)$-fraction of the points are drawn from an arbitrary noise distribution. The goal is to output a small list of hypothesis vectors such that at least one of them is close to the target regression vector. Our main result is a Statistical Query (SQ) lower bound of $d^{\mathrm{poly}(1/\alpha)}$ for this problem. Our SQ lower bound qualitatively matches the performance of previously developed algorithms, providing evidence that current upper bounds for this task are nearly best possible.
David Brandfonbrener, William F Whitney, Rajesh Ranganath, Joan Bruna
tl;dr: Performing one step of policy iteration provides a strong baseline for offline RL.
Most prior approaches to offline reinforcement learning (RL) have taken an iterative actor-critic approach involving off-policy evaluation. In this paper we show that simply doing one step of constrained/regularized policy improvement using an on-policy Q estimate of the behavior policy performs surprisingly well. This one-step algorithm beats the previously reported results of iterative algorithms on a large portion of the D4RL benchmark. The one-step baseline achieves this strong performance while being notably simpler and more robust to hyperparameters than previously proposed iterative algorithms. We argue that the relatively poor performance of iterative approaches is a result of the high variance inherent in doing off-policy evaluation and magnified by the repeated optimization of policies against those estimates. In addition, we hypothesize that the strong performance of the one-step algorithm is due to a combination of favorable structure in the environment and behavior policy.
Rishabh Agarwal, Max Schwarzer, Pablo Samuel Castro, Aaron Courville, Marc G Bellemare
tl;dr: Our findings call for a change in how we report performance on benchmarks when using only a few runs, for which we present more reliable protocols accompanied with an open-source library.
Deep reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms are predominantly evaluated by comparing their relative performance on a large suite of tasks. Most published results on deep RL benchmarks compare point estimates of aggregate performance such as mean and median scores across tasks, ignoring the statistical uncertainty implied by the use of a finite number of training runs. Beginning with the Arcade Learning Environment (ALE), the shift towards computationally-demanding benchmarks has led to the practice of evaluating only a small number of runs per task, exacerbating the statistical uncertainty in point estimates. In this paper, we argue that reliable evaluation in the few run deep RL regime cannot ignore the uncertainty in results without running the risk of slowing down progress in the field. We illustrate this point using a case study on the Atari 100k benchmark, where we find substantial discrepancies between conclusions drawn from point estimates alone versus a more thorough statistical analysis. With the aim of increasing the field's confidence in reported results with a handful of runs, we advocate for reporting interval estimates of aggregate performance and propose performance profiles to account for the variability in results, as well as present more robust and efficient aggregate metrics, such as interquartile mean scores, to achieve small uncertainty in results. Using such statistical tools, we scrutinize performance evaluations of existing algorithms on other widely used RL benchmarks including the ALE, Procgen, and the DeepMind Control Suite, again revealing discrepancies in prior comparisons. Our findings call for a change in how we evaluate performance in deep RL, for which we present a more rigorous evaluation methodology, accompanied with an open-source library rliable, to prevent unreliable results from stagnating the field. This work received an outstanding paper award at NeurIPS 2021.
Peng Wang, Lingjie Liu, Yuan Liu, Christian Theobalt, Taku Komura, Wenping Wang
tl;dr: We propose a novel method for multi-view neural surface reconstruction.
We present a novel neural surface reconstruction method, called NeuS, for reconstructing objects and scenes with high fidelity from 2D image inputs. Existing neural surface reconstruction approaches, such as DVR [Niemeyer et al., 2020] and IDR [Yariv et al., 2020], require foreground mask as supervision, easily get trapped in local minima, and therefore struggle with the reconstruction of objects with severe self-occlusion or thin structures. Meanwhile, recent neural methods for novel view synthesis, such as NeRF [Mildenhall et al., 2020] and its variants, use volume rendering to produce a neural scene representation with robustness of optimization, even for highly complex objects. However, extracting high-quality surfaces from this learned implicit representation is difficult because there are not sufficient surface constraints in the representation. In NeuS, we propose to represent a surface as the zero-level set of a signed distance function (SDF) and develop a new volume rendering method to train a neural SDF representation. We observe that the conventional volume rendering method causes inherent geometric errors (i.e. bias) for surface reconstruction, and therefore propose a new formulation that is free of bias in the first order of approximation, thus leading to more accurate surface reconstruction even without the mask supervision. Experiments on the DTU dataset and the BlendedMVS dataset show that NeuS outperforms the state-of-the-arts in high-quality surface reconstruction, especially for objects and scenes with complex structures and self-occlusion.
Hongyu Ren, Hanjun Dai, Zihang Dai, Mengjiao Yang, Jure Leskovec, Dale Schuurmans, Bo Dai
tl;dr: We propose Combiner, a drop-in replacement of attention, achieving the full attention with sub-quadratic cost using structured factorization. The proposed Combiner achieves SOTA on variety of tasks.
Transformers provide a class of expressive architectures that are extremely effective for sequence modeling. However, the key limitation of transformers is their quadratic memory and time complexity $\mathcal{O}(L^2)$ with respect to the sequence length in attention layers, which restricts application in extremely long sequences. Most existing approaches leverage sparsity or low-rank assumptions in the attention matrix to reduce cost, but sacrifice expressiveness. Instead, we propose Combiner, which provides full attention capability in each attention head while maintaining low computation and memory complexity. The key idea is to treat the self-attention mechanism as a conditional expectation over embeddings at each location, and approximate the conditional distribution with a structured factorization. Each location can attend to all other locations, either via direct attention, or through indirect attention to abstractions, which are again conditional expectations of embeddings from corresponding local regions. We show that most sparse attention patterns used in existing sparse transformers are able to inspire the design of such factorization for full attention, resulting in the same sub-quadratic cost ($\mathcal{O}(L\log(L))$ or $\mathcal{O}(L\sqrt{L})$). Combiner is a drop-in replacement for attention layers in existing transformers and can be easily implemented in common frameworks. An experimental evaluation on both autoregressive and bidirectional sequence tasks demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach, yielding state-of-the-art results on several image and text modeling tasks.
David Abel, Will Dabney, Anna Harutyunyan, Mark K Ho, Michael Littman, Doina Precup, Satinder Singh
tl;dr: We study the expressivity of Markov reward functions in finite environments by inspecting what kinds of tasks such functions can express.
Reward is the driving force for reinforcement-learning agents. This paper is dedicated to understanding the expressivity of reward as a way to capture tasks that we would want an agent to perform. We frame this study around three new abstract notions of “task” that might be desirable: (1) a set of acceptable behaviors, (2) a partial ordering over behaviors, or (3) a partial ordering over trajectories. Our main results prove that while reward can express many of these tasks, there exist instances of each task type that no Markov reward function can capture. We then provide a set of polynomial-time algorithms that construct a Markov reward function that allows an agent to optimize tasks of each of these three types, and correctly determine when no such reward function exists. We conclude with an empirical study that corroborates and illustrates our theoretical findings.
Joseph Oliver Pemberton, Ellen Boven, Richard Apps, Rui Ponte Costa
tl;dr: A systems-level model of cortico-cerebellar loops based on decoupled neural interfaces explains a wide range of observations.
The brain solves the credit assignment problem remarkably well. For credit to be assigned across neural networks they must, in principle, wait for specific neural computations to finish. How the brain deals with this inherent locking problem has remained unclear. Deep learning methods suffer from similar locking constraints both on the forward and feedback phase. Recently, decoupled neural interfaces (DNIs) were introduced as a solution to the forward and feedback locking problems in deep networks. Here we propose that a specialised brain region, the cerebellum, helps the cerebral cortex solve similar locking problems akin to DNIs. To demonstrate the potential of this framework we introduce a systems-level model in which a recurrent cortical network receives online temporal feedback predictions from a cerebellar module. We test this cortico-cerebellar recurrent neural network (ccRNN) model on a number of sensorimotor (line and digit drawing) and cognitive tasks (pattern recognition and caption generation) that have been shown to be cerebellar-dependent. In all tasks, we observe that ccRNNs facilitates learning while reducing ataxia-like behaviours, consistent with classical experimental observations. Moreover, our model also explains recent behavioural and neuronal observations while making several testable predictions across multiple levels. Overall, our work offers a novel perspective on the cerebellum as a brain-wide decoupling machine for efficient credit assignment and opens a new avenue between deep learning and neuroscience.
Gaspard Beugnot, Julien Mairal, Alessandro Rudi
tl;dr: The iterative Thikonov regularization scheme achieves optimal sample complexity on self concordant losses.
The theory of spectral filtering is a remarkable tool to understand the statistical properties of learning with kernels. For least squares, it allows to derive various regularization schemes that yield faster convergence rates of the excess risk than with Tikhonov regularization. This is typically achieved by leveraging classical assumptions called source and capacity conditions, which characterize the difficulty of the learning task. In order to understand estimators derived from other loss functions, Marteau-Ferey et al. have extended the theory of Tikhonov regularization to generalized self concordant loss functions (GSC), which contain, e.g., the logistic loss. In this paper, we go a step further and show that fast and optimal rates can be achieved for GSC by using the iterated Tikhonov regularization scheme, which is intrinsically related to the proximal point method in optimization, and overcomes the limitation of the classical Tikhonov regularization.
Zongxin Yang, Yunchao Wei, Yi Yang
This paper investigates how to realize better and more efficient embedding learning to tackle the semi-supervised video object segmentation under challenging multi-object scenarios. The state-of-the-art methods learn to decode features with a single positive object and thus have to match and segment each target separately under multi-object scenarios, consuming multiple times computing resources. To solve the problem, we propose an Associating Objects with Transformers (AOT) approach to match and decode multiple objects uniformly. In detail, AOT employs an identification mechanism to associate multiple targets into the same high-dimensional embedding space. Thus, we can simultaneously process multiple objects' matching and segmentation decoding as efficiently as processing a single object. For sufficiently modeling multi-object association, a Long Short-Term Transformer is designed for constructing hierarchical matching and propagation. We conduct extensive experiments on both multi-object and single-object benchmarks to examine AOT variant networks with different complexities. Particularly, our R50-AOT-L outperforms all the state-of-the-art competitors on three popular benchmarks, i.e., YouTube-VOS (84.1% J&F), DAVIS 2017 (84.9%), and DAVIS 2016 (91.1%), while keeping more than 3X faster multi-object run-time. Meanwhile, our AOT-T can maintain real-time multi-object speed on the above benchmarks. Based on AOT, we ranked 1st in the 3rd Large-scale VOS Challenge.
Andrew Campbell, Yuyang Shi, Tom Rainforth, Arnaud Doucet
tl;dr: Novel online variational inference to perform joint state estimation and parameter learning
We present a variational method for online state estimation and parameter learning in state-space models (SSMs), a ubiquitous class of latent variable models for sequential data. As per standard batch variational techniques, we use stochastic gradients to simultaneously optimize a lower bound on the log evidence with respect to both model parameters and a variational approximation of the states' posterior distribution. However, unlike existing approaches, our method is able to operate in an entirely online manner, such that historic observations do not require revisitation after being incorporated and the cost of updates at each time step remains constant, despite the growing dimensionality of the joint posterior distribution of the states. This is achieved by utilizing backward decompositions of this joint posterior distribution and of its variational approximation, combined with Bellman-type recursions for the evidence lower bound and its gradients. We demonstrate the performance of this methodology across several examples, including high-dimensional SSMs and sequential Variational Auto-Encoders.
Ziang Chen, Jianfeng Lu, Yulong Lu
Numerical solutions to high-dimensional partial differential equations (PDEs) based on neural networks have seen exciting developments. This paper derives complexity estimates of the solutions of $d$-dimensional second-order elliptic PDEs in the Barron space, that is a set of functions admitting the integral of certain parametric ridge function against a probability measure on the parameters. We prove under some appropriate assumptions that if the coefficients and the source term of the elliptic PDE lie in Barron spaces, then the solution of the PDE is $\epsilon$-close with respect to the $H^1$ norm to a Barron function. Moreover, we prove dimension-explicit bounds for the Barron norm of this approximate solution, depending at most polynomially on the dimension $d$ of the PDE. As a direct consequence of the complexity estimates, the solution of the PDE can be approximated on any bounded domain by a two-layer neural network with respect to the $H^1$ norm with a dimension-explicit convergence rate.
Tan Wang, Zhongqi Yue, Jianqiang Huang, Qianru Sun, Hanwang Zhang
tl;dr: An iterative IRM algorithm for unsupervised feature disentanglement and self-supervised feature learning
A good visual representation is an inference map from observations (images) to features (vectors) that faithfully reflects the hidden modularized generative factors (semantics). In this paper, we formulate the notion of "good" representation from a group-theoretic view using Higgins' definition of disentangled representation, and show that existing Self-Supervised Learning (SSL) only disentangles simple augmentation features such as rotation and colorization, thus unable to modularize the remaining semantics. To break the limitation, we propose an iterative SSL algorithm: Iterative Partition-based Invariant Risk Minimization (IP-IRM), which successfully grounds the abstract semantics and the group acting on them into concrete contrastive learning. At each iteration, IP-IRM first partitions the training samples into two subsets that correspond to an entangled group element. Then, it minimizes a subset-invariant contrastive loss, where the invariance guarantees to disentangle the group element. We prove that IP-IRM converges to a fully disentangled representation and show its effectiveness on various benchmarks. Codes are available at https://github.com/Wangt-CN/IP-IRM.
Tete Xiao, Mannat Singh, Eric Mintun, Trevor Darrell, Piotr Dollar, Ross Girshick
Vision transformer (ViT) models exhibit substandard optimizability. In particular, they are sensitive to the choice of optimizer (AdamW vs. SGD), optimizer hyperparameters, and training schedule length. In comparison, modern convolutional neural networks are easier to optimize. Why is this the case? In this work, we conjecture that the issue lies with the patchify stem of ViT models, which is implemented by a stride-p p×p convolution (p = 16 by default) applied to the input image. This large-kernel plus large-stride convolution runs counter to typical design choices of convolutional layers in neural networks. To test whether this atypical design choice causes an issue, we analyze the optimization behavior of ViT models with their original patchify stem versus a simple counterpart where we replace the ViT stem by a small number of stacked stride-two 3×3 convolutions. While the vast majority of computation in the two ViT designs is identical, we find that this small change in early visual processing results in markedly different training behavior in terms of the sensitivity to optimization settings as well as the final model accuracy. Using a convolutional stem in ViT dramatically increases optimization stability and also improves peak performance (by ∼1-2% top-1 accuracy on ImageNet-1k), while maintaining flops and runtime. The improvement can be observed across the wide spectrum of model complexities (from 1G to 36G flops) and dataset scales (from ImageNet-1k to ImageNet-21k). These findings lead us to recommend using a standard, lightweight convolutional stem for ViT models in this regime as a more robust architectural choice compared to the original ViT model design.
Nan Ding, Xi Chen, Tomer Levinboim, Sebastian Goodman, Radu Soricut
tl;dr: Improve PAC-Bayesian bounds on few-shot meta-learning.
Despite recent advances in its theoretical understanding, there still remains a significant gap in the ability of existing PAC-Bayesian theories on meta-learning to explain performance improvements in the few-shot learning setting, where the number of training examples in the target tasks is severely limited. This gap originates from an assumption in the existing theories which supposes that the number of training examples in the observed tasks and the number of training examples in the target tasks follow the same distribution, an assumption that rarely holds in practice. By relaxing this assumption, we develop two PAC-Bayesian bounds tailored for the few-shot learning setting and show that two existing meta-learning algorithms (MAML and Reptile) can be derived from our bounds, thereby bridging the gap between practice and PAC-Bayesian theories. Furthermore, we derive a new computationally-efficient PACMAML algorithm, and show it outperforms existing meta-learning algorithms on several few-shot benchmark datasets.
Reilly Raab, Yang Liu
tl;dr: Careless deployment of machine learning classifiers can induce social changes that maintain existing disparities between structurally equivalent groups.
Realistically---and equitably---modeling the dynamics of group-level disparities in machine learning remains an open problem. In particular, we desire models that do not suppose inherent differences between artificial groups of people---but rather endogenize disparities by appeal to unequal initial conditions of insular subpopulations. In this paper, agents each have a real-valued feature $X$ (e.g., credit score) informed by a ``true'' binary label $Y$ representing qualification (e.g., for a loan). Each agent alternately (1) receives a binary classification label $\hat{Y}$ (e.g., loan approval) from a Bayes-optimal machine learning classifier observing $X$ and (2) may update their qualification $Y$ by imitating successful strategies (e.g., seek a raise) within an isolated group $G$ of agents to which they belong. We consider the disparity of qualification rates $\Pr(Y=1)$ between different groups and how this disparity changes subject to a sequence of Bayes-optimal classifiers repeatedly retrained on the global population. We model the evolving qualification rates of each subpopulation (group) using the replicator equation, which derives from a class of imitation processes. We show that differences in qualification rates between subpopulations can persist indefinitely for a set of non-trivial equilibrium states due to uniformed classifier deployments, even when groups are identical in all aspects except initial qualification densities. We next simulate the effects of commonly proposed fairness interventions on this dynamical system along with a new feedback control mechanism capable of permanently eliminating group-level qualification rate disparities. We conclude by discussing the limitations of our model and findings and by outlining potential future work.
Frederik Träuble, Julius Von Kügelgen, Matthäus Kleindessner, Francesco Locatello, Bernhard Schölkopf, Peter Vincent Gehler
tl;dr: A probabilistic method to improve predictions on your data when new and potentially better models become available.
When machine learning systems meet real world applications, accuracy is only one of several requirements. In this paper, we assay a complementary perspective originating from the increasing availability of pre-trained and regularly improving state-of-the-art models. While new improved models develop at a fast pace, downstream tasks vary more slowly or stay constant. Assume that we have a large unlabelled data set for which we want to maintain accurate predictions. Whenever a new and presumably better ML models becomes available, we encounter two problems: (i) given a limited budget, which data points should be re-evaluated using the new model?; and (ii) if the new predictions differ from the current ones, should we update? Problem (i) is about compute cost, which matters for very large data sets and models. Problem (ii) is about maintaining consistency of the predictions, which can be highly relevant for downstream applications; our demand is to avoid negative flips, i.e., changing correct to incorrect predictions. In this paper, we formalize the Prediction Update Problem and present an efficient probabilistic approach as answer to the above questions. In extensive experiments on standard classification benchmark data sets, we show that our method outperforms alternative strategies along key metrics for backward-compatible prediction updates.
Daniela Mihai, Jonathon Hare
tl;dr: We use self-supervised play to train artificial agents to communicate by drawing and then show that with the appropriate inductive bias a human can successfully play the same games with the pretrained drawing agent.
Evidence that visual communication preceded written language and provided a basis for it goes back to prehistory, in forms such as cave and rock paintings depicting traces of our distant ancestors. Emergent communication research has sought to explore how agents can learn to communicate in order to collaboratively solve tasks. Existing research has focused on language, with a learned communication channel transmitting sequences of discrete tokens between the agents. In this work, we explore a visual communication channel between agents that are allowed to draw with simple strokes. Our agents are parameterised by deep neural networks, and the drawing procedure is differentiable, allowing for end-to-end training. In the framework of a referential communication game, we demonstrate that agents can not only successfully learn to communicate by drawing, but with appropriate inductive biases, can do so in a fashion that humans can interpret. We hope to encourage future research to consider visual communication as a more flexible and directly interpretable alternative of training collaborative agents.
Hanzhe Hu, Fangyun Wei, Han Hu, Qiwei Ye, Jinshi Cui, Liwei Wang
tl;dr: We introduce a semi-supervised learning framework for semantic segmentation.
Due to the limited and even imbalanced data, semi-supervised semantic segmentation tends to have poor performance on some certain categories, e.g., tailed categories in Cityscapes dataset which exhibits a long-tailed label distribution. Existing approaches almost all neglect this problem, and treat categories equally. Some popular approaches such as consistency regularization or pseudo-labeling may even harm the learning of under-performing categories, that the predictions or pseudo labels of these categories could be too inaccurate to guide the learning on the unlabeled data. In this paper, we look into this problem, and propose a novel framework for semi-supervised semantic segmentation, named adaptive equalization learning (AEL). AEL adaptively balances the training of well and badly performed categories, with a confidence bank to dynamically track category-wise performance during training. The confidence bank is leveraged as an indicator to tilt training towards under-performing categories, instantiated in three strategies: 1) adaptive Copy-Paste and CutMix data augmentation approaches which give more chance for under-performing categories to be copied or cut; 2) an adaptive data sampling approach to encourage pixels from under-performing category to be sampled; 3) a simple yet effective re-weighting method to alleviate the training noise raised by pseudo-labeling. Experimentally, AEL outperforms the state-of-the-art methods by a large margin on the Cityscapes and Pascal VOC benchmarks under various data partition protocols. Code is available at https://github.com/hzhupku/SemiSeg-AEL.
MAHDI HAGHIFAM, Gintare Karolina Dziugaite, Shay Moran, Daniel M. Roy
tl;dr: We show that the CMI framework can be used to obtain optimal or near-optimal bounds for the expected excess risk for a wide range of algorithms.
In this work, we investigate the expressiveness of the "conditional mutual information" (CMI) framework of Steinke and Zakynthinou (2020) and the prospect of using it to provide a unified framework for proving generalization bounds in the realizable setting. We first demonstrate that one can use this framework to express non-trivial (but sub-optimal) bounds for any learning algorithm that outputs hypotheses from a class of bounded VC dimension. We then explore two directions of strengthening this bound: (i) Can the CMI framework express optimal bounds for VC classes? (ii) Can the CMI framework be used to analyze algorithms whose output hypothesis space is unrestricted (i.e. has an unbounded VC dimension)? With respect to Item (i) we prove that the CMI framework yields the optimal bound on the expected risk of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) for learning halfspaces. This result is an application of our general result showing that stable compression schemes Bousquet al. (2020) of size $k$ have uniformly bounded CMI of order $O(k)$. We further show that an inherent limitation of proper learning of VC classes contradicts the existence of a proper learner with constant CMI, and it implies a negative resolution to an open problem of Steinke and Zakynthinou (2020). We further study the CMI of empirical risk minimizers (ERMs) of class $H$ and show that it is possible to output all consistent classifiers (version space) with bounded CMI if and only if $H$ has a bounded star number (Hanneke and Yang (2015)). With respect to Item (ii) we prove a general reduction showing that "leave-one-out" analysis is expressible via the CMI framework. As a corollary we investigate the CMI of the one-inclusion-graph algorithm proposed by Haussler et al. (1994). More generally, we show that the CMI framework is universal in the sense that for every consistent algorithm and data distribution, the expected risk vanishes as the number of samples diverges if and only if its evaluated CMI has sublinear growth with the number of samples.
Frederic Koehler, Lijia Zhou, Danica J. Sutherland, Nathan Srebro
tl;dr: Uniform convergence of interpolating predictors can explain consistency for high-dimensional linear regression.
We consider interpolation learning in high-dimensional linear regression with Gaussian data, and prove a generic uniform convergence guarantee on the generalization error of interpolators in an arbitrary hypothesis class in terms of the class’s Gaussian width. Applying the generic bound to Euclidean norm balls recovers the consistency result of Bartlett et al. (2020) for minimum-norm interpolators, and confirms a prediction of Zhou et al. (2020) for near-minimal-norm interpolators in the special case of Gaussian data. We demonstrate the generality of the bound by applying it to the simplex, obtaining a novel consistency result for minimum $\ell_1$-norm interpolators (basis pursuit). Our results show how norm-based generalization bounds can explain and be used to analyze benign overfitting, at least in some settings.
Hugo Soulat, Sepiedeh Keshavarzi, Troy William Margrie, Maneesh Sahani
The firing of neural populations is coordinated across cells, in time, and across experimental conditions or repeated experimental trials; and so a full understanding of the computational significance of neural responses must be based on a separation of these different contributions to structured activity. Tensor decomposition is an approach to untangling the influence of multiple factors in data that is common in many fields. However, despite some recent interest in neuroscience, wider applicability of the approach is hampered by the lack of a full probabilistic treatment allowing principled inference of a decomposition from non-Gaussian spike-count data. Here, we extend the Pólya-Gamma (PG) augmentation, previously used in sampling-based Bayesian inference, to implement scalable variational inference in non-conjugate spike-count models. Using this new approach, we develop techniques related to automatic relevance determination to infer the most appropriate tensor rank, as well as to incorporate priors based on known brain anatomy such as the segregation of cell response properties by brain area. We apply the model to neural recordings taken under conditions of visual-vestibular sensory integration, revealing how the encoding of self- and visual-motion signals is modulated by the sensory information available to the animal.
Alexei Baevski, Wei-Ning Hsu, Alexis Conneau, Michael Auli
tl;dr: Unsupervised learning of speech recognition models using self-supervised representations.
Despite rapid progress in the recent past, current speech recognition systems still require labeled training data which limits this technology to a small fraction of the languages spoken around the globe. This paper describes wav2vec-U, short for wav2vec Unsupervised, a method to train speech recognition models without any labeled data. We leverage self-supervised speech representations to segment unlabeled audio and learn a mapping from these representations to phonemes via adversarial training. The right representations are key to the success of our method. Compared to the best previous unsupervised work, wav2vec-U reduces the phone error rate on the TIMIT benchmark from 26.1 to 11.3. On the larger English Librispeech benchmark, wav2vec-U achieves a word error rate of 5.9 on test-other, rivaling some of the best published systems trained on 960 hours of labeled data from only two years ago. We also experiment on nine other languages, including low-resource languages such as Kyrgyz, Swahili and Tatar.
Tomas Geffner, Justin Domke
tl;dr: We introduce a new method combining VI and HMC that yields tighter and differentiable lower bounds on the marginal likelihood.
Given an unnormalized target distribution we want to obtain approximate samples from it and a tight lower bound on its (log) normalization constant log Z. Annealed Importance Sampling (AIS) with Hamiltonian MCMC is a powerful method that can be used to do this. Its main drawback is that it uses non-differentiable transition kernels, which makes tuning its many parameters hard. We propose a framework to use an AIS-like procedure with Uncorrected Hamiltonian MCMC, called Uncorrected Hamiltonian Annealing. Our method leads to tight and differentiable lower bounds on log Z. We show empirically that our method yields better performances than other competing approaches, and that the ability to tune its parameters using reparameterization gradients may lead to large performance improvements.
Andrew Szot, Alexander Clegg, Eric Undersander, Erik Wijmans, Yili Zhao, John M Turner, Noah D Maestre, Mustafa Mukadam, Devendra Singh Chaplot, Oleksandr Maksymets, Aaron Gokaslan, Vladimír Vondruš, Sameer Dharur, Franziska Meier, Wojciech Galuba, Angel X Chang, Zsolt Kira, Vladlen Koltun, Jitendra Malik, Manolis Savva, Dhruv Batra
We introduce Habitat 2.0 (H2.0), a simulation platform for training virtual robots in interactive 3D environments and complex physics-enabled scenarios. We make comprehensive contributions to all levels of the embodied AI stack – data, simulation, and benchmark tasks. Specifically, we present: (i) ReplicaCAD: an artist-authored, annotated, reconfigurable 3D dataset of apartments (matching real spaces) with articulated objects (e.g. cabinets and drawers that can open/close); (ii) H2.0: a high-performance physics-enabled 3D simulator with speeds exceeding 25,000 simulation steps per second (850x real-time) on an 8-GPU node, representing 100x speed-ups over prior work; and, (iii) Home Assistant Benchmark (HAB): a suite of common tasks for assistive robots (tidy the house, stock groceries, set the table) that test a range of mobile manipulation capabilities. These large-scale engineering contributions allow us to systematically compare deep reinforcement learning (RL) at scale and classical sense-plan-act (SPA) pipelines in long-horizon structured tasks, with an emphasis on generalization to new objects, receptacles, and layouts. We find that (1) flat RL policies struggle on HAB compared to hierarchical ones; (2) a hierarchy with independent skills suffers from ‘hand-off problems’, and (3) SPA pipelines are more brittle than RL policies.
Geng Yuan, Xiaolong Ma, Wei Niu, Zhengang Li, Zhenglun Kong, Ning Liu, Yifan Gong, Zheng Zhan, Chaoyang He, Qing Jin, Siyue Wang, Minghai Qin, Bin Ren, Yanzhi Wang, Sijia Liu, Xue Lin
Recently, a new trend of exploring sparsity for accelerating neural network training has emerged, embracing the paradigm of training on the edge. This paper proposes a novel Memory-Economic Sparse Training (MEST) framework targeting for accurate and fast execution on edge devices. The proposed MEST framework consists of enhancements by Elastic Mutation (EM) and Soft Memory Bound (&S) that ensure superior accuracy at high sparsity ratios. Different from the existing works for sparse training, this current work reveals the importance of sparsity schemes on the performance of sparse training in terms of accuracy as well as training speed on real edge devices. On top of that, the paper proposes to employ data efficiency for further acceleration of sparse training. Our results suggest that unforgettable examples can be identified in-situ even during the dynamic exploration of sparsity masks in the sparse training process, and therefore can be removed for further training speedup on edge devices. Comparing with state-of-the-art (SOTA) works on accuracy, our MEST increases Top-1 accuracy significantly on ImageNet when using the same unstructured sparsity scheme. Systematical evaluation on accuracy, training speed, and memory footprint are conducted, where the proposed MEST framework consistently outperforms representative SOTA works. A reviewer strongly against our work based on his false assumptions and misunderstandings. On top of the previous submission, we employ data efficiency for further acceleration of sparse training. And we explore the impact of model sparsity, sparsity schemes, and sparse training algorithms on the number of removable training examples. Our codes are publicly available at: https://github.com/boone891214/MEST.
Miklos Z. Racz, Anirudh Sridhar
tl;dr: By determining the information-theoretic limits for exact graph matching in edge-correlated stochastic block models, we show how to combine information from multiple networks to improve community recovery algorithms.
We consider the task of learning latent community structure from multiple correlated networks. First, we study the problem of learning the latent vertex correspondence between two edge-correlated stochastic block models, focusing on the regime where the average degree is logarithmic in the number of vertices. We derive the precise information-theoretic threshold for exact recovery: above the threshold there exists an estimator that outputs the true correspondence with probability close to 1, while below it no estimator can recover the true correspondence with probability bounded away from 0. As an application of our results, we show how one can exactly recover the latent communities using \emph{multiple} correlated graphs in parameter regimes where it is information-theoretically impossible to do so using just a single graph.
Chongjian GE, Youwei Liang, Yibing Song, Jianbo Jiao, Jue Wang, Ping Luo
tl;dr: We revitalize CNN encoder attentions via transformer in self-supervised visual representation learning
Studies on self-supervised visual representation learning (SSL) improve encoder backbones to discriminate training samples without labels. While CNN encoders via SSL achieve comparable recognition performance to those via supervised learning, their network attention is under-explored for further improvement. Motivated by the transformers that explore visual attention effectively in recognition scenarios, we propose a CNN Attention REvitalization (CARE) framework to train attentive CNN encoders guided by transformers in SSL. The proposed CARE framework consists of a CNN stream (C-stream) and a transformer stream (T-stream), where each stream contains two branches. C-stream follows an existing SSL framework with two CNN encoders, two projectors, and a predictor. T-stream contains two transformers, two projectors, and a predictor. T-stream connects to CNN encoders and is in parallel to the remaining C-Stream. During training, we perform SSL in both streams simultaneously and use the T-stream output to supervise C-stream. The features from CNN encoders are modulated in T-stream for visual attention enhancement and become suitable for the SSL scenario. We use these modulated features to supervise C-stream for learning attentive CNN encoders. To this end, we revitalize CNN attention by using transformers as guidance. Experiments on several standard visual recognition benchmarks, including image classification, object detection, and semantic segmentation, show that the proposed CARE framework improves CNN encoder backbones to the state-of-the-art performance.
Quentin Mérigot, Filippo Santambrogio, Clément SARRAZIN
tl;dr: We provide explicit error estimates for the output of the Lloyd-type algorithm used in uniform optimal quantization with respect to the sample size.
Several issues in machine learning and inverse problems require to generate discrete data, as if sampled from a model probability distribution. A common way to do so relies on the construction of a uniform probability distribution over a set of $N$ points which minimizes the Wasserstein distance to the model distribution. This minimization problem, where the unknowns are the positions of the atoms, is non-convex. Yet, in most cases, a suitably adjusted version of Lloyd's algorithm in which Voronoi cells are replaced by Power cells, leads to configurations with small Wasserstein error. This is surprising because, again, of the non-convex nature of the problem, which moreover admits spurious critical points. We provide explicit upper bounds for the convergence speed of this Lloyd-type algorithm, starting from a cloud of points sufficiently far from each other. This already works after one step of the iteration procedure, and similar bounds can be deduced, for the corresponding gradient descent. These bounds naturally lead to a sort of Poliak-Łojasiewicz inequality for the Wasserstein distance cost, with an error term depending on the distances between Dirac masses in the discrete distribution.
Alberto Maria Metelli, Alessio Russo, Marcello Restelli
Importance Sampling (IS) is a widely used building block for a large variety of off-policy estimation and learning algorithms. However, empirical and theoretical studies have progressively shown that vanilla IS leads to poor estimations whenever the behavioral and target policies are too dissimilar. In this paper, we analyze the theoretical properties of the IS estimator by deriving a novel anticoncentration bound that formalizes the intuition behind its undesired behavior. Then, we propose a new class of IS transformations, based on the notion of power mean. To the best of our knowledge, the resulting estimator is the first to achieve, under certain conditions, two key properties: (i) it displays a subgaussian concentration rate; (ii) it preserves the differentiability in the target distribution. Finally, we provide numerical simulations on both synthetic examples and contextual bandits, in comparison with off-policy evaluation and learning baselines.
Jannik Kossen, Neil Band, Clare Lyle, Aidan Gomez, Tom Rainforth, Yarin Gal
tl;dr: We introduce a novel deep learning architecture that takes the entire dataset as input and learns to reason about relationships between datapoints using self-attention.
We challenge a common assumption underlying most supervised deep learning: that a model makes a prediction depending only on its parameters and the features of a single input. To this end, we introduce a general-purpose deep learning architecture that takes as input the entire dataset instead of processing one datapoint at a time. Our approach uses self-attention to reason about relationships between datapoints explicitly, which can be seen as realizing non-parametric models using parametric attention mechanisms. However, unlike conventional non-parametric models, we let the model learn end-to-end from the data how to make use of other datapoints for prediction. Empirically, our models solve cross-datapoint lookup and complex reasoning tasks unsolvable by traditional deep learning models. We show highly competitive results on tabular data, early results on CIFAR-10, and give insight into how the model makes use of the interactions between points.
Matteo Sesia, Yaniv Romano
tl;dr: This paper develops and studies a novel conformal method to compute prediction intervals that automatically adapt to skewed data.
This paper develops a conformal method to compute prediction intervals for non-parametric regression that can automatically adapt to skewed data. Leveraging black-box machine learning algorithms to estimate the conditional distribution of the outcome using histograms, it translates their output into the shortest prediction intervals with approximate conditional coverage. The resulting prediction intervals provably have marginal coverage in finite samples, while asymptotically achieving conditional coverage and optimal length if the black-box model is consistent. Numerical experiments with simulated and real data demonstrate improved performance compared to state-of-the-art alternatives, including conformalized quantile regression and other distributional conformal prediction approaches.
Vincent Sitzmann, Semon Rezchikov, William T. Freeman, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Fredo Durand
tl;dr: We parameterize scenes as 4D light fields instead of 3D implicit representations, enabling real-time rendering with only a single evaluation of the network per ray.
Inferring representations of 3D scenes from 2D observations is a fundamental problem of computer graphics, computer vision, and artificial intelligence. Emerging 3D-structured neural scene representations are a promising approach to 3D scene understanding. In this work, we propose a novel neural scene representation, Light Field Networks or LFNs, which represent both geometry and appearance of the underlying 3D scene in a 360-degree, four-dimensional light field parameterized via a neural implicit representation. Rendering a ray from an LFN requires only a *single* network evaluation, as opposed to hundreds of evaluations per ray for ray-marching or volumetric based renderers in 3D-structured neural scene representations. In the setting of simple scenes, we leverage meta-learning to learn a prior over LFNs that enables multi-view consistent light field reconstruction from as little as a single image observation. This results in dramatic reductions in time and memory complexity, and enables real-time rendering. The cost of storing a 360-degree light field via an LFN is two orders of magnitude lower than conventional methods such as the Lumigraph. Utilizing the analytical differentiability of neural implicit representations and a novel parameterization of light space, we further demonstrate the extraction of sparse depth maps from LFNs.
YoungJoong Kwon, Dahun Kim, Duygu Ceylan, Henry Fuchs
tl;dr: Generalizable NeRF methods for synthesizing a free-viewpoint video of an arbitrary human performance using sparse multi-view cameras
In this paper, we aim at synthesizing a free-viewpoint video of an arbitrary human performance using sparse multi-view cameras. Recently, several works have addressed this problem by learning person-specific neural radiance fields (NeRF) to capture the appearance of a particular human. In parallel, some work proposed to use pixel-aligned features to generalize radiance fields to arbitrary new scenes and objects. Adopting such generalization approaches to humans, however, is highly challenging due to the heavy occlusions and dynamic articulations of body parts. To tackle this, we propose Neural Human Performer, a novel approach that learns generalizable neural radiance fields based on a parametric human body model for robust performance capture. Specifically, we first introduce a temporal transformer that aggregates tracked visual features based on the skeletal body motion over time. Moreover, a multi-view transformer is proposed to perform cross-attention between the temporally-fused features and the pixel-aligned features at each time step to integrate observations on the fly from multiple views. Experiments on the ZJU-MoCap and AIST datasets show that our method significantly outperforms recent generalizable NeRF methods on unseen identities and poses.
Guocheng Qian, Hasan Abed Al Kader Hammoud, Guohao Li, Ali Thabet, Bernard Ghanem
tl;dr: We introduce a novel Anisotropic Separable Set Abstraction module and present ASSANet, a faster and more accurate variant of PointNet++.
Access to 3D point cloud representations has been widely facilitated by LiDAR sensors embedded in various mobile devices. This has led to an emerging need for fast and accurate point cloud processing techniques. In this paper, we revisit and dive deeper into PointNet++, one of the most influential yet under-explored networks, and develop faster and more accurate variants of the model. We first present a novel Separable Set Abstraction (SA) module that disentangles the vanilla SA module used in PointNet++ into two separate learning stages: (1) learning channel correlation and (2) learning spatial correlation. The Separable SA module is significantly faster than the vanilla version, yet it achieves comparable performance. We then introduce a new Anisotropic Reduction function into our Separable SA module and propose an Anisotropic Separable SA (ASSA) module that substantially increases the network's accuracy. We later replace the vanilla SA modules in PointNet++ with the proposed ASSA modules, and denote the modified network as ASSANet. Extensive experiments on point cloud classification, semantic segmentation, and part segmentation show that ASSANet outperforms PointNet++ and other methods, achieving much higher accuracy and faster speeds. In particular, ASSANet outperforms PointNet++ by $7.4$ mIoU on S3DIS Area 5, while maintaining $1.6 \times $ faster inference speed on a single NVIDIA 2080Ti GPU. Our scaled ASSANet variant achieves $66.8$ mIoU and outperforms KPConv, while being more than $54 \times$ faster.
Yanis Bahroun, Dmitri Chklovskii, Anirvan M. Sengupta
tl;dr: A normative approach to independent component analysis leads to the derivation of a biologically plausible neural network with local learning rules.
The brain effortlessly solves blind source separation (BSS) problems, but the algorithm it uses remains elusive. In signal processing, linear BSS problems are often solved by Independent Component Analysis (ICA). To serve as a model of a biological circuit, the ICA neural network (NN) must satisfy at least the following requirements: 1. The algorithm must operate in the online setting where data samples are streamed one at a time, and the NN computes the sources on the fly without storing any significant fraction of the data in memory. 2. The synaptic weight update is local, i.e., it depends only on the biophysical variables present in the vicinity of a synapse. Here, we propose a novel objective function for ICA from which we derive a biologically plausible NN, including both the neural architecture and the synaptic learning rules. Interestingly, our algorithm relies on modulating synaptic plasticity by the total activity of the output neurons. In the brain, this could be accomplished by neuromodulators, extracellular calcium, local field potential, or nitric oxide.
George Zhang, Jingjing Qian, Jun Chen, Ashish J Khisti
tl;dr: We define and characterize the rate-distortion-perception tradeoff when restricted to fixed encoders, then evaluate the performance in practice on deep learning enhanced image compression tasks.
In the context of lossy compression, Blau \& Michaeli (2019) adopt a mathematical notion of perceptual quality and define the information rate-distortion-perception function, generalizing the classical rate-distortion tradeoff. We consider the notion of universal representations in which one may fix an encoder and vary the decoder to achieve any point within a collection of distortion and perception constraints. We prove that the corresponding information-theoretic universal rate-distortion-perception function is operationally achievable in an approximate sense. Under MSE distortion, we show that the entire distortion-perception tradeoff of a Gaussian source can be achieved by a single encoder of the same rate asymptotically. We then characterize the achievable distortion-perception region for a fixed representation in the case of arbitrary distributions, and identify conditions under which the aforementioned results continue to hold approximately. This motivates the study of practical constructions that are approximately universal across the RDP tradeoff, thereby alleviating the need to design a new encoder for each objective. We provide experimental results on MNIST and SVHN suggesting that on image compression tasks, the operational tradeoffs achieved by machine learning models with a fixed encoder suffer only a small penalty when compared to their variable encoder counterparts.
Mathieu Even, Raphaël Berthier, Francis Bach, Nicolas Flammarion, Hadrien Hendrikx, Pierre Gaillard, Laurent Massoulié, Adrien Taylor
We introduce the ``continuized'' Nesterov acceleration, a close variant of Nesterov acceleration whose variables are indexed by a continuous time parameter. The two variables continuously mix following a linear ordinary differential equation and take gradient steps at random times. This continuized variant benefits from the best of the continuous and the discrete frameworks: as a continuous process, one can use differential calculus to analyze convergence and obtain analytical expressions for the parameters; but a discretization of the continuized process can be computed exactly with convergence rates similar to those of Nesterov original acceleration. We show that the discretization has the same structure as Nesterov acceleration, but with random parameters. We provide continuized Nesterov acceleration under deterministic as well as stochastic gradients, with either additive or multiplicative noise. Finally, using our continuized framework and expressing the gossip averaging problem as the stochastic minimization of a certain energy function, we provide the first rigorous acceleration of asynchronous gossip algorithms.
Omar Khattab, Christopher Potts, Matei Zaharia
tl;dr: We propose a system for multi-hop retrieval, with innovations in the system architecture, the retrieval modeling, and supervision.
Multi-hop reasoning (i.e., reasoning across two or more documents) is a key ingredient for NLP models that leverage large corpora to exhibit broad knowledge. To retrieve evidence passages, multi-hop models must contend with a fast-growing search space across the hops, represent complex queries that combine multiple information needs, and resolve ambiguity about the best order in which to hop between training passages. We tackle these problems via Baleen, a system that improves the accuracy of multi-hop retrieval while learning robustly from weak training signals in the many-hop setting. To tame the search space, we propose condensed retrieval, a pipeline that summarizes the retrieved passages after each hop into a single compact context. To model complex queries, we introduce a focused late interaction retriever that allows different parts of the same query representation to match disparate relevant passages. Lastly, to infer the hopping dependencies among unordered training passages, we devise latent hop ordering, a weak-supervision strategy in which the trained retriever itself selects the sequence of hops. We evaluate Baleen on retrieval for two-hop question answering and many-hop claim verification, establishing state-of-the-art performance.
Robert Geirhos, Kantharaju Narayanappa, Benjamin Mitzkus, Tizian Thieringer, Matthias Bethge, Felix A. Wichmann, Wieland Brendel
tl;dr: Data-rich models are closing the gap to human OOD distortion robustness and improve image-level consistency with human psychophysical data.
A few years ago, the first CNN surpassed human performance on ImageNet. However, it soon became clear that machines lack robustness on more challenging test cases, a major obstacle towards deploying machines "in the wild" and towards obtaining better computational models of human visual perception. Here we ask: Are we making progress in closing the gap between human and machine vision? To answer this question, we tested human observers on a broad range of out-of-distribution (OOD) datasets, recording 85,120 psychophysical trials across 90 participants. We then investigated a range of promising machine learning developments that crucially deviate from standard supervised CNNs along three axes: objective function (self-supervised, adversarially trained, CLIP language-image training), architecture (e.g. vision transformers), and dataset size (ranging from 1M to 1B). Our findings are threefold. (1.) The longstanding distortion robustness gap between humans and CNNs is closing, with the best models now exceeding human feedforward performance on most of the investigated OOD datasets. (2.) There is still a substantial image-level consistency gap, meaning that humans make different errors than models. In contrast, most models systematically agree in their categorisation errors, even substantially different ones like contrastive self-supervised vs. standard supervised models. (3.) In many cases, human-to-model consistency improves when training dataset size is increased by one to three orders of magnitude. Our results give reason for cautious optimism: While there is still much room for improvement, the behavioural difference between human and machine vision is narrowing. In order to measure future progress, 17 OOD datasets with image-level human behavioural data and evaluation code are provided as a toolbox and benchmark at: https://github.com/bethgelab/model-vs-human/
Hidenori Tanaka, Daniel Kunin
tl;dr: We develop a theoretical framework to study the "geometry of learning dynamics" in neural networks, derive Noether's learning dynamics, and reveal a role of symmetry breaking in learning.
In nature, symmetry governs regularities, while symmetry breaking brings texture. In artificial neural networks, symmetry has been a central design principle to efficiently capture regularities in the world, but the role of symmetry breaking is not well understood. Here, we develop a theoretical framework to study the "geometry of learning dynamics" in neural networks, and reveal a key mechanism of explicit symmetry breaking behind the efficiency and stability of modern neural networks. To build this understanding, we model the discrete learning dynamics of gradient descent using a continuous-time Lagrangian formulation, in which the learning rule corresponds to the kinetic energy and the loss function corresponds to the potential energy. Then, we identify "kinetic symmetry breaking" (KSB), the condition when the kinetic energy explicitly breaks the symmetry of the potential function. We generalize Noether’s theorem known in physics to take into account KSB and derive the resulting motion of the Noether charge: "Noether's Learning Dynamics" (NLD). Finally, we apply NLD to neural networks with normalization layers and reveal how KSB introduces a mechanism of implicit adaptive optimization, establishing an analogy between learning dynamics induced by normalization layers and RMSProp. Overall, through the lens of Lagrangian mechanics, we have established a theoretical foundation to discover geometric design principles for the learning dynamics of neural networks.
Prafulla Dhariwal, Alexander Quinn Nichol
tl;dr: We achieve state-of-the-art image generation on ImageNet and several LSUN classes with diffusion models.
We show that diffusion models can achieve image sample quality superior to the current state-of-the-art generative models. We achieve this on unconditional image synthesis by finding a better architecture through a series of ablations. For conditional image synthesis, we further improve sample quality with classifier guidance: a simple, compute-efficient method for trading off diversity for fidelity using gradients from a classifier. We achieve an FID of 2.97 on ImageNet 128$\times$128, 4.59 on ImageNet 256$\times$256, and 7.72 on ImageNet 512$\times$512, and we match BigGAN-deep even with as few as 25 forward passes per sample, all while maintaining better coverage of the distribution. Finally, we find that classifier guidance combines well with upsampling diffusion models, further improving FID to 3.94 on ImageNet 256$\times$256 and 3.85 on ImageNet 512$\times$512.
Amir Hertz, Or Perel, Raja Giryes, Olga Sorkine-hornung, Daniel Cohen-or
tl;dr: We introduce Spatially Adaptive Progressive Encoding (SAPE) layers, which gradually unmask signal components in a NN as a function of time and space.
Multilayer-perceptrons (MLP) are known to struggle learning functions of high-frequencies, and in particular, instances of wide frequency bands. We present a progressive mapping scheme for input signals of MLP networks, enabling them to better fit a wide range of frequencies without sacrificing training stability or requiring any domain specific preprocessing. We introduce Spatially Adaptive Progressive Encoding (SAPE) layers, which gradually unmask signal components with increasing frequencies as a function of time and space. The progressive exposure of frequencies is monitored by a feedback loop throughout the neural optimization process, allowing changes to propagate at different rates among local spatial portions of the signal space. We demonstrate the advantage of our method on variety of domains and applications: regression of low dimensional signals and images, representation learning of occupancy networks, and a geometric task of mesh transfer between 3D shapes.
Lars Lorch, Jonas Rothfuss, Bernhard Schölkopf, Andreas Krause
tl;dr: A fully differentiable method for joint Bayesian inference of graphs and parameters of general Bayesian networks
Bayesian structure learning allows inferring Bayesian network structure from data while reasoning about the epistemic uncertainty---a key element towards enabling active causal discovery and designing interventions in real world systems. In this work, we propose a general, fully differentiable framework for Bayesian structure learning (DiBS) that operates in the continuous space of a latent probabilistic graph representation. Contrary to existing work, DiBS is agnostic to the form of the local conditional distributions and allows for joint posterior inference of both the graph structure and the conditional distribution parameters. This makes our formulation directly applicable to posterior inference of nonstandard Bayesian network models, e.g., with nonlinear dependencies encoded by neural networks. Using DiBS, we devise an efficient, general purpose variational inference method for approximating distributions over structural models. In evaluations on simulated and real-world data, our method significantly outperforms related approaches to joint posterior inference.
Yihui Quek, Srinivasan A, John Smolin
tl;dr: A recent series of surprising implications between models of learning also hold for learning quantum states and real valued functions with noisy labels.
Learning an unknown n-qubit quantum state rho is a fundamental challenge in quantum computing. Information-theoretically, it is known that tomography requires exponential in n many copies of rho to estimate its entries. Motivated by learning theory, Aaronson et al. introduced many (weaker) learning models: the PAC model of learning states (Proceedings of Royal Society A'07), shadow tomography (STOC'18) for learning ``shadows" of a state, a model that also requires learners to be differentially private (STOC'19) and the online model of learning states (NeurIPS'18). In these models it was shown that an unknown state can be learned ``approximately" using linear in n many copies of rho. But is there any relationship between these models? In this paper we prove a sequence of (information-theoretic) implications from differentially-private PAC learning to online learning and then to quantum stability. Our main result generalizes the recent work of Bun, Livni and Moran (Journal of the ACM'21) who showed that finite Littlestone dimension (of Boolean-valued concept classes) implies PAC learnability in the (approximate) differentially private (DP) setting. We first consider their work in the real-valued setting and further extend to their techniques to the setting of learning quantum states. Key to our results is our generic quantum online learner, Robust Standard Optimal Algorithm (RSOA), which is robust to adversarial imprecision. We then show information-theoretic implications between DP learning quantum states in the PAC model, learnability of quantum states in the one-way communication model, online learning of quantum states, quantum stability (which is our conceptual contribution), various combinatorial parameters and give further applications to gentle shadow tomography and noisy quantum state learning.
Tengyang Xie, Ching-An Cheng, Nan Jiang, Paul Mineiro, Alekh Agarwal
tl;dr: We introduce the notion of Bellman-consistent pessimism for general function approximation in offline reinforcement learning.
The use of pessimism, when reasoning about datasets lacking exhaustive exploration has recently gained prominence in offline reinforcement learning. Despite the robustness it adds to the algorithm, overly pessimistic reasoning can be equally damaging in precluding the discovery of good policies, which is an issue for the popular bonus-based pessimism. In this paper, we introduce the notion of Bellman-consistent pessimism for general function approximation: instead of calculating a point-wise lower bound for the value function, we implement pessimism at the initial state over the set of functions consistent with the Bellman equations. Our theoretical guarantees only require Bellman closedness as standard in the exploratory setting, in which case bonus-based pessimism fails to provide guarantees. Even in the special case of linear function approximation where stronger expressivity assumptions hold, our result improves upon a recent bonus-based approach by $\mathcal O(d)$ in its sample complexity (when the action space is finite). Remarkably, our algorithms automatically adapt to the best bias-variance tradeoff in the hindsight, whereas most prior approaches require tuning extra hyperparameters a priori.
Evgenii E Chzhen, Christophe Giraud, Gilles Stoltz
tl;dr: We provide a general approachability-theorem based tool to tacke faire online adversarial learning (with stochastic contexts) and illustrate its application by working out several examples.
We provide a setting and a general approach to fair online learning with stochastic sensitive and non-sensitive contexts. The setting is a repeated game between the Player and Nature, where at each stage both pick actions based on the contexts. Inspired by the notion of unawareness, we assume that the Player can only access the non-sensitive context before making a decision, while we discuss both cases of Nature accessing the sensitive contexts and Nature unaware of the sensitive contexts. Adapting Blackwell's approachability theory to handle the case of an unknown contexts' distribution, we provide a general necessary and sufficient condition for learning objectives to be compatible with some fairness constraints. This condition is instantiated on (group-wise) no-regret and (group-wise) calibration objectives, and on demographic parity as an additional constraint. When the objective is not compatible with the constraint, the provided framework permits to characterise the optimal trade-off between the two.
Tiancheng Jin, Longbo Huang, Haipeng Luo
tl;dr: We propose algorithms to achieve best-of-both-worlds results of learning episodic MDPs.
We consider the best-of-both-worlds problem for learning an episodic Markov Decision Process through $T$ episodes, with the goal of achieving $\widetilde{\mathcal{O}}(\sqrt{T})$ regret when the losses are adversarial and simultaneously $\mathcal{O}(\log T)$ regret when the losses are (almost) stochastic. Recent work by [Jin and Luo, 2020] achieves this goal when the fixed transition is known, and leaves the case of unknown transition as a major open question. In this work, we resolve this open problem by using the same Follow-the-Regularized-Leader (FTRL) framework together with a set of new techniques. Specifically, we first propose a loss-shifting trick in the FTRL analysis, which greatly simplifies the approach of [Jin and Luo, 2020] and already improves their results for the known transition case. Then, we extend this idea to the unknown transition case and develop a novel analysis which upper bounds the transition estimation error by the regret itself in the stochastic setting, a key property to ensure $\mathcal{O}(\log T)$ regret.
Alexander Matt Turner, Logan Riggs Smith, Rohin Shah, Andrew Critch, Prasad Tadepalli
tl;dr: Power-seeking incentives arise from certain symmetries in the agent's environment.
Some researchers speculate that intelligent reinforcement learning (RL) agents would be incentivized to seek resources and power in pursuit of the objectives we specify for them. Other researchers point out that RL agents need not have human-like power-seeking instincts. To clarify this discussion, we develop the first formal theory of the statistical tendencies of optimal policies. In the context of Markov decision processes, we prove that certain environmental symmetries are sufficient for optimal policies to tend to seek power over the environment. These symmetries exist in many environments in which the agent can be shut down or destroyed. We prove that in these environments, most reward functions make it optimal to seek power by keeping a range of options available and, when maximizing average reward, by navigating towards larger sets of potential terminal states.
Frances Ding, Moritz Hardt, John Miller, Ludwig Schmidt
Although the fairness community has recognized the importance of data, researchers in the area primarily rely on UCI Adult when it comes to tabular data. Derived from a 1994 US Census survey, this dataset has appeared in hundreds of research papers where it served as the basis for the development and comparison of many algorithmic fairness interventions. We reconstruct a superset of the UCI Adult data from available US Census sources and reveal idiosyncrasies of the UCI Adult dataset that limit its external validity. Our primary contribution is a suite of new datasets derived from US Census surveys that extend the existing data ecosystem for research on fair machine learning. We create prediction tasks relating to income, employment, health, transportation, and housing. The data span multiple years and all states of the United States, allowing researchers to study temporal shift and geographic variation. We highlight a broad initial sweep of new empirical insights relating to trade-offs between fairness criteria, performance of algorithmic interventions, and the role of distribution shift based on our new datasets. Our findings inform ongoing debates, challenge some existing narratives, and point to future research directions.
Yoon Kim
Sequence-to-sequence learning with neural networks has become the de facto standard for sequence modeling. This approach typically models the local distribution over the next element with a powerful neural network that can condition on arbitrary context. While flexible and performant, these models often require large datasets for training and can fail spectacularly on benchmarks designed to test for compositional generalization. This work explores an alternative, hierarchical approach to sequence-to-sequence learning with synchronous grammars, where each node in the target tree is transduced by a subset of nodes in the source tree. The source and target trees are treated as fully latent and marginalized out during training. We develop a neural parameterization of the grammar which enables parameter sharing over combinatorial structures without the need for manual feature engineering. We apply this latent neural grammar to various domains---a diagnostic language navigation task designed to test for compositional generalization (SCAN), style transfer, and small-scale machine translation---and find that it performs respectably compared to standard baselines.
Sivakanth Gopi, Yin Tat Lee, Lukas Wutschitz
tl;dr: A fast and accurate algorithm to compose privacy guarantees of differentially private algorithms.
We give a fast algorithm to compose privacy guarantees of differentially private (DP) algorithms to arbitrary accuracy. Our method is based on the notion of privacy loss random variables to quantify the privacy loss of DP algorithms. The running time and memory needed for our algorithm to approximate the privacy curve of a DP algorithm composed with itself $k$ times is $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{k})$. This improves over the best prior method by Koskela et al. (2020) which requires $\tilde{\Omega}(k^{1.5})$ running time. We demonstrate the utility of our algorithm by accurately computing the privacy loss of DP-SGD algorithm of Abadi et al. (2016) and showing that our algorithm speeds up the privacy computations by a few orders of magnitude compared to prior work, while maintaining similar accuracy.
Rohan Mukherjee, Yeming Wen, Dipak Chaudhari, Thomas Reps, Swarat Chaudhuri, Chris Jermaine
tl;dr: We proposed to tackle the long-horizon code generation challenge using weak supervision from a static program analyzer.
State-of-the-art neural models of source code tend to be evaluated on the generation of individual expressions and lines of code, and commonly fail on long-horizon tasks such as the generation of entire method bodies. We propose to address this deficiency using weak supervision from a static program analyzer. Our neurosymbolic method allows a deep generative model to symbolically compute, using calls to a static analysis tool, long-distance semantic relationships in the code that it has already generated. During training, the model observes these relationships and learns to generate programs conditioned on them. We apply our approach to the problem of generating entire Java methods given the remainder of the class that contains the method. Our experiments show that the approach substantially outperforms a state-of-the-art transformer and a model that explicitly tries to learn program semantics on this task, both in terms of producing programs free of basic semantic errors and in terms of syntactically matching the ground truth.
Dominic Gonschorek, Larissa Höfling, Klaudia P. Szatko, Katrin Franke, Timm Schubert, Benjamin Adric Dunn, Philipp Berens, David A. Klindt, Thomas Euler
tl;dr: We offer a flexible approach to remove inter-experimental variability and integrate datasets across experiments in systems neuroscience.
Integrating data from multiple experiments is common practice in systems neuroscience but it requires inter-experimental variability to be negligible compared to the biological signal of interest. This requirement is rarely fulfilled; systematic changes between experiments can drastically affect the outcome of complex analysis pipelines. Modern machine learning approaches designed to adapt models across multiple data domains offer flexible ways of removing inter-experimental variability where classical statistical methods often fail. While applications of these methods have been mostly limited to single-cell genomics, in this work, we develop a theoretical framework for domain adaptation in systems neuroscience. We implement this in an adversarial optimization scheme that removes inter-experimental variability while preserving the biological signal. We compare our method to previous approaches on a large-scale dataset of two-photon imaging recordings of retinal bipolar cell responses to visual stimuli. This dataset provides a unique benchmark as it contains biological signal from well-defined cell types that is obscured by large inter-experimental variability. In a supervised setting, we compare the generalization performance of cell type classifiers across experiments, which we validate with anatomical cell type distributions from electron microscopy data. In an unsupervised setting, we remove inter-experimental variability from the data which can then be fed into arbitrary downstream analyses. In both settings, we find that our method achieves the best trade-off between removing inter-experimental variability and preserving biological signal. Thus, we offer a flexible approach to remove inter-experimental variability and integrate datasets across experiments in systems neuroscience. Code available at https://github.com/eulerlab/rave.
David Lindner, Matteo Turchetta, Sebastian Tschiatschek, Kamil Ciosek, Andreas Krause
tl;dr: Improving sample efficiency of active reward learning by focusing on learning a good policy.
For many reinforcement learning (RL) applications, specifying a reward is difficult. In this paper, we consider an RL setting where the agent can obtain information about the reward only by querying an expert that can, for example, evaluate individual states or provide binary preferences over trajectories. From such expensive feedback, we aim to learn a model of the reward function that allows standard RL algorithms to achieve high expected return with as few expert queries as possible. For this purpose, we propose Information Directed Reward Learning (IDRL), which uses a Bayesian model of the reward function and selects queries that maximize the information gain about the difference in return between potentially optimal policies. In contrast to prior active reward learning methods designed for specific types of queries, IDRL naturally accommodates different query types. Moreover, by shifting the focus from reducing the reward approximation error to improving the policy induced by the reward model, it achieves similar or better performance with significantly fewer queries. We support our findings with extensive evaluations in multiple environments and with different types of queries.
Siyuan Zhang, Nan Jiang
tl;dr: We propose hyperparameter-free policy-selection algorithms for offline RL.
How to select between policies and value functions produced by different training algorithms in offline reinforcement learning (RL)---which is crucial for hyperparameter tuning---is an important open question. Existing approaches based on off-policy evaluation (OPE) often require additional function approximation and hence hyperparameters, creating a chicken-and-egg situation. In this paper, we design hyperparameter-free algorithms for policy selection based on BVFT [XJ21], a recent theoretical advance in value-function selection, and demonstrate their effectiveness in discrete-action benchmarks such as Atari. To address performance degradation due to poor critics in continuous-action domains, we further combine BVFT with OPE to get the best of both worlds, and obtain a hyperparameter-tuning method for $Q$-function based OPE with theoretical guarantees as a side product.
Jiefeng Li, Tong Chen, Ruiqi Shi, Yujing Lou, Yong-Lu Li, Cewu Lu
tl;dr: We propose sampling-argmax, a differentiable training method that imposes implicit constraints to the shape of the probability map and facilitates localization.
Soft-argmax operation is commonly adopted in detection-based methods to localize the target position in a differentiable manner. However, training the neural network with soft-argmax makes the shape of the probability map unconstrained. Consequently, the model lacks pixel-wise supervision through the map during training, leading to performance degradation. In this work, we propose sampling-argmax, a differentiable training method that imposes implicit constraints to the shape of the probability map by minimizing the expectation of the localization error. To approximate the expectation, we introduce a continuous formulation of the output distribution and develop a differentiable sampling process. The expectation can be approximated by calculating the average error of all samples drawn from the output distribution. We show that sampling-argmax can seamlessly replace the conventional soft-argmax operation on various localization tasks. Comprehensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and flexibility of the proposed method. Code is available at https://github.com/Jeff-sjtu/sampling-argmax
Yanjun Han, Soham Jana, Yihong Wu
tl;dr: We study a prediction problem on Markov chains with finite state space and obtain optimal minimax rates.
We study the following learning problem with dependent data: Given a trajectory of length $n$ from a stationary Markov chain with $k$ states, the goal is to predict the distribution of the next state. For $3 \leq k \leq O(\sqrt{n})$, the optimal prediction risk in the Kullback-Leibler divergence is shown to be $\Theta(\frac{k^2}{n}\log \frac{n}{k^2})$, in contrast to the optimal rate of $\Theta(\frac{\log \log n}{n})$ for $k=2$ previously shown in Falahatgar et al in 2016. These nonparametric rates can be attributed to the memory in the data, as the spectral gap of the Markov chain can be arbitrarily small. To quantify the memory effect, we study irreducible reversible chains with a prescribed spectral gap. In addition to characterizing the optimal prediction risk for two states, we show that, as long as the spectral gap is not excessively small, the prediction risk in the Markov model is $O(\frac{k^2}{n})$, which coincides with that of an iid model with the same number of parameters.
Jean Tarbouriech, Runlong Zhou, Simon Shaolei Du, Matteo Pirotta, Michal Valko, Alessandro Lazaric
tl;dr: We derive a new learning algorithm for stochastic shortest path, whose regret guarantee is 1) simultaneously (nearly) minimax and parameter-free, and 2) (nearly) horizon-free in various cases.
We study the problem of learning in the stochastic shortest path (SSP) setting, where an agent seeks to minimize the expected cost accumulated before reaching a goal state. We design a novel model-based algorithm EB-SSP that carefully skews the empirical transitions and perturbs the empirical costs with an exploration bonus to induce an optimistic SSP problem whose associated value iteration scheme is guaranteed to converge. We prove that EB-SSP achieves the minimax regret rate $\widetilde{O}(B_{\star} \sqrt{S A K})$, where $K$ is the number of episodes, $S$ is the number of states, $A$ is the number of actions and $B_{\star}$ bounds the expected cumulative cost of the optimal policy from any state, thus closing the gap with the lower bound. Interestingly, EB-SSP obtains this result while being parameter-free, i.e., it does not require any prior knowledge of $B_{\star}$, nor of $T_{\star}$, which bounds the expected time-to-goal of the optimal policy from any state. Furthermore, we illustrate various cases (e.g., positive costs, or general costs when an order-accurate estimate of $T_{\star}$ is available) where the regret only contains a logarithmic dependence on $T_{\star}$, thus yielding the first (nearly) horizon-free regret bound beyond the finite-horizon MDP setting.
Paria Rashidinejad, Banghua Zhu, Cong Ma, Jiantao Jiao, Stuart Russell
tl;dr: We propose a new offline RL framework under which we study adaptive minimax optimal algorithms, developed based on the pessimism principle in offline RL.
Offline (or batch) reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms seek to learn an optimal policy from a fixed dataset without active data collection. Based on the composition of the offline dataset, two main methods are used: imitation learning which is suitable for expert datasets, and vanilla offline RL which often requires uniform coverage datasets. From a practical standpoint, datasets often deviate from these two extremes and the exact data composition is usually unknown. To bridge this gap, we present a new offline RL framework that smoothly interpolates between the two extremes of data composition, hence unifying imitation learning and vanilla offline RL. The new framework is centered around a weak version of the concentrability coefficient that measures the deviation of the behavior policy from the expert policy alone. Under this new framework, we ask: can one develop an algorithm that achieves a minimax optimal rate adaptive to unknown data composition? To address this question, we consider a lower confidence bound (LCB) algorithm developed based on pessimism in the face of uncertainty in offline RL. We study finite-sample properties of LCB as well as information-theoretic limits in multi-armed bandits, contextual bandits, and Markov decision processes (MDPs). Our analysis reveals surprising facts about optimality rates. In particular, in both contextual bandits and RL, LCB achieves a faster rate of $1/N$ for nearly-expert datasets compared to the usual rate of $1/\sqrt{N}$ in offline RL, where $N$ is the batch dataset sample size. In contextual bandits with at least two contexts, we prove that LCB is adaptively optimal for the entire data composition range, achieving a smooth transition from imitation learning to offline RL. We further show that LCB is almost adaptively optimal in MDPs.
Mycal Tucker, Huao Li, Siddharth Agrawal, Dana Hughes, Katia P. Sycara, Michael Lewis, Julie Shah
tl;dr: Instead of using one-hot tokens in emergent discrete communication, we enable agents to learn tokens within a semantic space, enabling greater robustness and zero-shot understanding of new communication
Neural agents trained in reinforcement learning settings can learn to communicate among themselves via discrete tokens, accomplishing as a team what agents would be unable to do alone. However, the current standard of using one-hot vectors as discrete communication tokens prevents agents from acquiring more desirable aspects of communication such as zero-shot understanding. Inspired by word embedding techniques from natural language processing, we propose neural agent architectures that enables them to communicate via discrete tokens derived from a learned, continuous space. We show in a decision theoretic framework that our technique optimizes communication over a wide range of scenarios, whereas one-hot tokens are only optimal under restrictive assumptions. In self-play experiments, we validate that our trained agents learn to cluster tokens in semantically-meaningful ways, allowing them communicate in noisy environments where other techniques fail. Lastly, we demonstrate both that agents using our method can effectively respond to novel human communication and that humans can understand unlabeled emergent agent communication, outperforming the use of one-hot communication.
Noah Golowich, Roi Livni
tl;dr: We provide a differentially private online learning algorithm for Littlestone classes with finite mistake bound.
We consider the problem of online classification under a privacy constraint. In this setting a learner observes sequentially a stream of labelled examples $(x_t, y_t)$, for $1 \leq t \leq T$, and returns at each iteration $t$ a hypothesis $h_t$ which is used to predict the label of each new example $x_t$. The learner's performance is measured by her regret against a known hypothesis class $\mathcal{H}$. We require that the algorithm satisfies the following privacy constraint: the sequence $h_1, \ldots, h_T$ of hypotheses output by the algorithm needs to be an $(\epsilon, \delta)$-differentially private function of the whole input sequence $(x_1, y_1), \ldots, (x_T, y_T)$. We provide the first non-trivial regret bound for the realizable setting. Specifically, we show that if the class $\mathcal{H}$ has constant Littlestone dimension then, given an oblivious sequence of labelled examples, there is a private learner that makes in expectation at most $O(\log T)$ mistakes -- comparable to the optimal mistake bound in the non-private case, up to a logarithmic factor. Moreover, for general values of the Littlestone dimension $d$, the same mistake bound holds but with a doubly-exponential in $d$ factor. A recent line of work has demonstrated a strong connection between classes that are online learnable and those that are differentially-private learnable. Our results strengthen this connection and show that an online learning algorithm can in fact be directly privatized (in the realizable setting). We also discuss an adaptive setting and provide a sublinear regret bound of $O(\sqrt{T})$.
Zhi Zhou, Lan-Zhe Guo, Zhanzhan Cheng, Yu-Feng Li, Shiliang Pu
tl;dr: We utilize the self-supervised representations and local topological structures to enhance the out-of-distribution detection ability of the model.
Existing semi-supervised learning (SSL) studies typically assume that unlabeled and test data are drawn from the same distribution as labeled data. However, in many real-world applications, it is desirable to have SSL algorithms that not only classify the samples drawn from the same distribution of labeled data but also detect out-of-distribution (OOD) samples drawn from an unknown distribution. In this paper, we study a setting called semi-supervised OOD detection. Two main challenges compared with previous OOD detection settings are i) the lack of labeled data and in-distribution data; ii) OOD samples could be unseen during training. Efforts on this direction remain limited. In this paper, we present an approach STEP significantly improving OOD detection performance by introducing a new technique: Structure-Keep Unzipping. It learns a new representation space in which OOD samples could be separated well. An efficient optimization algorithm is derived to solve the objective. Comprehensive experiments across various OOD detection benchmarks clearly show that our STEP approach outperforms other methods by a large margin and achieves remarkable detection performance on several benchmarks.
Stephen Roller, Sainbayar Sukhbaatar, Arthur Szlam, Jason E Weston
tl;dr: Proposes to use hashing to select model parameters per input for effective large, sparse Transformer models.
We investigate the training of sparse layers that use different parameters for different inputs based on hashing in large Transformer models. Specifically, we modify the feedforward layer to hash to different sets of weights depending on the current token, over all tokens in the sequence. We show that this procedure either outperforms or is competitive with learning-to-route mixture-of-expert methods such as Switch Transformers and BASE Layers, while requiring no routing parameters or extra terms in the objective function such as a load balancing loss, and no sophisticated assignment algorithm. We study the performance of different hashing techniques, hash sizes and input features, and show that balanced and random hashes focused on the most local features work best, compared to either learning clusters or using longer-range context. We show our approach works well both on large language modeling and dialogue tasks, and on downstream fine-tuning tasks.
Tung Mai, Cameron N Musco, Anup Rao
tl;dr: We use Lewis weight sampling to give improved coresets for logistic and hinge loss regression.
We give relative error coresets for training linear classifiers with a broad class of loss functions, including the logistic loss and hinge loss. Our construction achieves $(1\pm \epsilon)$ relative error with $\tilde O(d \cdot \mu_y(X)^2/\epsilon^2)$ points, where $\mu_y(X)$ is a natural complexity measure of the data matrix $X \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times d}$ and label vector $y \in \{-1,1\}^n$, introduced by Munteanu et al. 2018. Our result is based on subsampling data points with probabilities proportional to their $\ell_1$ $Lewis$ $weights$. It significantly improves on existing theoretical bounds and performs well in practice, outperforming uniform subsampling along with other importance sampling methods. Our sampling distribution does not depend on the labels, so can be used for active learning. It also does not depend on the specific loss function, so a single coreset can be used in multiple training scenarios.
Matthew Christopher Fontaine, Stefanos Nikolaidis
tl;dr: We present the differentiable quality diversity (DQD) problem and the first DQD algorithm.
Quality diversity (QD) is a growing branch of stochastic optimization research that studies the problem of generating an archive of solutions that maximize a given objective function but are also diverse with respect to a set of specified measure functions. However, even when these functions are differentiable, QD algorithms treat them as "black boxes", ignoring gradient information. We present the differentiable quality diversity (DQD) problem, a special case of QD, where both the objective and measure functions are first order differentiable. We then present MAP-Elites via a Gradient Arborescence (MEGA), a DQD algorithm that leverages gradient information to efficiently explore the joint range of the objective and measure functions. Results in two QD benchmark domains and in searching the latent space of a StyleGAN show that MEGA significantly outperforms state-of-the-art QD algorithms, highlighting DQD's promise for efficient quality diversity optimization when gradient information is available. Source code is available at https://github.com/icaros-usc/dqd.
Tian Ye, Simon Shaolei Du
tl;dr: First global convergence proof of gradient descent for asymmetric low-rank matrix factorization with a polynomial rate.
We study the asymmetric low-rank factorization problem: \[\min_{\mathbf{U} \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times d}, \mathbf{V} \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times d}} \frac{1}{2}\|\mathbf{U}\mathbf{V}^\top -\mathbf{\Sigma}\|_F^2\] where $\mathbf{\Sigma}$ is a given matrix of size $m \times n$ and rank $d$. This is a canonical problem that admits two difficulties in optimization: 1) non-convexity and 2) non-smoothness (due to unbalancedness of $\mathbf{U}$ and $\mathbf{V}$). This is also a prototype for more complex problems such as asymmetric matrix sensing and matrix completion. Despite being non-convex and non-smooth, it has been observed empirically that the randomly initialized gradient descent algorithm can solve this problem in polynomial time. Existing theories to explain this phenomenon all require artificial modifications of the algorithm, such as adding noise in each iteration and adding a balancing regularizer to balance the $\mathbf{U}$ and $\mathbf{V}$. This paper presents the first proof that shows randomly initialized gradient descent converges to a global minimum of the asymmetric low-rank factorization problem with a polynomial rate. For the proof, we develop 1) a new symmetrization technique to capture the magnitudes of the symmetry and asymmetry, and 2) a quantitative perturbation analysis to approximate matrix derivatives. We believe both are useful for other related non-convex problems.
Zhihui Zhu, Tianyu DING, Jinxin Zhou, Xiao Li, Chong You, Jeremias Sulam, Qing Qu
We provide the first global optimization landscape analysis of Neural Collapse -- an intriguing empirical phenomenon that arises in the last-layer classifiers and features of neural networks during the terminal phase of training. As recently reported by Papyan et al., this phenomenon implies that (i) the class means and the last-layer classifiers all collapse to the vertices of a Simplex Equiangular Tight Frame (ETF) up to scaling, and (ii) cross-example within-class variability of last-layer activations collapses to zero. We study the problem based on a simplified unconstrained feature model, which isolates the topmost layers from the classifier of the neural network. In this context, we show that the classical cross-entropy loss with weight decay has a benign global landscape, in the sense that the only global minimizers are the Simplex ETFs while all other critical points are strict saddles whose Hessian exhibit negative curvature directions. Our analysis of the simplified model not only explains what kind of features are learned in the last layer, but also shows why they can be efficiently optimized, matching the empirical observations in practical deep network architectures. These findings provide important practical implications. As an example, our experiments demonstrate that one may set the feature dimension equal to the number of classes and fix the last-layer classifier to be a Simplex ETF for network training, which reduces memory cost by over 20% on ResNet18 without sacrificing the generalization performance. The source code is available at https://github.com/tding1/Neural-Collapse.
Valentin De Bortoli, James Thornton, Jeremy Heng, Arnaud Doucet
tl;dr: A novel method for the Schrödinger Bridge problem with applications in score-based generative modeling.
Progressively applying Gaussian noise transforms complex data distributions to approximately Gaussian. Reversing this dynamic defines a generative model. When the forward noising process is given by a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE), Song et al (2021) demonstrate how the time inhomogeneous drift of the associated reverse-time SDE may be estimated using score-matching. A limitation of this approach is that the forward-time SDE must be run for a sufficiently long time for the final distribution to be approximately Gaussian. In contrast, solving the Schrödinger Bridge (SB) problem, i.e. an entropy-regularized optimal transport problem on path spaces, yields diffusions which generate samples from the data distribution in finite time. We present Diffusion SB (DSB), an original approximation of the Iterative Proportional Fitting (IPF) procedure to solve the SB problem, and provide theoretical analysis along with generative modeling experiments. The first DSB iteration recovers the methodology proposed by Song et al. (2021), with the flexibility of using shorter time intervals, as subsequent DSB iterations reduce the discrepancy between the final-time marginal of the forward (resp. backward) SDE with respect to the prior (resp. data) distribution. Beyond generative modeling, DSB offers a widely applicable computational optimal transport tool as the continuous state-space analogue of the popular Sinkhorn algorithm (Cuturi, 2013).
Bingcong Li, Alireza Sadeghi, Georgios B. Giannakis
tl;dr: Heavy ball momentum tightens the primal dual error of Frank-Wolfe (aka conditional gradient) method.
Conditional gradient, aka Frank Wolfe (FW) algorithms, have well-documented merits in machine learning and signal processing applications. Unlike projection-based methods, momentum cannot improve the convergence rate of FW, in general. This limitation motivates the present work, which deals with heavy ball momentum, and its impact to FW. Specifically, it is established that heavy ball offers a unifying perspective on the primal-dual (PD) convergence, and enjoys a tighter \textit{per iteration} PD error rate, for multiple choices of step sizes, where PD error can serve as the stopping criterion in practice. In addition, it is asserted that restart, a scheme typically employed jointly with Nesterov's momentum, can further tighten this PD error bound. Numerical results demonstrate the usefulness of heavy ball momentum in FW iterations.
Gavin R Brown, Marco Gaboardi, Adam Smith, Jonathan Ullman, Lydia Zakynthinou
tl;dr: We design differentially private mean estimators for $d$-dimensional (sub)Gaussian distributions with unknown covariance which have nearly optimal sample complexity guarantees.
We present two sample-efficient differentially private mean estimators for $d$-dimensional (sub)Gaussian distributions with unknown covariance. Informally, given $n \gtrsim d/\alpha^2$ samples from such a distribution with mean $\mu$ and covariance $\Sigma$, our estimators output $\tilde\mu$ such that $\| \tilde\mu - \mu \|_{\Sigma} \leq \alpha$, where $\| \cdot \|_{\Sigma}$ is the \emph{Mahalanobis distance}. All previous estimators with the same guarantee either require strong a priori bounds on the covariance matrix or require $\Omega(d^{3/2})$ samples. Each of our estimators is based on a simple, general approach to designing differentially private mechanisms, but with novel technical steps to make the estimator private and sample-efficient. Our first estimator samples a point with approximately maximum Tukey depth using the exponential mechanism, but restricted to the set of points of large Tukey depth. Proving that this mechanism is private requires a novel analysis. Our second estimator perturbs the empirical mean of the data set with noise calibrated to the empirical covariance. Only the mean is released, however; the covariance is only used internally. Its sample complexity guarantees hold more generally for subgaussian distributions, albeit with a slightly worse dependence on the privacy parameter. For both estimators, careful preprocessing of the data is required to satisfy differential privacy.
Yegor Klochkov, Nikita Zhivotovskiy
tl;dr: The first high-probability deviation risk bounds for uniformly stable algorithms with nearly optimal rate $O(\log n/ n)$
The sharpest known high probability generalization bounds for uniformly stable algorithms (Feldman, Vondrak, NeurIPS 2018, COLT, 2019), (Bousquet, Klochkov, Zhivotovskiy, COLT, 2020) contain a generally inevitable sampling error term of order $\Theta(1/\sqrt{n})$. When applied to excess risk bounds, this leads to suboptimal results in several standard stochastic convex optimization problems. We show that if the so-called Bernstein condition is satisfied, the term $\Theta(1/\sqrt{n})$ can be avoided, and high probability excess risk bounds of order up to $O(1/n)$ are possible via uniform stability. Using this result, we show a high probability excess risk bound with the rate $O(\log n/n)$ for strongly convex and Lipschitz losses valid for \emph{any} empirical risk minimization method. This resolves a question of Shalev-Shwartz, Shamir, Srebro, and Sridharan (COLT, 2009). We discuss how $O(\log n/n)$ high probability excess risk bounds are possible for projected gradient descent in the case of strongly convex and Lipschitz losses without the usual smoothness assumption.
Matthew Fellows, Kristian Hartikainen, Shimon Whiteson
We introduce a novel perspective on Bayesian reinforcement learning (RL); whereas existing approaches infer a posterior over the transition distribution or Q-function, we characterise the uncertainty in the Bellman operator. Our Bayesian Bellman operator (BBO) framework is motivated by the insight that when bootstrapping is introduced, model-free approaches actually infer a posterior over Bellman operators, not value functions. In this paper, we use BBO to provide a rigorous theoretical analysis of model-free Bayesian RL to better understand its relationship to established frequentist RL methodologies. We prove that Bayesian solutions are consistent with frequentist RL solutions, even when approximate inference is used, and derive conditions for which convergence properties hold. Empirically, we demonstrate that algorithms derived from the BBO framework have sophisticated deep exploration properties that enable them to solve continuous control tasks at which state-of-the-art regularised actor-critic algorithms fail catastrophically.
Anand Kalvit, assaf zeevi
tl;dr: This paper provides the first complete characterization of the arm-sampling distributions under UCB as a function of the problem hardness.
One of the key drivers of complexity in the classical (stochastic) multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem is the difference between mean rewards in the top two arms, also known as the instance gap. The celebrated Upper Confidence Bound (UCB) policy is among the simplest optimism-based MAB algorithms that naturally adapts to this gap: for a horizon of play n, it achieves optimal O(log n) regret in instances with "large" gaps, and a near-optimal O(\sqrt{n log n}) minimax regret when the gap can be arbitrarily "small." This paper provides new results on the arm-sampling behavior of UCB, leading to several important insights. Among these, it is shown that arm-sampling rates under UCB are asymptotically deterministic, regardless of the problem complexity. This discovery facilitates new sharp asymptotics and a novel alternative proof for the O(\sqrt{n log n}) minimax regret of UCB. Furthermore, the paper also provides the first complete process-level characterization of the MAB problem in the conventional diffusion scaling. Among other things, the "small" gap worst-case lens adopted in this paper also reveals profound distinctions between the behavior of UCB and Thompson Sampling, such as an "incomplete learning" phenomenon characteristic of the latter.
Mitchell Plyler, Michael A Green, Min Chi
tl;dr: A counterfactual data augmentation scheme to lower the mutual information between spurious signals and the target label.
Rationales, snippets of extracted text that explain an inference, have emerged as a popular framework for interpretable natural language processing (NLP). Rationale models typically consist of two cooperating modules: a selector and a classifier with the goal of maximizing the mutual information (MMI) between the "selected" text and the document label. Despite their promises, MMI-based methods often pick up on spurious text patterns and result in models with nonsensical behaviors. In this work, we investigate whether counterfactual data augmentation (CDA), without human assistance, can improve the performance of the selector by lowering the mutual information between spurious signals and the document label. Our counterfactuals are produced in an unsupervised fashion using class-dependent generative models. From an information theoretic lens, we derive properties of the unaugmented dataset for which our CDA approach would succeed. The effectiveness of CDA is empirically evaluated by comparing against several baselines including an improved MMI-based rationale schema on two multi-aspect datasets. Our results show that CDA produces rationales that better capture the signal of interest.
Jeff Z. HaoChen, Colin Wei, Adrien Gaidon, Tengyu Ma
tl;dr: We propose a novel theoretical framework for studying self-supervised learning algorithms.
Recent works in self-supervised learning have advanced the state-of-the-art by relying on the contrastive learning paradigm, which learns representations by pushing positive pairs, or similar examples from the same class, closer together while keeping negative pairs far apart. Despite the empirical successes, theoretical foundations are limited -- prior analyses assume conditional independence of the positive pairs given the same class label, but recent empirical applications use heavily correlated positive pairs (i.e., data augmentations of the same image). Our work analyzes contrastive learning without assuming conditional independence of positive pairs using a novel concept of the augmentation graph on data. Edges in this graph connect augmentations of the same data, and ground-truth classes naturally form connected sub-graphs. We propose a loss that performs spectral decomposition on the population augmentation graph and can be succinctly written as a contrastive learning objective on neural net representations. Minimizing this objective leads to features with provable accuracy guarantees under linear probe evaluation. By standard generalization bounds, these accuracy guarantees also hold when minimizing the training contrastive loss. In all, this work provides the first provable analysis for contrastive learning where the guarantees can apply to realistic empirical settings.
Jonathan Crabbé, Zhaozhi Qian, Fergus Imrie, Mihaela van der Schaar
tl;dr: We introduce SimplEx, a method that decomposes latent representations of test examples in terms of the representations of a corpus of examples.
Modern machine learning models are complicated. Most of them rely on convoluted latent representations of their input to issue a prediction. To achieve greater transparency than a black-box that connects inputs to predictions, it is necessary to gain a deeper understanding of these latent representations. To that aim, we propose SimplEx: a user-centred method that provides example-based explanations with reference to a freely selected set of examples, called the corpus. SimplEx uses the corpus to improve the user’s understanding of the latent space with post-hoc explanations answering two questions: (1) Which corpus examples explain the prediction issued for a given test example? (2) What features of these corpus examples are relevant for the model to relate them to the test example? SimplEx provides an answer by reconstructing the test latent representation as a mixture of corpus latent representations. Further, we propose a novel approach, the integrated Jacobian, that allows SimplEx to make explicit the contribution of each corpus feature in the mixture. Through experiments on tasks ranging from mortality prediction to image classification, we demonstrate that these decompositions are robust and accurate. With illustrative use cases in medicine, we show that SimplEx empowers the user by highlighting relevant patterns in the corpus that explain model representations. Moreover, we demonstrate how the freedom in choosing the corpus allows the user to have personalized explanations in terms of examples that are meaningful for them.
Zhaozhi Qian, Alicia Curth, Mihaela van der Schaar
Most existing methods for conditional average treatment effect estimation are designed to estimate the effect of a single cause - only one variable can be intervened on at one time. However, many applications involve simultaneous intervention on multiple variables, which leads to multi-cause treatment effect problems. The multi-cause problem is challenging because one needs to overcome the confounding bias for a large number of treatment groups, each with a different cause combination. The combinatorial nature of the problem also leads to severe data scarcity - we only observe one factual outcome out of many potential outcomes. In this work, we propose Single-cause Perturbation (SCP), a novel two-step procedure to estimate the multi-cause treatment effect. SCP starts by augmenting the observational dataset with the estimated potential outcomes under single-cause interventions. It then performs covariate adjustment on the augmented dataset to obtain the estimator. SCP is agnostic to the exact choice of algorithm in either step. We show formally that the procedure is valid under standard assumptions in causal inference. We demonstrate the performance gain of SCP on extensive synthetic and semi-synthetic experiments.
Daniel Kumor, Junzhe Zhang, Elias Bareinboim
tl;dr: We provide a complete graphical condition for determining feasibility of sequential imitation in the presence of latent confounding
"Monkey see monkey do" is an age-old adage, referring to naive imitation without a deep understanding of a system's underlying mechanics. Indeed, if a demonstrator has access to information unavailable to the imitator (monkey), such as a different set of sensors, then no matter how perfectly the imitator models its perceived environment (See), attempting to directly reproduce the demonstrator's behavior (Do) can lead to poor outcomes. Imitation learning in the presence of a mismatch between demonstrator and imitator has been studied in the literature under the rubric of causal imitation learning (Zhang et. al. 2020), but existing solutions are limited to single-stage decision-making. This paper investigates the problem of causal imitation learning in sequential settings, where the imitator must make multiple decisions per episode. We develop a graphical criterion that is both necessary and sufficient for determining the feasibility of causal imitation, providing conditions when an imitator can match a demonstrator's performance despite differing capabilities. Finally, we provide an efficient algorithm for determining imitability, and corroborate our theory with simulations.
Shifeng Zhang, Ning Kang, Tom Ryder, Zhenguo Li
It was estimated that the world produced $59 ZB$ ($5.9 \times 10^{13} GB$) of data in 2020, resulting in the enormous costs of both data storage and transmission. Fortunately, recent advances in deep generative models have spearheaded a new class of so-called "neural compression" algorithms, which significantly outperform traditional codecs in terms of compression ratio. Unfortunately, the application of neural compression garners little commercial interest due to its limited bandwidth; therefore, developing highly efficient frameworks is of critical practical importance. In this paper, we discuss lossless compression using normalizing flows which have demonstrated a great capacity for achieving high compression ratios. As such, we introduce iFlow, a new method for achieving efficient lossless compression. We first propose Modular Scale Transform (MST) and a novel family of numerically invertible flow transformations based on MST. Then we introduce the Uniform Base Conversion System (UBCS), a fast uniform-distribution codec incorporated into iFlow, enabling efficient compression. iFlow achieves state-of-the-art compression ratios and is $5 \times$ quicker than other high-performance schemes. Furthermore, the techniques presented in this paper can be used to accelerate coding time for a broad class of flow-based algorithms.
Junnan Li, Ramprasaath R. Selvaraju, Akhilesh Deepak Gotmare, Shafiq Joty, Caiming Xiong, Steven Hoi
tl;dr: We propose aligning image and text representations using contrastive learning to enable better image-text interactions with a multimodal transformer encoder, which leads to superior vision-language representations for multiple downstream tasks.
Large-scale vision and language representation learning has shown promising improvements on various vision-language tasks. Most existing methods employ a transformer-based multimodal encoder to jointly model visual tokens (region-based image features) and word tokens. Because the visual tokens and word tokens are unaligned, it is challenging for the multimodal encoder to learn image-text interactions. In this paper, we introduce a contrastive loss to ALign the image and text representations BEfore Fusing (ALBEF) them through cross-modal attention, which enables more grounded vision and language representation learning. Unlike most existing methods, our method does not require bounding box annotations nor high-resolution images. In order to improve learning from noisy web data, we propose momentum distillation, a self-training method which learns from pseudo-targets produced by a momentum model. We provide a theoretical analysis of ALBEF from a mutual information maximization perspective, showing that different training tasks can be interpreted as different ways to generate views for an image-text pair. ALBEF achieves state-of-the-art performance on multiple downstream vision-language tasks. On image-text retrieval, ALBEF outperforms methods that are pre-trained on orders of magnitude larger datasets. On VQA and NLVR$^2$, ALBEF achieves absolute improvements of 2.37% and 3.84% compared to the state-of-the-art, while enjoying faster inference speed. Code and models are available at https://github.com/salesforce/ALBEF.
Noam Rozen, Aditya Grover, Maximilian Nickel, Yaron Lipman
tl;dr: Introducing a novel generative model on manifolds based on a classical flow by Moser.
We are interested in learning generative models for complex geometries described via manifolds, such as spheres, tori, and other implicit surfaces. Current extensions of existing (Euclidean) generative models are restricted to specific geometries and typically suffer from high computational costs. We introduce Moser Flow (MF), a new class of generative models within the family of continuous normalizing flows (CNF). MF also produces a CNF via a solution to the change-of-variable formula, however differently from other CNF methods, its model (learned) density is parameterized as the source (prior) density minus the divergence of a neural network (NN). The divergence is a local, linear differential operator, easy to approximate and calculate on manifolds. Therefore, unlike other CNFs, MF does not require invoking or backpropagating through an ODE solver during training. Furthermore, representing the model density explicitly as the divergence of a NN rather than as a solution of an ODE facilitates learning high fidelity densities. Theoretically, we prove that MF constitutes a universal density approximator under suitable assumptions. Empirically, we demonstrate for the first time the use of flow models for sampling from general curved surfaces and achieve significant improvements in density estimation, sample quality, and training complexity over existing CNFs on challenging synthetic geometries and real-world benchmarks from the earth and climate sciences.
Sandesh Ghimire, Aria Masoomi, Jennifer Dy
tl;dr: We propose a new way to construct neural function such that it lies on RKHS; and use this function as discriminator to compute KL divergence from samples. We provide theoretical insights and consistency guarantee of the KL estimator.
Estimating Kullback–Leibler (KL) divergence from samples of two distributions is essential in many machine learning problems. Variational methods using neural network discriminator have been proposed to achieve this task in a scalable manner. However, we noticed that most of these methods using neural network discriminators suffer from high fluctuations (variance) in estimates and instability in training. In this paper, we look at this issue from statistical learning theory and function space complexity perspective to understand why this happens and how to solve it. We argue that the cause of these pathologies is lack of control over the complexity of the neural network discriminator function and could be mitigated by controlling it. To achieve this objective, we 1) present a novel construction of the discriminator in the Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space (RKHS), 2) theoretically relate the error probability bound of the KL estimates to the complexity of the discriminator in the RKHS space, 3) present a scalable way to control the complexity (RKHS norm) of the discriminator for a reliable estimation of KL divergence, and 4) prove the consistency of the proposed estimator. In three different applications of KL divergence -- estimation of KL, estimation of mutual information and Variational Bayes -- we show that by controlling the complexity as developed in the theory, we are able to reduce the variance of KL estimates and stabilize the training.
Akifumi Wachi, Yunyue Wei, Yanan Sui
tl;dr: Formulate a safe reinforcement learning problem where features are locally available upon observation, and propose an algorithm with theoretical guarantee on optimality and safety, which can be applied to large-scale problems.
Safe exploration is a key to applying reinforcement learning (RL) in safety-critical systems. Existing safe exploration methods guaranteed safety under the assumption of regularity, and it has been difficult to apply them to large-scale real problems. We propose a novel algorithm, SPO-LF, that optimizes an agent's policy while learning the relation between a locally available feature obtained by sensors and environmental reward/safety using generalized linear function approximations. We provide theoretical guarantees on its safety and optimality. We experimentally show that our algorithm is 1) more efficient in terms of sample complexity and computational cost and 2) more applicable to large-scale problems than previous safe RL methods with theoretical guarantees, and 3) comparably sample-efficient and safer compared with existing advanced deep RL methods with safety constraints.
Ankit Garg, Robin Kothari, Praneeth Netrapalli, Suhail Sherif
tl;dr: We prove near optimal lower bounds for $p^{\textrm{th}}$ order smooth convex optimization for any $p \geq 1$ for both randomized and quantum algorithms.
We study the complexity of optimizing highly smooth convex functions. For a positive integer $p$, we want to find an $\epsilon$-approximate minimum of a convex function $f$, given oracle access to the function and its first $p$ derivatives, assuming that the $p$th derivative of $f$ is Lipschitz. Recently, three independent research groups (Jiang et al., PLMR 2019; Gasnikov et al., PLMR 2019; Bubeck et al., PLMR 2019) developed a new algorithm that solves this problem with $\widetilde{O}\left(1/\epsilon^{\frac{2}{3p+1}}\right)$ oracle calls for constant $p$. This is known to be optimal (up to log factors) for deterministic algorithms, but known lower bounds for randomized algorithms do not match this bound. We prove a new lower bound that matches this bound (up to log factors), and holds not only for randomized algorithms, but also for quantum algorithms.
Samuel Horváth, Stefanos Laskaridis, Mario Almeida, Ilias Leontiadis, Stylianos Venieris, Nicholas Donald Lane
tl;dr: FjORD is elastically scaling a networks footprint, via Ordered Dropout, to tackle system heterogeneity in Federated Learning.
Federated Learning (FL) has been gaining significant traction across different ML tasks, ranging from vision to keyboard predictions. In large-scale deployments, client heterogeneity is a fact and constitutes a primary problem for fairness, training performance and accuracy. Although significant efforts have been made into tackling statistical data heterogeneity, the diversity in the processing capabilities and network bandwidth of clients, termed system heterogeneity, has remained largely unexplored. Current solutions either disregard a large portion of available devices or set a uniform limit on the model's capacity, restricted by the least capable participants. In this work, we introduce Ordered Dropout, a mechanism that achieves an ordered, nested representation of knowledge in Neural Networks and enables the extraction of lower footprint submodels without the need for retraining. We further show that for linear maps our Ordered Dropout is equivalent to SVD. We employ this technique, along with a self-distillation methodology, in the realm of FL in a framework called FjORD. FjORD alleviates the problem of client system heterogeneity by tailoring the model width to the client's capabilities. Extensive evaluation on both CNNs and RNNs across diverse modalities shows that FjORD consistently leads to significant performance gains over state-of-the-art baselines while maintaining its nested structure.
Huan Ling, Karsten Kreis, Daiqing Li, Seung Wook Kim, Antonio Torralba, Sanja Fidler
tl;dr: Here, we propose EditGAN, a novel method for high-quality, high-precision semantic image editing, allowing users to edit images by modifying their highly detailed part segmentation masks.
Generative adversarial networks (GANs) have recently found applications in image editing. However, most GAN-based image editing methods often require large-scale datasets with semantic segmentation annotations for training, only provide high-level control, or merely interpolate between different images. Here, we propose EditGAN, a novel method for high-quality, high-precision semantic image editing, allowing users to edit images by modifying their highly detailed part segmentation masks, e.g., drawing a new mask for the headlight of a car. EditGAN builds on a GAN framework that jointly models images and their semantic segmentation, requiring only a handful of labeled examples – making it a scalable tool for editing. Specifically, we embed an image into the GAN’s latent space and perform conditional latent code optimization according to the segmentation edit, which effectively also modifies the image. To amortize optimization, we find “editing vectors” in latent space that realize the edits. The framework allows us to learn an arbitrary number of editing vectors, which can then be directly applied on other images at interactive rates. We experimentally show that EditGAN can manipulate images with an unprecedented level of detail and freedom while preserving full image quality. We can also easily combine multiple edits and perform plausible edits beyond EditGAN’s training data. We demonstrate EditGAN on a wide variety of image types and quantitatively outperform several previous editing methods on standard editing benchmark tasks.
Ruiqi Gao, Jianwen Xie, Xue-Xin Wei, Song-Chun Zhu, Ying Nian Wu
tl;dr: We conduct theoretical analysis of the recurrent model for path integration by grid cells. We learn clear hexagon grid patterns empirically from a linear prototype model via an optimization-based approach.
Understanding how grid cells perform path integration calculations remains a fundamental problem. In this paper, we conduct theoretical analysis of a general representation model of path integration by grid cells, where the 2D self-position is encoded as a higher dimensional vector, and the 2D self-motion is represented by a general transformation of the vector. We identify two conditions on the transformation. One is a group representation condition that is necessary for path integration. The other is an isotropic scaling condition that ensures locally conformal embedding, so that the error in the vector representation translates conformally to the error in the 2D self-position. Then we investigate the simplest transformation, i.e., the linear transformation, uncover its explicit algebraic and geometric structure as matrix Lie group of rotation, and explore the connection between the isotropic scaling condition and a special class of hexagon grid patterns. Finally, with our optimization-based approach, we manage to learn hexagon grid patterns that share similar properties of the grid cells in the rodent brain. The learned model is capable of accurate long distance path integration. Code is available at https://github.com/ruiqigao/grid-cell-path.
José Vinícius De Miranda Cardoso, Jiaxi Ying, Daniel P. Palomar
tl;dr: We propose specialized numerical algorithms for learning graphs of financial markets.
Heavy-tailed statistical distributions have long been considered a more realistic statistical model for the data generating process in financial markets in comparison to their Gaussian counterpart. Nonetheless, mathematical nuisances, including nonconvexities, involved in estimating graphs in heavy-tailed settings pose a significant challenge to the practical design of algorithms for graph learning. In this work, we present graph learning estimators based on the Markov random field framework that assume a Student-$t$ data generating process. We design scalable numerical algorithms, via the alternating direction method of multipliers, to learn both connected and $k$-component graphs along with their theoretical convergence guarantees. The proposed methods outperform state-of-the-art benchmarks in an extensive series of practical experiments with publicly available data from the S\&P500 index, foreign exchanges, and cryptocurrencies.
Po-An Wang, Ruo-Chun Tzeng, Alexandre Proutiere
We study the problem of active pure exploration with fixed confidence in generic stochastic bandit environments. The goal of the learner is to answer a query about the environment with a given level of certainty while minimizing her sampling budget. For this problem, instance-specific lower bounds on the expected sample complexity reveal the optimal proportions of arm draws an Oracle algorithm would apply. These proportions solve an optimization problem whose tractability strongly depends on the structural properties of the environment, but may be instrumental in the design of efficient learning algorithms. We devise Frank-Wolfe-based Sampling (FWS), a simple algorithm whose sample complexity matches the lower bounds for a wide class of pure exploration problems. The algorithm is computationally efficient as, to learn and track the optimal proportion of arm draws, it relies on a single iteration of Frank-Wolfe algorithm applied to the lower-bound optimization problem. We apply FWS to various pure exploration tasks, including best arm identification in unstructured, thresholded, linear, and Lipschitz bandits. Despite its simplicity, FWS is competitive compared to state-of-art algorithms.
Ning Xu, Congyu Qiao, Xin Geng, Min-Ling Zhang
tl;dr: We consider instance-dependent PLL and assume that each example is associated with a latent label distribution.
Partial label learning (PLL) is a typical weakly supervised learning problem, where each training example is associated with a set of candidate labels among which only one is true. Most existing PLL approaches assume that the incorrect labels in each training example are randomly picked as the candidate labels. However, this assumption is not realistic since the candidate labels are always instance-dependent. In this paper, we consider instance-dependent PLL and assume that each example is associated with a latent label distribution constituted by the real number of each label, representing the degree to each label describing the feature. The incorrect label with a high degree is more likely to be annotated as the candidate label. Therefore, the latent label distribution is the essential labeling information in partially labeled examples and worth being leveraged for predictive model training. Motivated by this consideration, we propose a novel PLL method that recovers the label distribution as a label enhancement (LE) process and trains the predictive model iteratively in every epoch. Specifically, we assume the true posterior density of the latent label distribution takes on the variational approximate Dirichlet density parameterized by an inference model. Then the evidence lower bound is deduced for optimizing the inference model and the label distributions generated from the variational posterior are utilized for training the predictive model. Experiments on benchmark and real-world datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Source code is available at https://github.com/palm-ml/valen.
Janardhan Kulkarni, Yin Tat Lee, Daogao Liu
tl;dr: The first private algorithms for SCO and ERM with optimal loss and subquadratic gradient queries
We study the differentially private Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) and Stochastic Convex Optimization (SCO) problems for non-smooth convex functions. We get a (nearly) optimal bound on the excess empirical risk for ERM with $O(\frac{N^{3/2}}{d^{1/8}}+ \frac{N^2}{d})$ gradient queries, which is achieved with the help of subsampling and smoothing the function via convolution. Combining this result with the iterative localization technique of Feldman et al. \cite{fkt20}, we achieve the optimal excess population loss for the SCO problem with $O(\min\{N^{5/4}d^{1/8},\frac{ N^{3/2}}{d^{1/8}}\})$ gradient queries. Our work makes progress towards resolving a question raised by Bassily et al. \cite{bfgt20}, giving first algorithms for private SCO with subquadratic steps. In a concurrent work, Asi et al. \cite{afkt21} gave other algorithms for private ERM and SCO with subquadratic steps.
Thomas A Langlois, Haicheng Charles Zhao, Erin Grant, Ishita Dasgupta, Thomas L. Griffiths, Nori Jacoby
tl;dr: We compare ANNs to humans using attention visualization techniques. We find that gradient-based attention visualizations obtained from a select class of networks predict human attention and saliency estimates derived from 6 distinct behavioral tasks.
Developments in machine learning interpretability techniques over the past decade have provided new tools to observe the image regions that are most informative for classification and localization in artificial neural networks (ANNs). Are the same regions similarly informative to human observers? Using data from 79 new experiments and 7,810 participants, we show that passive attention techniques reveal a significant overlap with human visual selectivity estimates derived from 6 distinct behavioral tasks including visual discrimination, spatial localization, recognizability, free-viewing, cued-object search, and saliency search fixations. We find that input visualizations derived from relatively simple ANN architectures probed using guided backpropagation methods are the best predictors of a shared component in the joint variability of the human measures. We validate these correlational results with causal manipulations using recognition experiments. We show that images masked with ANN attention maps were easier for humans to classify than control masks in a speeded recognition experiment. Similarly, we find that recognition performance in the same ANN models was likewise influenced by masking input images using human visual selectivity maps. This work contributes a new approach to evaluating the biological and psychological validity of leading ANNs as models of human vision: by examining their similarities and differences in terms of their visual selectivity to the information contained in images.
Serguei Barannikov, Ilya Trofimov, Grigorii Sotnikov, Ekaterina Trimbach, Alexander Korotin, Alexander Filippov, Evgeny Burnaev
tl;dr: We introduce a topology-based domain agnostic methodology for comparing data manifolds.
We propose a framework for comparing data manifolds, aimed, in particular, towards the evaluation of deep generative models. We describe a novel tool, Cross-Barcode(P,Q), that, given a pair of distributions in a high-dimensional space, tracks multiscale topology spacial discrepancies between manifolds on which the distributions are concentrated. Based on the Cross-Barcode, we introduce the Manifold Topology Divergence score (MTop-Divergence) and apply it to assess the performance of deep generative models in various domains: images, 3D-shapes, time-series, and on different datasets: MNIST, Fashion MNIST, SVHN, CIFAR10, FFHQ, market stock data, ShapeNet. We demonstrate that the MTop-Divergence accurately detects various degrees of mode-dropping, intra-mode collapse, mode invention, and image disturbance. Our algorithm scales well (essentially linearly) with the increase of the dimension of the ambient high-dimensional space. It is one of the first TDA-based methodologies that can be applied universally to datasets of different sizes and dimensions, including the ones on which the most recent GANs in the visual domain are trained. The proposed method is domain agnostic and does not rely on pre-trained networks.
Bin Dai, Li Kevin Wenliang, David Wipf
tl;dr: We demonstrate that infinite gradients, although perhaps at times difficult to address in practical, can serve a useful role in pruning the latent space of autoencoder-based models.
A number of recent studies of continuous variational autoencoder (VAE) models have noted, either directly or indirectly, the tendency of various parameter gradients to drift towards infinity during training. Because such gradients could potentially contribute to numerical instabilities, and are often framed as a problematic phenomena to be avoided, it may be tempting to shift to alternative energy functions that guarantee bounded gradients. But it remains an open question: What might the unintended consequences of such a restriction be? To address this issue, we examine how unbounded gradients relate to the regularization of a broad class of autoencoder-based architectures, including VAE models, as applied to data lying on or near a low-dimensional manifold (e.g., natural images). Our main finding is that, if the ultimate goal is to simultaneously avoid over-regularization (high reconstruction errors, sometimes referred to as posterior collapse) and under-regularization (excessive latent dimensions are not pruned from the model), then an autoencoder-based energy function with infinite gradients around optimal representations is provably required per a certain technical sense which we carefully detail. Given that both over- and under-regularization can directly lead to poor generated sample quality or suboptimal feature selection, this result suggests that heuristic modifications to or constraints on the VAE energy function may at times be ill-advised, and large gradients should be accommodated to the extent possible.
Despoina Paschalidou, Amlan Kar, Maria Shugrina, Karsten Kreis, Andreas Geiger, Sanja Fidler
tl;dr: We propose an autoregressive transformer architecture for indoor scene synthesis that generates room layouts as unordered sets of objects and allows for a variety of interactive applications with versatile user input.
The ability to synthesize realistic and diverse indoor furniture layouts automatically or based on partial input, unlocks many applications, from better interactive 3D tools to data synthesis for training and simulation. In this paper, we present ATISS, a novel autoregressive transformer architecture for creating diverse and plausible synthetic indoor environments, given only the room type and its floor plan. In contrast to prior work, which poses scene synthesis as sequence generation, our model generates rooms as unordered sets of objects. We argue that this formulation is more natural, as it makes ATISS generally useful beyond fully automatic room layout synthesis. For example, the same trained model can be used in interactive applications for general scene completion, partial room re-arrangement with any objects specified by the user, as well as object suggestions for any partial room. To enable this, our model leverages the permutation equivariance of the transformer when conditioning on the partial scene, and is trained to be permutation-invariant across object orderings. Our model is trained end-to-end as an autoregressive generative model using only labeled 3D bounding boxes as supervision. Evaluations on four room types in the 3D-FRONT dataset demonstrate that our model consistently generates plausible room layouts that are more realistic than existing methods. In addition, it has fewer parameters, is simpler to implement and train and runs up to 8 times faster than existing methods.
Jiaqi Gu, Hanqing Zhu, Chenghao Feng, Zixuan Jiang, Ray Chen, David Z. Pan
tl;dr: A scalable training framwork to enable efficient on-chip learning for optical neural networks
Silicon-photonics-based optical neural network (ONN) is a promising hardware platform that could represent a paradigm shift in efficient AI with its CMOS-compatibility, flexibility, ultra-low execution latency, and high energy efficiency. In-situ training on the online programmable photonic chips is appealing but still encounters challenging issues in on-chip implementability, scalability, and efficiency. In this work, we propose a closed-loop ONN on-chip learning framework L2ight to enable scalable ONN mapping and efficient in-situ learning. L2ight adopts a three-stage learning flow that first calibrates the complicated photonic circuit states under challenging physical constraints, then performs photonic core mapping via combined analytical solving and zeroth-order optimization. A subspace learning procedure with multi-level sparsity is integrated into L2ight to enable in-situ gradient evaluation and fast adaptation, unleashing the power of optics for real on-chip intelligence. Extensive experiments demonstrate our proposed L2ight outperforms prior ONN training protocols with 3-order-of-magnitude higher scalability and over 30x better efficiency, when benchmarked on various models and learning tasks. This synergistic framework is the first scalable on-chip learning solution that pushes this emerging field from intractable to scalable and further to efficient for next-generation self-learnable photonic neural chips. From a co-design perspective, L2ight also provides essential insights for hardware-restricted unitary subspace optimization and efficient sparse training. We open-source our framework at the link.
Ruosi Wan, Zhanxing Zhu, Xiangyu Zhang, Jian Sun
tl;dr: Theoretical and empirical analysis on learning dynamics of neural network with normalization and weight decay.
In this paper, we comprehensively reveal the learning dynamics of normalized neural network using Stochastic Gradient Descent (with momentum) and Weight Decay (WD), named as Spherical Motion Dynamics (SMD). Most related works focus on studying behavior of ``effective learning rate" in ``equilibrium" state, i.e. assuming weight norm remains unchanged. However, their discussion on why this equilibrium can be reached is either absent or less convincing. Our work directly explores the cause of equilibrium, as a special state of SMD. Specifically, 1) we introduce the assumptions that can lead to equilibrium state in SMD, and prove equilibrium can be reached in a linear rate regime under given assumptions; 2) we propose ``angular update" as a substitute for effective learning rate to depict the state of SMD, and derive the theoretical value of angular update in equilibrium state; 3) we verify our assumptions and theoretical results on various large-scale computer vision tasks including ImageNet and MSCOCO with standard settings. Experiment results show our theoretical findings agree well with empirical observations. We also show that the behavior of angular update in SMD can produce interesting effect to the optimization of neural network in practice.
reda ouhamma, Rémy Degenne, Vianney Perchet, Pierre Gaillard
tl;dr: We generalize the thresholding bandit setting and devise a generic algorithm as well as a proof methodology that also applies to existing algorithms in literature.
In the fixed budget thresholding bandit problem, an algorithm sequentially allocates a budgeted number of samples to different distributions. It then predicts whether the mean of each distribution is larger or lower than a given threshold. We introduce a large family of algorithms (containing most existing relevant ones), inspired by the Frank-Wolfe algorithm, and provide a thorough yet generic analysis of their performance. This allowed us to construct new explicit algorithms, for a broad class of problems, whose losses are within a small constant factor of the non-adaptive oracle ones. Quite interestingly, we observed that adaptive methods empirically greatly out-perform non-adaptive oracles, an uncommon behavior in standard online learning settings, such as regret minimization. We explain this surprising phenomenon on an insightful toy problem.
Ashok Cutkosky, Harsh Mehta
tl;dr: We show that combining momentum, normalization, and gradient clipping allows for high-probability convergence guarantees in non-convex stochastic optimization even in the presence of heavy-tailed gradient noise.
We consider non-convex stochastic optimization using first-order algorithms for which the gradient estimates may have heavy tails. We show that a combination of gradient clipping, momentum, and normalized gradient descent yields convergence to critical points in high-probability with best-known rates for smooth losses when the gradients only have bounded $\mathfrak{p}$th moments for some $\mathfrak{p}\in(1,2]$. We then consider the case of second-order smooth losses, which to our knowledge have not been studied in this setting, and again obtain high-probability bounds for any $\mathfrak{p}$. Moreover, our results hold for arbitrary smooth norms, in contrast to the typical SGD analysis which requires a Hilbert space norm. Further, we show that after a suitable "burn-in" period, the objective value will monotonically decrease for every iteration until a critical point is identified, which provides intuition behind the popular practice of learning rate "warm-up'' and also yields a last-iterate guarantee.
Cheng-I Lai, Yang Zhang, Alexander H. Liu, Shiyu Chang, Yi-Lun Liao, Yung-Sung Chuang, Kaizhi Qian, Sameer Khurana, David Daniel Cox, James R. Glass
tl;dr: A new pruning method for self-supervised speech recognition that achieves better performance than conventional pruning methods while using a fraction of the computational cost.
Self-supervised speech representation learning (speech SSL) has demonstrated the benefit of scale in learning rich representations for Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) with limited paired data, such as wav2vec 2.0. We investigate the existence of sparse subnetworks in pre-trained speech SSL models that achieve even better low-resource ASR results. However, directly applying widely adopted pruning methods such as the Lottery Ticket Hypothesis (LTH) is suboptimal in the computational cost needed. Moreover, we show that the discovered subnetworks yield minimal performance gain compared to the original dense network. We present Prune-Adjust-Re-Prune (PARP), which discovers and finetunes subnetworks for much better performance, while only requiring a single downstream ASR finetuning run. PARP is inspired by our surprising observation that subnetworks pruned for pre-training tasks need merely a slight adjustment to achieve a sizeable performance boost in downstream ASR tasks. Extensive experiments on low-resource ASR verify (1) sparse subnetworks exist in mono-lingual/multi-lingual pre-trained speech SSL, and (2) the computational advantage and performance gain of PARP over baseline pruning methods. In particular, on the 10min Librispeech split without LM decoding, PARP discovers subnetworks from wav2vec 2.0 with an absolute 10.9%/12.6% WER decrease compared to the full model. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of PARP via: cross-lingual pruning without any phone recognition degradation, the discovery of a multi-lingual subnetwork for 10 spoken languages in 1 finetuning run, and its applicability to pre-trained BERT/XLNet for natural language tasks1.
Gen Li, Laixi Shi, Yuxin Chen, Yuantao Gu, Yuejie Chi
tl;dr: This paper develops a model-free algorithm that is simultaneously regret-optimal and memory-efficient for a broad range of sample sizes.
Achieving sample efficiency in online episodic reinforcement learning (RL) requires optimally balancing exploration and exploitation. When it comes to a finite-horizon episodic Markov decision process with $S$ states, $A$ actions and horizon length $H$, substantial progress has been achieved towards characterizing the minimax-optimal regret, which scales on the order of $\sqrt{H^2SAT}$ (modulo log factors) with $T$ the total number of samples. While several competing solution paradigms have been proposed to minimize regret, they are either memory-inefficient, or fall short of optimality unless the sample size exceeds an enormous threshold (e.g., $S^6A^4 \,\mathrm{poly}(H)$ for existing model-free methods). To overcome such a large sample size barrier to efficient RL, we design a novel model-free algorithm, with space complexity $O(SAH)$, that achieves near-optimal regret as soon as the sample size exceeds the order of $SA\,\mathrm{poly}(H)$. In terms of this sample size requirement (also referred to the initial burn-in cost), our method improves --- by at least a factor of $S^5A^3$ --- upon any prior memory-efficient algorithm that is asymptotically regret-optimal. Leveraging the recently introduced variance reduction strategy (also called {\em reference-advantage decomposition}), the proposed algorithm employs an {\em early-settled} reference update rule, with the aid of two Q-learning sequences with upper and lower confidence bounds. The design principle of our early-settled variance reduction method might be of independent interest to other RL settings that involve intricate exploration-exploitation trade-offs.
Babhru Joshi, Xiaowei Li, Yaniv Plan, Ozgur Yilmaz
We consider the problem of recovering an unknown latent code vector under a known generative model. For a $d$-layer deep generative network $\mathcal{G}:\mathbb{R}^{n_0}\rightarrow \mathbb{R}^{n_d}$ with ReLU activation functions, let the observation be $\mathcal{G}(x)+\epsilon$ where $\epsilon$ is noise. We introduce a simple novel algorithm, Partially Linearized Update for Generative Inversion (PLUGIn), to estimate $x$ (and thus $\mathcal{G}(x)$). We prove that, when weights are Gaussian and layer widths $n_i \gtrsim 5^i n_0$ (up to log factors), the algorithm converges geometrically to a neighbourhood of $x$ with high probability. Note the inequality on layer widths allows $n_i>n_{i+1}$ when $i\geq 1$. To our knowledge, this is the first such result for networks with some contractive layers. After a sufficient number of iterations, the estimation errors for both $x$ and $\mathcal{G}(x)$ are at most in the order of $\sqrt{4^dn_0/n_d} \|\epsilon\|$. Thus, the algorithm can denoise when the expansion ratio $n_d/n_0$ is large. Numerical experiments on synthetic data and real data are provided to validate our theoretical results and to illustrate that the algorithm can effectively remove artifacts in an image.
Xiaolong Ma, Geng Yuan, Xuan Shen, Tianlong Chen, Xuxi Chen, Xiaohan Chen, Ning Liu, Minghai Qin, Sijia Liu, Zhangyang Wang, Yanzhi Wang
There have been long-standing controversies and inconsistencies over the experiment setup and criteria for identifying the "winning ticket" in literature. To reconcile such, we revisit the definition of lottery ticket hypothesis, with comprehensive and more rigorous conditions. Under our new definition, we show concrete evidence to clarify whether the winning ticket exists across the major DNN architectures and/or applications. Through extensive experiments, we perform quantitative analysis on the correlations between winning tickets and various experimental factors, and empirically study the patterns of our observations. We find that the key training hyperparameters, such as learning rate and training epochs, as well as the architecture characteristics such as capacities and residual connections, are all highly correlated with whether and when the winning tickets can be identified. Based on our analysis, we summarize a guideline for parameter settings in regards of specific architecture characteristics, which we hope to catalyze the research progress on the topic of lottery ticket hypothesis. Our codes are publicly available at: https://github.com/boone891214/sanity-check-LTH.
Ilja Kuzborskij, Csaba Szepesvari, Omar Rivasplata, Amal Rannen-Triki, Razvan Pascanu
Empirically it has been observed that the performance of deep neural networks steadily improves with increased model size, contradicting the classical view on overfitting and generalization. Recently, the double descent phenomenon has been proposed to reconcile this observation with theory, suggesting that the test error has a second descent when the model becomes sufficiently overparameterized, as the model size itself acts as an implicit regularizer. In this paper we add to the growing body of work in this space, providing a careful study of learning dynamics as a function of model size for the least squares scenario. We show an excess risk bound for the gradient descent solution of the least squares objective. The bound depends on the smallest non-zero eigenvalue of the sample covariance matrix of the input features, via a functional form that has the double descent behaviour. This gives a new perspective on the double descent curves reported in the literature, as our analysis of the excess risk allows to decouple the effect of optimization and generalization error. In particular, we find that in the case of noiseless regression, double descent is explained solely by optimization-related quantities, which was missed in studies focusing on the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse solution. We believe that our derivation provides an alternative view compared to existing works, shedding some light on a possible cause of this phenomenon, at least in the considered least squares setting. We empirically explore if our predictions hold for neural networks, in particular whether the spectrum of the sample covariance of features at intermediary hidden layers has a similar behaviour as the one predicted by our derivations in the least squares setting.
Zaiwei Chen, Siva Theja Maguluri, Sanjay Shakkottai, Karthikeyan Shanmugam
In TD-learning, off-policy sampling is known to be more practical than on-policy sampling, and by decoupling learning from data collection, it enables data reuse. It is known that policy evaluation has the interpretation of solving a generalized Bellman equation. In this paper, we derive finite-sample bounds for any general off-policy TD-like stochastic approximation algorithm that solves for the fixed-point of this generalized Bellman operator. Our key step is to show that the generalized Bellman operator is simultaneously a contraction mapping with respect to a weighted $\ell_p$-norm for each $p$ in $[1,\infty)$, with a common contraction factor. Off-policy TD-learning is known to suffer from high variance due to the product of importance sampling ratios. A number of algorithms (e.g. $Q^\pi(\lambda)$, Tree-Backup$(\lambda)$, Retrace$(\lambda)$, and $Q$-trace) have been proposed in the literature to address this issue. Our results immediately imply finite-sample bounds of these algorithms. In particular, we provide first-known finite-sample guarantees for $Q^\pi(\lambda)$, Tree-Backup$(\lambda)$, and Retrace$(\lambda)$, and improve the best known bounds of $Q$-trace in \citep{chen2021finite}. Moreover, we show the bias-variance trade-offs in each of these algorithms.
Jinxin Liu, Hao Shen, Donglin Wang, Yachen Kang, Qiangxing Tian
Unsupervised reinforcement learning aims to acquire skills without prior goal representations, where an agent automatically explores an open-ended environment to represent goals and learn the goal-conditioned policy. However, this procedure is often time-consuming, limiting the rollout in some potentially expensive target environments. The intuitive approach of training in another interaction-rich environment disrupts the reproducibility of trained skills in the target environment due to the dynamics shifts and thus inhibits direct transferring. Assuming free access to a source environment, we propose an unsupervised domain adaptation method to identify and acquire skills across dynamics. Particularly, we introduce a KL regularized objective to encourage emergence of skills, rewarding the agent for both discovering skills and aligning its behaviors respecting dynamics shifts. This suggests that both dynamics (source and target) shape the reward to facilitate the learning of adaptive skills. We also conduct empirical experiments to demonstrate that our method can effectively learn skills that can be smoothly deployed in target.
Gal Greshler, Tamar Rott Shaham, Tomer Michaeli
tl;dr: We present a model that generates audio waveforms after training on a single short example
Models for audio generation are typically trained on hours of recordings. Here, we illustrate that capturing the essence of an audio source is typically possible from as little as a few tens of seconds from a single training signal. Specifically, we present a GAN-based generative model that can be trained on one short audio signal from any domain (e.g. speech, music, etc.) and does not require pre-training or any other form of external supervision. Once trained, our model can generate random samples of arbitrary duration that maintain semantic similarity to the training waveform, yet exhibit new compositions of its audio primitives. This enables a long line of interesting applications, including generating new jazz improvisations or new a-cappella rap variants based on a single short example, producing coherent modifications to famous songs (e.g. adding a new verse to a Beatles song based solely on the original recording), filling-in of missing parts (inpainting), extending the bandwidth of a speech signal (super-resolution), and enhancing old recordings without access to any clean training example. We show that in all cases, no more than 20 seconds of training audio commonly suffice for our model to achieve state-of-the-art results. This is despite its complete lack of prior knowledge about the nature of audio signals in general.
Saurabh Garg, Yifan Wu, Alex Smola, Sivaraman Balakrishnan, Zachary Chase Lipton
tl;dr: Given only Positive (P) and Unlabeled (U) data, containing both P and Negative (N) samples, we propose new approaches to estimate fraction of P in U and learn P vs N classifier.
Given only positive examples and unlabeled examples (from both positive and negative classes), we might hope nevertheless to estimate an accurate positive-versus-negative classifier. Formally, this task is broken down into two subtasks: (i) Mixture Proportion Estimation (MPE)---determining the fraction of positive examples in the unlabeled data; and (ii) PU-learning---given such an estimate, learning the desired positive-versus-negative classifier. Unfortunately, classical methods for both problems break down in high-dimensional settings. Meanwhile, recently proposed heuristics lack theoretical coherence and depend precariously on hyperparameter tuning. In this paper, we propose two simple techniques: Best Bin Estimation (BBE) (for MPE); and Conditional Value Ignoring Risk (CVIR), a simple objective for PU-learning. Both methods dominate previous approaches empirically, and for BBE, we establish formal guarantees that hold whenever we can train a model to cleanly separate out a small subset of positive examples. Our final algorithm (TED)$^n$, alternates between the two procedures, significantly improving both our mixture proportion estimator and classifier
shaogao lv, Junhui Wang, Jiankun Liu, Yong Liu
In this paper, we provide theoretical results of estimation bounds and excess risk upper bounds for support vector machine (SVM) with sparse multi-kernel representation. These convergence rates for multi-kernel SVM are established by analyzing a Lasso-type regularized learning scheme within composite multi-kernel spaces. It is shown that the oracle rates of convergence of classifiers depend on the complexity of multi-kernels, the sparsity, a Bernstein condition and the sample size, which significantly improves on previous results even for the additive or linear cases. In summary, this paper not only provides unified theoretical results for multi-kernel SVMs, but also enriches the literature on high-dimensional nonparametric classification.
Shengjie Wang, Tianyi Zhou, Chandrashekhar Lavania, Jeff Bilmes
tl;dr: We propose algorithms for the constrained robust submodular partitioning problem with theoretical guarantees.
In the robust submodular partitioning problem, we aim to allocate a set of items into $m$ blocks, so that the evaluation of the minimum block according to a submodular function is maximized. Robust submodular partitioning promotes the diversity of every block in the partition. It has many applications in machine learning, e.g., partitioning data for distributed training so that the gradients computed on every block are consistent. We study an extension of the robust submodular partition problem with additional constraints (e.g., cardinality, multiple matroids, and/or knapsack) on every block. For example, when partitioning data for distributed training, we can add a constraint that the number of samples of each class is the same in each partition block, ensuring data balance. We present two classes of algorithms, i.e., Min-Block Greedy based algorithms (with an $\Omega(1/m)$ bound), and Round-Robin Greedy based algorithms (with a constant bound) and show that under various constraints, they still have good approximation guarantees. Interestingly, while normally the latter runs in only weakly polynomial time, we show that using the two together yields strongly polynomial running time while preserving the approximation guarantee. Lastly, we apply the algorithms on a real-world machine learning data partitioning problem showing good results.
Matthew K McLeod, Chunlok Lo, Matthew Kyle Schlegel, Andrew Jacobsen, Raksha Kumaraswamy, Martha White, Adam M White
tl;dr: Adapting behaviour for auxiliary task learning
Learning auxiliary tasks, such as multiple predictions about the world, can provide many benefits to reinforcement learning systems. A variety of off-policy learning algorithms have been developed to learn such predictions, but as yet there is little work on how to adapt the behavior to gather useful data for those off-policy predictions. In this work, we investigate a reinforcement learning system designed to learn a collection of auxiliary tasks, with a behavior policy learning to take actions to improve those auxiliary predictions. We highlight the inherent non-stationarity in this continual auxiliary task learning problem, for both prediction learners and the behavior learner. We develop an algorithm based on successor features that facilitates tracking under non-stationary rewards, and prove the separation into learning successor features and rewards provides convergence rate improvements. We conduct an in-depth study into the resulting multi-prediction learning system.
Chenlin Meng, Yang Song, Wenzhe Li, Stefano Ermon
tl;dr: We generalize denoising score matching to estimate higher order gradients of the log data density from samples.
The first order derivative of a data density can be estimated efficiently by denoising score matching, and has become an important component in many applications, such as image generation and audio synthesis. Higher order derivatives provide additional local information about the data distribution and enable new applications. Although they can be estimated via automatic differentiation of a learned density model, this can amplify estimation errors and is expensive in high dimensional settings. To overcome these limitations, we propose a method to directly estimate high order derivatives (scores) of a data density from samples. We first show that denoising score matching can be interpreted as a particular case of Tweedie’s formula. By leveraging Tweedie’s formula on higher order moments, we generalize denoising score matching to estimate higher order derivatives. We demonstrate empirically that models trained with the proposed method can approximate second order derivatives more efficiently and accurately than via automatic differentiation. We show that our models can be used to quantify uncertainty in denoising and to improve the mixing speed of Langevin dynamics via Ozaki discretization for sampling synthetic data and natural images.
Zakaria Mhammedi
Acquisition of data is a difficult task in many applications of machine learning, and it is only natural that one hopes and expects the population risk to decrease (better performance) monotonically with increasing data points. It turns out, somewhat surprisingly, that this is not the case even for the most standard algorithms that minimize the empirical risk. Non-monotonic behavior of the risk and instability in training have manifested and appeared in the popular deep learning paradigm under the description of double descent. These problems highlight the current lack of understanding of learning algorithms and generalization. It is, therefore, crucial to pursue this concern and provide a characterization of such behavior. In this paper, we derive the first consistent and risk-monotonic (in high probability) algorithms for a general statistical learning setting under weak assumptions, consequently answering some questions posed by Viering et. al. 2019 on how to avoid non-monotonic behavior of risk curves. We further show that risk monotonicity need not necessarily come at the price of worse excess risk rates. To achieve this, we derive new empirical Bernstein-like concentration inequalities of independent interest that hold for certain non-i.i.d.~processes such as Martingale Difference Sequences.
Siddharth Reddy, Anca Dragan, Sergey Levine
tl;dr: We explore a new approach to lossy image compression that adapts compression to user behavior, optimizing reconstructions to be useful for downstream tasks instead of preserving visual appearance.
Standard lossy image compression algorithms aim to preserve an image's appearance, while minimizing the number of bits needed to transmit it. However, the amount of information actually needed by the user for downstream tasks -- e.g., deciding which product to click on in a shopping website -- is likely much lower. To achieve this lower bitrate, we would ideally only transmit the visual features that drive user behavior, while discarding details irrelevant to the user's decisions. We approach this problem by training a compression model through human-in-the-loop learning as the user performs tasks with the compressed images. The key insight is to train the model to produce a compressed image that induces the user to take the same action that they would have taken had they seen the original image. To approximate the loss function for this model, we train a discriminator that tries to distinguish whether a user's action was taken in response to the compressed image or the original. We evaluate our method through experiments with human participants on four tasks: reading handwritten digits, verifying photos of faces, browsing an online shopping catalogue, and playing a car racing video game. The results show that our method learns to match the user's actions with and without compression at lower bitrates than baseline methods, and adapts the compression model to the user's behavior: it preserves the digit number and randomizes handwriting style in the digit reading task, preserves hats and eyeglasses while randomizing faces in the photo verification task, preserves the perceived price of an item while randomizing its color and background in the online shopping task, and preserves upcoming bends in the road in the car racing game.
Shaofei Wang, Marko Mihajlovic, Qianli Ma, Andreas Geiger, Siyu Tang
tl;dr: We created generalizable and controllable neural signed distance fields (SDFs) that represent clothed humans from few monocular depth observations.
In this paper, we aim to create generalizable and controllable neural signed distance fields (SDFs) that represent clothed humans from monocular depth observations. Recent advances in deep learning, especially neural implicit representations, have enabled human shape reconstruction and controllable avatar generation from different sensor inputs. However, to generate realistic cloth deformations from novel input poses, watertight meshes or dense full-body scans are usually needed as inputs. Furthermore, due to the difficulty of effectively modeling pose-dependent cloth deformations for diverse body shapes and cloth types, existing approaches resort to per-subject/cloth-type optimization from scratch, which is computationally expensive. In contrast, we propose an approach that can quickly generate realistic clothed human avatars, represented as controllable neural SDFs, given only monocular depth images. We achieve this by using meta-learning to learn an initialization of a hypernetwork that predicts the parameters of neural SDFs. The hypernetwork is conditioned on human poses and represents a clothed neural avatar that deforms non-rigidly according to the input poses. Meanwhile, it is meta-learned to effectively incorporate priors of diverse body shapes and cloth types and thus can be much faster to fine-tune, compared to models trained from scratch. We qualitatively and quantitatively show that our approach outperforms state-of-the-art approaches that require complete meshes as inputs while our approach requires only depth frames as inputs and runs orders of magnitudes faster. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our meta-learned hypernetwork is very robust, being the first to generate avatars with realistic dynamic cloth deformations given as few as 8 monocular depth frames.
Rowan Zellers, Ximing Lu, Jack Hessel, Youngjae Yu, Jae Sung Park, Jize Cao, Ali Farhadi, Yejin Choi
tl;dr: We learn multimodal, temporal representations about “how the world works” through videos.
As humans, we understand events in the visual world contextually, performing multimodal reasoning across time to make inferences about the past, present, and future. We introduce MERLOT, a model that learns multimodal script knowledge by watching millions of YouTube videos with transcribed speech -- in an entirely label-free, self-supervised manner. By pretraining with a mix of both frame-level (spatial) and video-level (temporal) objectives, our model not only learns to match images to temporally corresponding words, but also to contextualize what is happening globally over time. As a result, MERLOT exhibits strong out-of-the-box representations of temporal commonsense, and achieves state-of-the-art performance on 12 different video QA datasets when finetuned. It also transfers well to the world of static images, allowing models to reason about the dynamic context behind visual scenes. On Visual Commonsense Reasoning, MERLOT~answers questions correctly with 80.6\% accuracy, outperforming state-of-the-art models of similar size by over 3\%, even those that make heavy use of auxiliary supervised data (like object bounding boxes). Ablation analyses demonstrate the complementary importance of: 1) training on videos versus static images; 2) scaling the magnitude and diversity of the pretraining video corpus; and 3) using diverse objectives that encourage full-stack multimodal reasoning, from the recognition to cognition level.
DJ Strouse, Kevin R. McKee, Matthew Botvinick, Edward Hughes, Richard Everett
tl;dr: We train state-of-the-art agents for zero-shot coordination with humans without using human data in the training pipeline.
Collaborating with humans requires rapidly adapting to their individual strengths, weaknesses, and preferences. Unfortunately, most standard multi-agent reinforcement learning techniques, such as self-play (SP) or population play (PP), produce agents that overfit to their training partners and do not generalize well to humans. Alternatively, researchers can collect human data, train a human model using behavioral cloning, and then use that model to train "human-aware" agents ("behavioral cloning play", or BCP). While such an approach can improve the generalization of agents to new human co-players, it involves the onerous and expensive step of collecting large amounts of human data first. Here, we study the problem of how to train agents that collaborate well with human partners without using human data. We argue that the crux of the problem is to produce a diverse set of training partners. Drawing inspiration from successful multi-agent approaches in competitive domains, we find that a surprisingly simple approach is highly effective. We train our agent partner as the best response to a population of self-play agents and their past checkpoints taken throughout training, a method we call Fictitious Co-Play (FCP). Our experiments focus on a two-player collaborative cooking simulator that has recently been proposed as a challenge problem for coordination with humans. We find that FCP agents score significantly higher than SP, PP, and BCP when paired with novel agent and human partners. Furthermore, humans also report a strong subjective preference to partnering with FCP agents over all baselines.
Pranjal Awasthi, Natalie Frank, Anqi Mao, Mehryar Mohri, Yutao Zhong
Adversarial robustness is an increasingly critical property of classifiers in applications. The design of robust algorithms relies on surrogate losses since the optimization of the adversarial loss with most hypothesis sets is NP-hard. But, which surrogate losses should be used and when do they benefit from theoretical guarantees? We present an extensive study of this question, including a detailed analysis of the $\mathcal{H}$-calibration and $\mathcal{H}$-consistency of adversarial surrogate losses. We show that convex loss functions, or the supremum-based convex losses often used in applications, are not $\mathcal{H}$-calibrated for common hypothesis sets used in machine learning. We then give a characterization of $\mathcal{H}$-calibration and prove that some surrogate losses are indeed $\mathcal{H}$-calibrated for the adversarial zero-one loss, with common hypothesis sets. In particular, we fix some calibration results presented in prior work for a family of linear models and significantly generalize the results to the nonlinear hypothesis sets. Next, we show that $\mathcal{H}$-calibration is not sufficient to guarantee consistency and prove that, in the absence of any distributional assumption, no continuous surrogate loss is consistent in the adversarial setting. This, in particular, proves that a claim made in prior work is inaccurate. Next, we identify natural conditions under which some surrogate losses that we describe in detail are $\mathcal{H}$-consistent. We also report a series of empirical results which show that many $\mathcal{H}$-calibrated surrogate losses are indeed not $\mathcal{H}$-consistent, and validate our theoretical assumptions. Our adversarial $\mathcal{H}$-consistency results are novel, even for the case where $\mathcal{H}$ is the family of all measurable functions.
Adeline Fermanian, Pierre Marion, Jean-Philippe Vert, Gérard Biau
tl;dr: Via a neural ODE approach, we frame RNN as a kernel method and derive theoretical guarantees on generalization and stability.
Building on the interpretation of a recurrent neural network (RNN) as a continuous-time neural differential equation, we show, under appropriate conditions, that the solution of a RNN can be viewed as a linear function of a specific feature set of the input sequence, known as the signature. This connection allows us to frame a RNN as a kernel method in a suitable reproducing kernel Hilbert space. As a consequence, we obtain theoretical guarantees on generalization and stability for a large class of recurrent networks. Our results are illustrated on simulated datasets.
Jungsoo Lee, Eungyeup Kim, Juyoung Lee, Jihyeon Lee, Jaegul Choo
tl;dr: This paper proposes a novel feature-level data augmentation for debiasing via learning disentangled representation.
Image classification models tend to make decisions based on peripheral attributes of data items that have strong correlation with a target variable (i.e., dataset bias). These biased models suffer from the poor generalization capability when evaluated on unbiased datasets. Existing approaches for debiasing often identify and emphasize those samples with no such correlation (i.e., bias-conflicting) without defining the bias type in advance. However, such bias-conflicting samples are significantly scarce in biased datasets, limiting the debiasing capability of these approaches. This paper first presents an empirical analysis revealing that training with "diverse" bias-conflicting samples beyond a given training set is crucial for debiasing as well as the generalization capability. Based on this observation, we propose a novel feature-level data augmentation technique in order to synthesize diverse bias-conflicting samples. To this end, our method learns the disentangled representation of (1) the intrinsic attributes (i.e., those inherently defining a certain class) and (2) bias attributes (i.e., peripheral attributes causing the bias), from a large number of bias-aligned samples, the bias attributes of which have strong correlation with the target variable. Using the disentangled representation, we synthesize bias-conflicting samples that contain the diverse intrinsic attributes of bias-aligned samples by swapping their latent features. By utilizing these diversified bias-conflicting features during the training, our approach achieves superior classification accuracy and debiasing results against the existing baselines on both synthetic and real-world datasets.
Nicholas Rhinehart, Jenny Wang, Glen Berseth, John D Co-Reyes, Danijar Hafner, Chelsea Finn, Sergey Levine
tl;dr: Learning a deep variational bayes filter of images for intrinsically-motivated stabilization of dynamic partially-observed environments
Humans and animals explore their environment and acquire useful skills even in the absence of clear goals, exhibiting intrinsic motivation. The study of intrinsic motivation in artificial agents is concerned with the following question: what is a good general-purpose objective for an agent? We study this question in dynamic partially-observed environments, and argue that a compact and general learning objective is to minimize the entropy of the agent's state visitation estimated using a latent state-space model. This objective induces an agent to both gather information about its environment, corresponding to reducing uncertainty, and to gain control over its environment, corresponding to reducing the unpredictability of future world states. We instantiate this approach as a deep reinforcement learning agent equipped with a deep variational Bayes filter. We find that our agent learns to discover, represent, and exercise control of dynamic objects in a variety of partially-observed environments sensed with visual observations without extrinsic reward.
Joel Dapello, Jenelle Feather, Hang Le, Tiago Marques, David Daniel Cox, Josh Mcdermott, James J. DiCarlo, SueYeon Chung
tl;dr: Adversarially trained networks and biologically inspired stochastic networks in both visual and auditory domains demonstrate distinct mechanisms for robust perception as revealed by neural population geometry.
Adversarial examples are often cited by neuroscientists and machine learning researchers as an example of how computational models diverge from biological sensory systems. Recent work has proposed adding biologically-inspired components to visual neural networks as a way to improve their adversarial robustness. One surprisingly effective component for reducing adversarial vulnerability is response stochasticity, like that exhibited by biological neurons. Here, using recently developed geometrical techniques from computational neuroscience, we investigate how adversarial perturbations influence the internal representations of standard, adversarially trained, and biologically-inspired stochastic networks. We find distinct geometric signatures for each type of network, revealing different mechanisms for achieving robust representations. Next, we generalize these results to the auditory domain, showing that neural stochasticity also makes auditory models more robust to adversarial perturbations. Geometric analysis of the stochastic networks reveals overlap between representations of clean and adversarially perturbed stimuli, and quantitatively demonstrate that competing geometric effects of stochasticity mediate a tradeoff between adversarial and clean performance. Our results shed light on the strategies of robust perception utilized by adversarially trained and stochastic networks, and help explain how stochasticity may be beneficial to machine and biological computation.
Qi CHEN, Changjian Shui, Mario Marchand
We derive a novel information-theoretic analysis of the generalization property of meta-learning algorithms. Concretely, our analysis proposes a generic understanding in both the conventional learning-to-learn framework \citep{amit2018meta} and the modern model-agnostic meta-learning (MAML) algorithms \citep{finn2017model}. Moreover, we provide a data-dependent generalization bound for the stochastic variant of MAML, which is \emph{non-vacuous} for deep few-shot learning. As compared to previous bounds that depend on the square norms of gradients, empirical validations on both simulated data and a well-known few-shot benchmark show that our bound is orders of magnitude tighter in most conditions.
Changhao Shi, Sivan Schwartz, Shahar Levy, Shay Achvat, Maisan Abboud, Amir Ghanayim, Jackie Schiller, Gal Mishne
To understand the relationship between behavior and neural activity, experiments in neuroscience often include an animal performing a repeated behavior such as a motor task. Recent progress in computer vision and deep learning has shown great potential in the automated analysis of behavior by leveraging large and high-quality video datasets. In this paper, we design Disentangled Behavior Embedding (DBE) to learn robust behavioral embeddings from unlabeled, multi-view, high-resolution behavioral videos across different animals and multiple sessions. We further combine DBE with a stochastic temporal model to propose Variational Disentangled Behavior Embedding (VDBE), an end-to-end approach that learns meaningful discrete behavior representations and generates interpretable behavioral videos. Our models learn consistent behavior representations by explicitly disentangling the dynamic behavioral factors (pose) from time-invariant, non-behavioral nuisance factors (context) in a deep autoencoder, and exploit the temporal structures of pose dynamics. Compared to competing approaches, DBE and VDBE enjoy superior performance on downstream tasks such as fine-grained behavioral motif generation and behavior decoding.
Lirong Xia
tl;dr: This paper characterizes the worst average-case satisfaction of two well-studied and important voting axioms, namely Condorcet criterion and participation, in semi-random models
We initiate the work towards a comprehensive picture of the worst average-case satisfaction of voting axioms in semi-random models, to provide a finer and more realistic foundation for comparing voting rules. We adopt the semi-random model and formulation in [Xia 2020], where an adversary chooses arbitrarily correlated ``ground truth'' preferences for the agents, on top of which random noises are added. We focus on characterizing the semi-random satisfaction of two well-studied voting axioms: Condorcet criterion and participation. We prove that for any fixed number of alternatives, when the number of voters $n$ is sufficiently large, the semi-random satisfaction of the Condorcet criterion under a wide range of voting rules is $1$, $1-\exp(-\Theta(n))$, $\Theta(n^{-0.5})$, $ \exp(-\Theta(n))$, or being $\Theta(1)$ and $1-\Theta(1)$ at the same time; and the semi-random satisfaction of participation is $1-\Theta(n^{-0.5})$. Our results address open questions by Berg and Lepelley in 1994, and also confirm the following high-level message: the Condorcet criterion is a bigger concern than participation under realistic models.
Joshua Rozner, Christopher Potts, Kyle Mahowald
tl;dr: We present a dataset of cryptic crossword clues as an NLP benchmark involving semantically complex, compositional language. We motivate a curricular approach and study the meta-linguistic capabilities and systematicity of subword-tokenized models.
Cryptic crosswords, the dominant crossword variety in the UK, are a promising target for advancing NLP systems that seek to process semantically complex, highly compositional language. Cryptic clues read like fluent natural language but are adversarially composed of two parts: a definition and a wordplay cipher requiring character-level manipulations. Expert humans use creative intelligence to solve cryptics, flexibly combining linguistic, world, and domain knowledge. In this paper, we make two main contributions. First, we present a dataset of cryptic clues as a challenging new benchmark for NLP systems that seek to process compositional language in more creative, human-like ways. After showing that three non-neural approaches and T5, a state-of-the-art neural language model, do not achieve good performance, we make our second main contribution: a novel curriculum approach, in which the model is first fine-tuned on related tasks such as unscrambling words. We also introduce a challenging data split, examine the meta-linguistic capabilities of subword-tokenized models, and investigate model systematicity by perturbing the wordplay part of clues, showing that T5 exhibits behavior partially consistent with human solving strategies. Although our curricular approach considerably improves on the T5 baseline, our best-performing model still fails to generalize to the extent that humans can. Thus, cryptic crosswords remain an unsolved challenge for NLP systems and a potential source of future innovation.
Yangsibo Huang, Samyak Gupta, Zhao Song, Kai Li, Sanjeev Arora
Gradient inversion attack (or input recovery from gradient) is an emerging threat to the security and privacy preservation of Federated learning, whereby malicious eavesdroppers or participants in the protocol can recover (partially) the clients' private data. This paper evaluates existing attacks and defenses. We find that some attacks make strong assumptions about the setup. Relaxing such assumptions can substantially weaken these attacks. We then evaluate the benefits of three proposed defense mechanisms against gradient inversion attacks. We show the trade-offs of privacy leakage and data utility of these defense methods, and find that combining them in an appropriate manner makes the attack less effective, even under the original strong assumptions. We also estimate the computation cost of end-to-end recovery of a single image under each evaluated defense. Our findings suggest that the state-of-the-art attacks can currently be defended against with minor data utility loss, as summarized in a list of potential strategies.
Paul-Ambroise Duquenne, Hongyu Gong, Holger Schwenk
tl;dr: We train a fixed-size speech embedding which is compatible with LASER text embedding. More than 20000h of mined speech translations, significant improvement of SOTA S2T system on CoVoST2. Proof of concept of direct speech-to-speech mining.
We present an approach to encode a speech signal into a fixed-size representation which minimizes the cosine loss with the existing massively multilingual LASER text embedding space. Sentences are close in this embedding space, independently of their language and modality, either text or audio. Using a similarity metric in that multimodal embedding space, we perform mining of audio in German, French, Spanish and English from Librivox against billions of sentences from Common Crawl. This yielded more than twenty thousand hours of aligned speech translations. To evaluate the automatically mined speech/text corpora, we train neural speech translation systems for several languages pairs. Adding the mined data, achieves significant improvements in the BLEU score on the CoVoST2 and the MUST-C test sets with respect to a very competitive baseline. Our approach can also be used to directly perform speech-to-speech mining, without the need to first transcribe or translate the data. We obtain more than one thousand three hundred hours of aligned speech in French, German, Spanish and English. This speech corpus has the potential to boost research in speech-to-speech translation which suffers from scarcity of natural end-to-end training data. All the mined multimodal corpora will be made freely available.
Justin Lim, Christina X Ji, Michael Oberst, Saul Blecker, Leora Horwitz, David Sontag
tl;dr: We present an algorithm for identifying regions of decisions with high inter-decision-maker disagreement.
Individuals often make different decisions when faced with the same context, due to personal preferences and background. For instance, judges may vary in their leniency towards certain drug-related offenses, and doctors may vary in their preference for how to start treatment for certain types of patients. With these examples in mind, we present an algorithm for identifying types of contexts (e.g., types of cases or patients) with high inter-decision-maker disagreement. We formalize this as a causal inference problem, seeking a region where the assignment of decision-maker has a large causal effect on the decision. Our algorithm finds such a region by maximizing an empirical objective, and we give a generalization bound for its performance. In a semi-synthetic experiment, we show that our algorithm recovers the correct region of heterogeneity accurately compared to baselines. Finally, we apply our algorithm to real-world healthcare datasets, recovering variation that aligns with existing clinical knowledge.
Hanrui Zhang, Vincent Conitzer
tl;dr: We study the problem of automatically designing mechanisms for a dynamic environment and give a polynomial-time algorithm for doing so.
We study Bayesian automated mechanism design in unstructured dynamic environments, where a principal repeatedly interacts with an agent, and takes actions based on the strategic agent's report of the current state of the world. Both the principal and the agent can have arbitrary and potentially different valuations for the actions taken, possibly also depending on the actual state of the world. Moreover, at any time, the state of the world may evolve arbitrarily depending on the action taken by the principal. The goal is to compute an optimal mechanism which maximizes the principal's utility in the face of the self-interested strategic agent. We give an efficient algorithm for computing optimal mechanisms, with or without payments, under different individual-rationality constraints, when the time horizon is constant. Our algorithm is based on a sophisticated linear program formulation, which can be customized in various ways to accommodate richer constraints. For environments with large time horizons, we show that the principal's optimal utility is hard to approximate within a certain constant factor, complementing our algorithmic result. These results paint a relatively complete picture for automated dynamic mechanism design in unstructured environments. We further consider a special case of the problem where the agent is myopic, and give a refined efficient algorithm whose time complexity scales linearly in the time horizon. In the full version of the paper, we show that memoryless mechanisms, which are without loss of generality optimal in Markov decision processes without strategic behavior, do not provide a good solution for our problem, in terms of both optimality and computational tractability. Moreover, we present experimental results where our algorithms are applied to synthetic dynamic environments with different characteristics, which not only serve as a proof of concept for our algorithms, but also exhibit intriguing phenomena in dynamic mechanism design.
Shashank Rajput, Kartik Sreenivasan, Dimitris Papailiopoulos, amin karbasi
tl;dr: We prove that multilayered threshold networks can be efficient memorizers, and offer and exponential improvement to existing bounds.
It is well known that modern deep neural networks are powerful enough to memorize datasets even when the labels have been randomized. Recently, Vershynin(2020) settled a long standing question by Baum(1988), proving that deep threshold networks can memorize $n$ points in $d$ dimensions using $\widetilde{\mathcal{O}}(e^{1/\delta^2}+\sqrt{n})$ neurons and $\widetilde{\mathcal{O}}(e^{1/\delta^2}(d+\sqrt{n})+n)$ weights, where $\delta$ is the minimum distance between the points. In this work, we improve the dependence on $\delta$ from exponential to almost linear, proving that $\widetilde{\mathcal{O}}(\frac{1}{\delta}+\sqrt{n})$ neurons and $\widetilde{\mathcal{O}}(\frac{d}{\delta}+n)$ weights are sufficient. Our construction uses Gaussian random weights only in the first layer, while all the subsequent layers use binary or integer weights. We also prove new lower bounds by connecting memorization in neural networks to the purely geometric problem of separating $n$ points on a sphere using hyperplanes.
Alan Nawzad Amin, Eli N Weinstein, Debora Susan Marks
tl;dr: We develop a scalable nonparametric Bayesian model of genomic sequences with theoretical guarantees.
Generative probabilistic modeling of biological sequences has widespread existing and potential use across biology and biomedicine, particularly given advances in high-throughput sequencing, synthesis and editing. However, we still lack methods with nucleotide resolution that are tractable at the scale of whole genomes and that can achieve high predictive accuracy in theory and practice. In this article we propose a new generative sequence model, the Bayesian embedded autoregressive (BEAR) model, which uses a parametric autoregressive model to specify a conjugate prior over a nonparametric Bayesian Markov model. We explore, theoretically and empirically, applications of BEAR models to a variety of statistical problems including density estimation, robust parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, and two-sample tests. We prove rigorous asymptotic consistency results including nonparametric posterior concentration rates. We scale inference in BEAR models to datasets containing tens of billions of nucleotides. On genomic, transcriptomic, and metagenomic sequence data we show that BEAR models provide large increases in predictive performance as compared to parametric autoregressive models, among other results. BEAR models offer a flexible and scalable framework, with theoretical guarantees, for building and critiquing generative models at the whole genome scale.
Yufei Xu, Qiming ZHANG, Jing Zhang, Dacheng Tao
Transformers have shown great potential in various computer vision tasks owing to their strong capability in modeling long-range dependency using the self-attention mechanism. Nevertheless, vision transformers treat an image as 1D sequence of visual tokens, lacking an intrinsic inductive bias (IB) in modeling local visual structures and dealing with scale variance. Alternatively, they require large-scale training data and longer training schedules to learn the IB implicitly. In this paper, we propose a new Vision Transformer Advanced by Exploring intrinsic IB from convolutions, i.e., ViTAE. Technically, ViTAE has several spatial pyramid reduction modules to downsample and embed the input image into tokens with rich multi-scale context by using multiple convolutions with different dilation rates. In this way, it acquires an intrinsic scale invariance IB and is able to learn robust feature representation for objects at various scales. Moreover, in each transformer layer, ViTAE has a convolution block in parallel to the multi-head self-attention module, whose features are fused and fed into the feed-forward network. Consequently, it has the intrinsic locality IB and is able to learn local features and global dependencies collaboratively. Experiments on ImageNet as well as downstream tasks prove the superiority of ViTAE over the baseline transformer and concurrent works. Source code and pretrained models will be available at https://github.com/Annbless/ViTAE.
Shahab Bakhtiari, Patrick J Mineault, Tim Lillicrap, Christopher C Pack, Blake Aaron Richards
tl;dr: Self-supervised predictive learning applied to a neural network with parallel pathways can account for some of the functional specialization of the visual systems.
The visual system of mammals is comprised of parallel, hierarchical specialized pathways. Different pathways are specialized in so far as they use representations that are more suitable for supporting specific downstream behaviours. In particular, the clearest example is the specialization of the ventral ("what") and dorsal ("where") pathways of the visual cortex. These two pathways support behaviours related to visual recognition and movement, respectively. To-date, deep neural networks have mostly been used as models of the ventral, recognition pathway. However, it is unknown whether both pathways can be modelled with a single deep ANN. Here, we ask whether a single model with a single loss function can capture the properties of both the ventral and the dorsal pathways. We explore this question using data from mice, who like other mammals, have specialized pathways that appear to support recognition and movement behaviours. We show that when we train a deep neural network architecture with two parallel pathways using a self-supervised predictive loss function, we can outperform other models in fitting mouse visual cortex. Moreover, we can model both the dorsal and ventral pathways. These results demonstrate that a self-supervised predictive learning approach applied to parallel pathway architectures can account for some of the functional specialization seen in mammalian visual systems.
Minchao Wu, Michael Norrish, Christian Walder, Amir Dezfouli
tl;dr: Applying deep reinforcement learning to interactive theorem proving. The framwork supports the learning of both proof search strategies and tactic prediction, without using human examples.
We propose a novel approach to interactive theorem-proving (ITP) using deep reinforcement learning. The proposed framework is able to learn proof search strategies as well as tactic and arguments prediction in an end-to-end manner. We formulate the process of ITP as a Markov decision process (MDP) in which each state represents a set of potential derivation paths. This structure allows us to introduce a novel backtracking mechanism which enables the agent to efficiently discard (predicted) dead-end derivations and restart the derivation from promising alternatives. We implement the framework in the HOL theorem prover. Experimental results show that the framework using learned search strategies outperforms existing automated theorem provers (i.e., hammers) available in HOL when evaluated on unseen problems. We further elaborate the role of key components of the framework using ablation studies.
Nicolas Keriven, Alberto Bietti, Samuel Vaiter
tl;dr: We prove universality theorems for "continuous" Graph Neural Networks arising in the large random graphs limit.
We study the approximation power of Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) on latent position random graphs. In the large graph limit, GNNs are known to converge to certain ``continuous'' models known as c-GNNs, which directly enables a study of their approximation power on random graph models. In the absence of input node features however, just as GNNs are limited by the Weisfeiler-Lehman isomorphism test, c-GNNs will be severely limited on simple random graph models. For instance, they will fail to distinguish the communities of a well-separated Stochastic Block Model (SBM) with constant degree function. Thus, we consider recently proposed architectures that augment GNNs with unique node identifiers, referred to as Structural GNNs here (SGNNs). We study the convergence of SGNNs to their continuous counterpart (c-SGNNs) in the large random graph limit, under new conditions on the node identifiers. We then show that c-SGNNs are strictly more powerful than c-GNNs in the continuous limit, and prove their universality on several random graph models of interest, including most SBMs and a large class of random geometric graphs. Our results cover both permutation-invariant and permutation-equivariant architectures.
Tushar Nagarajan, Kristen Grauman
tl;dr: We learn from real-world egocentric video what objects together enable activities (e.g., a knife and cutting board brought together with a tomato are conducive to cutting), and use this to improve training virtual household embodied AI agents.
Complex physical tasks entail a sequence of object interactions, each with its own preconditions -- which can be difficult for robotic agents to learn efficiently solely through their own experience. We introduce an approach to discover activity-context priors from in-the-wild egocentric video captured with human worn cameras. For a given object, an activity-context prior represents the set of other compatible objects that are required for activities to succeed (e.g., a knife and cutting board brought together with a tomato are conducive to cutting). We encode our video-based prior as an auxiliary reward function that encourages an agent to bring compatible objects together before attempting an interaction. In this way, our model translates everyday human experience into embodied agent skills. We demonstrate our idea using egocentric EPIC-Kitchens video of people performing unscripted kitchen activities to benefit virtual household robotic agents performing various complex tasks in AI2-iTHOR, significantly accelerating agent learning.
Yu-Chia Chen, Marina Meila
The null space of the $k$-th order Laplacian $\mathbf{\mathcal L}_k$, known as the {\em $k$-th homology vector space}, encodes the non-trivial topology of a manifold or a network. Understanding the structure of the homology embedding can thus disclose geometric or topological information from the data. The study of the null space embedding of the graph Laplacian $\mathbf{\mathcal L}_0$ has spurred new research and applications, such as spectral clustering algorithms with theoretical guarantees and estimators of the Stochastic Block Model. In this work, we investigate the geometry of the $k$-th homology embedding and focus on cases reminiscent of spectral clustering. Namely, we analyze the {\em connected sum} of manifolds as a perturbation to the direct sum of their homology embeddings. We propose an algorithm to factorize the homology embedding into subspaces corresponding to a manifold's simplest topological components. The proposed framework is applied to the {\em shortest homologous loop detection} problem, a problem known to be NP-hard in general. Our spectral loop detection algorithm scales better than existing methods and is effective on diverse data such as point clouds and images.
Chi Jin, Qinghua Liu, Sobhan Miryoosefi
Finding the minimal structural assumptions that empower sample-efficient learning is one of the most important research directions in Reinforcement Learning (RL). This paper advances our understanding of this fundamental question by introducing a new complexity measure—Bellman Eluder (BE) dimension. We show that the family of RL problems of low BE dimension is remarkably rich, which subsumes a vast majority of existing tractable RL problems including but not limited to tabular MDPs, linear MDPs, reactive POMDPs, low Bellman rank problems as well as low Eluder dimension problems. This paper further designs a new optimization-based algorithm— GOLF, and reanalyzes a hypothesis elimination-based algorithm—OLIVE (proposed in Jiang et al. (2017)). We prove that both algorithms learn the near-optimal policies of low BE dimension problems in a number of samples that is polynomial in all relevant parameters, but independent of the size of state-action space. Our regret and sample complexity results match or improve the best existing results for several well-known subclasses of low BE dimension problems.
Gabriel Koch Ocker, Michael A Buice
tl;dr: We study a family of generalized nonlinear Hebbian learning rules, finding that their dynamics learn tensor eigendecompositions of higher-order input correlations.
Biological synaptic plasticity exhibits nonlinearities that are not accounted for by classic Hebbian learning rules. Here, we introduce a simple family of generalized nonlinear Hebbian learning rules. We study the computations implemented by their dynamics in the simple setting of a neuron receiving feedforward inputs. These nonlinear Hebbian rules allow a neuron to learn tensor decompositions of its higher- order input correlations. The particular input correlation decomposed and the form of the decomposition depend on the location of nonlinearities in the plasticity rule. For simple, biologically motivated parameters, the neuron learns eigenvectors of higher-order input correlation tensors. We prove that tensor eigenvectors are attractors and determine their basins of attraction. We calculate the volume of those basins, showing that the dominant eigenvector has the largest basin of attraction. We then study arbitrary learning rules and find that any learning rule that admits a finite Taylor expansion into the neural input and output also has stable equilibria at generalized eigenvectors of higher-order input correlation tensors. Nonlinearities in synaptic plasticity thus allow a neuron to encode higher-order input correlations in a simple fashion.
Aran Nayebi, Alexander Attinger, Malcolm G. Campbell, Kiah Hardcastle, Isabel I. C. Low, Caitlin S. Mallory, Gabriel Carreira Mel, Ben Sorscher, Alex H Williams, Surya Ganguli, Lisa Giocomo, Daniel LK Yamins
tl;dr: Our specific findings suggest that task-driven RNNs with certain architectural motifs effectively explain neural responses in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), and that heterogeneous cells may play an important role in MEC-mediated animal behaviors.
Medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) supports a wide range of navigational and memory related behaviors. Well-known experimental results have revealed specialized cell types in MEC --- e.g. grid, border, and head-direction cells --- whose highly stereotypical response profiles are suggestive of the role they might play in supporting MEC functionality. However, the majority of MEC neurons do not exhibit stereotypical firing patterns. How should the response profiles of these more "heterogeneous" cells be described, and how do they contribute to behavior? In this work, we took a computational approach to addressing these questions. We first performed a statistical analysis that shows that heterogeneous MEC cells are just as reliable in their response patterns as the more stereotypical cell types, suggesting that they have a coherent functional role. Next, we evaluated a spectrum of candidate models in terms of their ability to describe the response profiles of both stereotypical and heterogeneous MEC cells. We found that recently developed task-optimized neural network models are substantially better than traditional grid cell-centric models at matching most MEC neuronal response profiles --- including those of grid cells themselves --- despite not being explicitly trained for this purpose. Specific choices of network architecture (such as gated nonlinearities and an explicit intermediate place cell representation) have an important effect on the ability of the model to generalize to novel scenarios, with the best of these models closely approaching the noise ceiling of the data itself. We then performed in silico experiments on this model to address questions involving the relative functional relevance of various cell types, finding that heterogeneous cells are likely to be just as involved in downstream functional outcomes (such as path integration) as grid and border cells. Finally, inspired by recent data showing that, going beyond their spatial response selectivity, MEC cells are also responsive to non-spatial rewards, we introduce a new MEC model that performs reward-modulated path integration. We find that this unified model matches neural recordings across all variable-reward conditions. Taken together, our results point toward a conceptually principled goal-driven modeling approach for moving future experimental and computational efforts beyond overly-simplistic single-cell stereotypes.
Christopher Fifty, Ehsan Amid, Zhe Zhao, Tianhe Yu, Rohan Anil, Chelsea Finn
tl;dr: An efficient approach to determine which tasks should train together in multi-task learning networks.
Multi-task learning can leverage information learned by one task to benefit the training of other tasks. Despite this capacity, naively training all tasks together in one model often degrades performance, and exhaustively searching through combinations of task groupings can be prohibitively expensive. As a result, efficiently identifying the tasks that would benefit from training together remains a challenging design question without a clear solution. In this paper, we suggest an approach to select which tasks should train together in multi-task learning models. Our method determines task groupings in a single run by training all tasks together and quantifying the effect to which one task's gradient would affect another task's loss. On the large-scale Taskonomy computer vision dataset, we find this method can decrease test loss by 10.0% compared to simply training all tasks together while operating 11.6 times faster than a state-of-the-art task grouping method.
Julian Schrittwieser, Thomas K Hubert, Amol Mandhane, Mohammadamin Barekatain, Ioannis Antonoglou, David Silver
Learning efficiently from small amounts of data has long been the focus of model-based reinforcement learning, both for the online case when interacting with the environment, and the offline case when learning from a fixed dataset. However, to date no single unified algorithm could demonstrate state-of-the-art results for both settings. In this work, we describe the Reanalyse algorithm, which uses model-based policy and value improvement operators to compute improved training targets for existing data points, allowing for efficient learning at data budgets varying by several orders of magnitude. We further show that Reanalyse can also be used to learn completely without environment interactions, as in the case of Offline Reinforcement Learning (Offline RL). Combining Reanalyse with the MuZero algorithm, we introduce MuZero Unplugged, a single unified algorithm for any data budget, including Offline RL. In contrast to previous work, our algorithm requires no special adaptations for the off-policy or Offline RL settings. MuZero Unplugged sets new state-of-the-art results for Atari in the standard 200 million frame online setting as well as in the RL Unplugged Offline RL benchmark.
Liming Jiang, Bo Dai, Wayne Wu, Chen Change Loy
Generative adversarial networks (GANs) typically require ample data for training in order to synthesize high-fidelity images. Recent studies have shown that training GANs with limited data remains formidable due to discriminator overfitting, the underlying cause that impedes the generator's convergence. This paper introduces a novel strategy called Adaptive Pseudo Augmentation (APA) to encourage healthy competition between the generator and the discriminator. As an alternative method to existing approaches that rely on standard data augmentations or model regularization, APA alleviates overfitting by employing the generator itself to augment the real data distribution with generated images, which deceives the discriminator adaptively. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of APA in improving synthesis quality in the low-data regime. We provide a theoretical analysis to examine the convergence and rationality of our new training strategy. APA is simple and effective. It can be added seamlessly to powerful contemporary GANs, such as StyleGAN2, with negligible computational cost. Code: https://github.com/EndlessSora/DeceiveD.
Xiu-Shen Wei, Yang Shen, Xuhao Sun, Han-Jia Ye, Jian Yang
tl;dr: We propose a novel deep hashing model as expected to be efficient, effective and more importantly interpretable for the large-scale fine-grained retrieval task.
Our work focuses on tackling large-scale fine-grained image retrieval as ranking the images depicting the concept of interests (i.e., the same sub-category labels) highest based on the fine-grained details in the query. It is desirable to alleviate the challenges of both fine-grained nature of small inter-class variations with large intra-class variations and explosive growth of fine-grained data for such a practical task. In this paper, we propose an Attribute-Aware hashing Network (A$^2$-Net) for generating attribute-aware hash codes to not only make the retrieval process efficient, but also establish explicit correspondences between hash codes and visual attributes. Specifically, based on the captured visual representations by attention, we develop an encoder-decoder structure network of a reconstruction task to unsupervisedly distill high-level attribute-specific vectors from the appearance-specific visual representations without attribute annotations. A$^2$-Net is also equipped with a feature decorrelation constraint upon these attribute vectors to enhance their representation abilities. Finally, the required hash codes are generated by the attribute vectors driven by preserving original similarities. Qualitative experiments on five benchmark fine-grained datasets show our superiority over competing methods. More importantly, quantitative results demonstrate the obtained hash codes can strongly correspond to certain kinds of crucial properties of fine-grained objects.
Lukas Köhs, Bastian Alt, Heinz Koeppl
Switching dynamical systems provide a powerful, interpretable modeling framework for inference in time-series data in, e.g., the natural sciences or engineering applications. Since many areas, such as biology or discrete-event systems, are naturally described in continuous time, we present a model based on a Markov jump process modulating a subordinated diffusion process. We provide the exact evolution equations for the prior and posterior marginal densities, the direct solutions of which are however computationally intractable. Therefore, we develop a new continuous-time variational inference algorithm, combining a Gaussian process approximation on the diffusion level with posterior inference for Markov jump processes. By minimizing the path-wise Kullback-Leibler divergence we obtain (i) Bayesian latent state estimates for arbitrary points on the real axis and (ii) point estimates of unknown system parameters, utilizing variational expectation maximization. We extensively evaluate our algorithm under the model assumption and for real-world examples.
Romain Laroche, Remi Tachet des Combes
tl;dr: We improve policy gradient theory with off-policy updates and design an actor critic algorithm based on it.
The policy gradient theorem states that the policy should only be updated in states that are visited by the current policy, which leads to insufficient planning in the off-policy states, and thus to convergence to suboptimal policies. We tackle this planning issue by extending the policy gradient theory to policy updates with respect to any state density. Under these generalized policy updates, we show convergence to optimality under a necessary and sufficient condition on the updates’ state densities, and thereby solve the aforementioned planning issue. We also prove asymptotic convergence rates that significantly improve those in the policy gradient literature. To implement the principles prescribed by our theory, we propose an agent, Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde (J&H), with a double personality: Dr Jekyll purely exploits while Mr Hyde purely explores. J&H’s independent policies allow to record two separate replay buffers: one on-policy (Dr Jekyll’s) and one off-policy (Mr Hyde’s), and therefore to update J&H’s models with a mixture of on-policy and off-policy updates. More than an algorithm, J&H defines principles for actor-critic algorithms to satisfy the requirements we identify in our analysis. We extensively test on finite MDPs where J&H demonstrates a superior ability to recover from converging to a suboptimal policy without impairing its speed of convergence. We also implement a deep version of the algorithm and test it on a simple problem where it shows promising results.
Yang Song, Conor Durkan, Iain Murray, Stefano Ermon
tl;dr: Score-based generative models can achieve state-of-the-art likelihoods when re-weighting the training objective.
Score-based diffusion models synthesize samples by reversing a stochastic process that diffuses data to noise, and are trained by minimizing a weighted combination of score matching losses. The log-likelihood of score-based diffusion models can be tractably computed through a connection to continuous normalizing flows, but log-likelihood is not directly optimized by the weighted combination of score matching losses. We show that for a specific weighting scheme, the objective upper bounds the negative log-likelihood, thus enabling approximate maximum likelihood training of score-based diffusion models. We empirically observe that maximum likelihood training consistently improves the likelihood of score-based diffusion models across multiple datasets, stochastic processes, and model architectures. Our best models achieve negative log-likelihoods of 2.83 and 3.76 bits/dim on CIFAR-10 and ImageNet $32\times 32$ without any data augmentation, on a par with state-of-the-art autoregressive models on these tasks.
Antoine Bodin, Nicolas Macris
Recent evidence has shown the existence of a so-called double-descent and even triple-descent behavior for the generalization error of deep-learning models. This important phenomenon commonly appears in implemented neural network architectures, and also seems to emerge in epoch-wise curves during the training process. A recent line of research has highlighted that random matrix tools can be used to obtain precise analytical asymptotics of the generalization (and training) errors of the random feature model. In this contribution, we analyze the whole temporal behavior of the generalization and training errors under gradient flow for the random feature model. We show that in the asymptotic limit of large system size the full time-evolution path of both errors can be calculated analytically. This allows us to observe how the double and triple descents develop over time, if and when early stopping is an option, and also observe time-wise descent structures. Our techniques are based on Cauchy complex integral representations of the errors together with recent random matrix methods based on linear pencils.
Xiuwen Gong, Dong Yuan, Wei Bao
To deal with ambiguities in partial multilabel learning (PML), state-of-the-art methods perform disambiguation by identifying ground-truth labels directly. However, there is an essential question:“Can the ground-truth labels be identified precisely?". If yes, “How can the ground-truth labels be found?". This paper provides affirmative answers to these questions. Instead of adopting hand-made heuristic strategy, we propose a novel Mutual Information Label Identification for Partial Multilabel Learning (MILI-PML), which is derived from a clear probabilistic formulation and could be easily interpreted theoretically from the mutual information perspective, as well as naturally incorporates the feature/label relevancy considerations. Extensive experiments on synthetic and real-world datasets clearly demonstrate the superiorities of the proposed MILI-PML.
Robert Ganian, Viktoriia Korchemna
tl;dr: We circumvent previously established complexity lower bounds and identify conditions under which Bayesian Network Structure Learning becomes fixed-parameter tractable.
We investigate the parameterized complexity of Bayesian Network Structure Learning (BNSL), a classical problem that has received significant attention in empirical but also purely theoretical studies. We follow up on previous works that have analyzed the complexity of BNSL w.r.t. the so-called superstructure of the input. While known results imply that BNSL is unlikely to be fixed-parameter tractable even when parameterized by the size of a vertex cover in the superstructure, here we show that a different kind of parameterization - notably by the size of a feedback edge set - yields fixed-parameter tractability. We proceed by showing that this result can be strengthened to a localized version of the feedback edge set, and provide corresponding lower bounds that complement previous results to provide a complexity classification of BNSL w.r.t. virtually all well-studied graph parameters. We then analyze how the complexity of BNSL depends on the representation of the input. In particular, while the bulk of past theoretical work on the topic assumed the use of the so-called non-zero representation, here we prove that if an additive representation can be used instead then BNSL becomes fixed-parameter tractable even under significantly milder restrictions to the superstructure, notably when parameterized by the treewidth alone. Last but not least, we show how our results can be extended to the closely related problem of Polytree Learning.
Zhuo Huang, Chao Xue, Bo Han, Jian Yang, Chen Gong
tl;dr: A universal approach for open-set SSL.
Universal Semi-Supervised Learning (UniSSL) aims to solve the open-set problem where both the class distribution (i.e., class set) and feature distribution (i.e., feature domain) are different between labeled dataset and unlabeled dataset. Such a problem seriously hinders the realistic landing of classical SSL. Different from the existing SSL methods targeting at the open-set problem that only study one certain scenario of class distribution mismatch and ignore the feature distribution mismatch, we consider a more general case where a mismatch exists in both class and feature distribution. In this case, we propose a ''Class-shAring data detection and Feature Adaptation'' (CAFA) framework which requires no prior knowledge of the class relationship between the labeled dataset and unlabeled dataset. Particularly, CAFA utilizes a novel scoring strategy to detect the data in the shared class set. Then, it conducts domain adaptation to fully exploit the value of the detected class-sharing data for better semi-supervised consistency training. Exhaustive experiments on several benchmark datasets show the effectiveness of our method in tackling open-set problems.
Jackie Baek, Vivek Farias
tl;dr: We study how to fairly allocate the burden of exploration for multi-armed bandits with groups using the Nash bargaining framework.
Motivated by the consideration of fairly sharing the cost of exploration between multiple groups in learning problems, we develop the Nash bargaining solution in the context of multi-armed bandits. Specifically, the 'grouped' bandit associated with any multi-armed bandit problem associates, with each time step, a single group from some finite set of groups. The utility gained by a given group under some learning policy is naturally viewed as the reduction in that group's regret relative to the regret that group would have incurred 'on its own'. We derive policies that yield the Nash bargaining solution relative to the set of incremental utilities possible under any policy. We show that on the one hand, the 'price of fairness' under such policies is limited, while on the other hand, regret optimal policies are arbitrarily unfair under generic conditions. Our theoretical development is complemented by a case study on contextual bandits for warfarin dosing where we are concerned with the cost of exploration across multiple races and age groups.
Kai Wang, Sanket Shah, Haipeng Chen, Andrew Perrault, Finale Doshi-Velez, Milind Tambe
tl;dr: We extend decision-focused learning to MDPs with missing parameters. The key novelty is to approximate Hessian to address the high computational cost of differentiating through MDP layers, which arises from large state-action and policy spaces.
In the predict-then-optimize framework, the objective is to train a predictive model, mapping from environment features to parameters of an optimization problem, which maximizes decision quality when the optimization is subsequently solved. Recent work on decision-focused learning shows that embedding the optimization problem in the training pipeline can improve decision quality and help generalize better to unseen tasks compared to relying on an intermediate loss function for evaluating prediction quality. We study the predict-then-optimize framework in the context of sequential decision problems (formulated as MDPs) that are solved via reinforcement learning. In particular, we are given environment features and a set of trajectories from training MDPs, which we use to train a predictive model that generalizes to unseen test MDPs without trajectories. Two significant computational challenges arise in applying decision-focused learning to MDPs: (i) large state and action spaces make it infeasible for existing techniques to differentiate through MDP problems, and (ii) the high-dimensional policy space, as parameterized by a neural network, makes differentiating through a policy expensive. We resolve the first challenge by sampling provably unbiased derivatives to approximate and differentiate through optimality conditions, and the second challenge by using a low-rank approximation to the high-dimensional sample-based derivatives. We implement both Bellman-based and policy gradient-based decision-focused learning on three different MDP problems with missing parameters, and show that decision-focused learning performs better in generalization to unseen tasks.
Daniel Franzen, Michael Wand
tl;dr: We improve the ability of using (more) general nonlinerities in SO(2)-equivariant steerable networks.
Invariance under symmetry is an important problem in machine learning. Our paper looks specifically at equivariant neural networks where transformations of inputs yield homomorphic transformations of outputs. Here, steerable CNNs have emerged as the standard solution. An inherent problem of steerable representations is that general nonlinear layers break equivariance, thus restricting architectural choices. Our paper applies harmonic distortion analysis to illuminate the effect of nonlinearities on Fourier representations of SO(2). We develop a novel FFT-based algorithm for computing representations of non-linearly transformed activations while maintaining band-limitation. It yields exact equivariance for polynomial (approximations of) nonlinearities, as well as approximate solutions with tunable accuracy for general functions. We apply the approach to build a fully E(3)-equivariant network for sampled 3D surface data. In experiments with 2D and 3D data, we obtain results that compare favorably to the state-of-the-art in terms of accuracy while permitting continuous symmetry and exact equivariance.
James Kotary, Ferdinando Fioretto, Pascal Van Hentenryck
tl;dr: A study on the challenges of generating training data for supervised training of neural networks as constraint optimization solvers
Optimization problems are ubiquitous in our societies and are present in almost every segment of the economy. Most of these optimization problems are NP-hard and computationally demanding, often requiring approximate solutions for large-scale instances. Machine learning frameworks that learn to approximate solutions to such hard optimization problems are a potentially promising avenue to address these difficulties, particularly when many closely related problem instances must be solved repeatedly. Supervised learning frameworks can train a model using the outputs of pre-solved instances. However, when the outputs are themselves approximations, when the optimization problem has symmetric solutions, and/or when the solver uses randomization, solutions to closely related instances may exhibit large differences and the learning task can become inherently more difficult. This paper demonstrates this critical challenge, connects the volatility of the training data to the ability of a model to approximate it, and proposes a method for producing (exact or approximate) solutions to optimization problems that are more amenable to supervised learning tasks. The effectiveness of the method is tested on hard non-linear nonconvex and discrete combinatorial problems.
Weiyang Liu, Zhen Liu, Hanchen Wang, Liam Paull, Bernhard Schölkopf, Adrian Weller
tl;dr: An iterative teaching framework via label synthesis.
In this paper, we consider the problem of iterative machine teaching, where a teacher provides examples sequentially based on the current iterative learner. In contrast to previous methods that have to scan over the entire pool and select teaching examples from it in each iteration, we propose a label synthesis teaching framework where the teacher randomly selects input teaching examples (e.g., images) and then synthesizes suitable outputs (e.g., labels) for them. We show that this framework can avoid costly example selection while still provably achieving exponential teachability. We propose multiple novel teaching algorithms in this framework. Finally, we empirically demonstrate the value of our framework.
Stefano Teso, Andrea Bontempelli, Fausto Giunchiglia, Andrea Passerini
tl;dr: Approach that enables humans to improve data and models by interacting via example-based explanations selected using influence functions
We tackle sequential learning under label noise in applications where a human supervisor can be queried to relabel suspicious examples. Existing approaches are flawed, in that they only relabel incoming examples that look "suspicious" to the model. As a consequence, those mislabeled examples that elude (or don't undergo) this cleaning step end up tainting the training data and the model with no further chance of being cleaned. We propose CINCER, a novel approach that cleans both new and past data by identifying \emph{pairs of mutually incompatible examples}. Whenever it detects a suspicious example, CINCER identifies a counter-example in the training set that - according to the model - is maximally incompatible with the suspicious example, and asks the annotator to relabel either or both examples, resolving this possible inconsistency. The counter-examples are chosen to be maximally incompatible, so to serve as \emph{explanations} of the model's suspicion, and highly influential, so to convey as much information as possible if relabeled. CINCER achieves this by leveraging an efficient and robust approximation of influence functions based on the Fisher information matrix (FIM). Our extensive empirical evaluation shows that clarifying the reasons behind the model's suspicions by cleaning the counter-examples helps in acquiring substantially better data and models, especially when paired with our FIM approximation.
Michael John Hutchinson, Alexander Terenin, Viacheslav Borovitskiy, So Takao, Yee Whye Teh, Marc Peter Deisenroth
tl;dr: Vector-valued Gaussian Processes on Riemannian Manifolds via Gauge Independant Projected Kernels
Gaussian processes are machine learning models capable of learning unknown functions in a way that represents uncertainty, thereby facilitating construction of optimal decision-making systems. Motivated by a desire to deploy Gaussian processes in novel areas of science, a rapidly-growing line of research has focused on constructively extending these models to handle non-Euclidean domains, including Riemannian manifolds, such as spheres and tori. We propose techniques that generalize this class to model vector fields on Riemannian manifolds, which are important in a number of application areas in the physical sciences. To do so, we present a general recipe for constructing gauge independent kernels, which induce Gaussian vector fields, i.e. vector-valued Gaussian processes coherent with geometry, from scalar-valued Riemannian kernels. We extend standard Gaussian process training methods, such as variational inference, to this setting. This enables vector-valued Gaussian processes on Riemannian manifolds to be trained using standard methods and makes them accessible to machine learning practitioners.
Dweep Trivedi, Jesse Zhang, Shao-Hua Sun, Joseph J Lim
tl;dr: We propose a framework that learns to synthesize a program structured in a given Domain Specific Language that can be executed to solve a task described by an MDP.
Recently, deep reinforcement learning (DRL) methods have achieved impressive performance on tasks in a variety of domains. However, neural network policies produced with DRL methods are not human-interpretable and often have difficulty generalizing to novel scenarios. To address these issues, prior works explore learning programmatic policies that are more interpretable and structured for generalization. Yet, these works either employ limited policy representations (e.g. decision trees, state machines, or predefined program templates) or require stronger supervision (e.g. input/output state pairs or expert demonstrations). We present a framework that instead learns to synthesize a program, which details the procedure to solve a task in a flexible and expressive manner, solely from reward signals. To alleviate the difficulty of learning to compose programs to induce the desired agent behavior from scratch, we propose to first learn a program embedding space that continuously parameterizes diverse behaviors in an unsupervised manner and then search over the learned program embedding space to yield a program that maximizes the return for a given task. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed framework not only learns to reliably synthesize task-solving programs but also outperforms DRL and program synthesis baselines while producing interpretable and more generalizable policies. We also justify the necessity of the proposed two-stage learning scheme as well as analyze various methods for learning the program embedding. Website at https://clvrai.com/leaps.
Beidi Chen, Tri Dao, Eric Winsor, Zhao Song, Atri Rudra, Christopher Ré
tl;dr: Sparse + low-rank results in accurate and efficient approximation to attention matrices, improving end-to-end training and inference.
Recent advances in efficient Transformers have exploited either the sparsity or low-rank properties of attention matrices to reduce the computational and memory bottlenecks of modeling long sequences. However, it is still challenging to balance the trade-off between model quality and efficiency to perform a one-size-fits-all approximation for different tasks. To better understand this trade-off, we observe that sparse and low-rank approximations excel in different regimes, determined by the softmax temperature in attention, and sparse + low-rank can outperform each individually. Inspired by the classical robust-PCA algorithm for sparse and low-rank decomposition, we propose Scatterbrain, a novel way to unify sparse (via locality sensitive hashing) and low-rank (via kernel feature map) attention for accurate and efficient approximation. The estimation is unbiased with provably low error. We empirically show that Scatterbrain can achieve $2.1 \times$ lower error than baselines when serving as a drop-in replacement in BigGAN image generation and pre-trained T2T-ViT. On a pre-trained T2T Vision transformer, even without fine-tuning, Scatterbrain can reduce $98\%$ of attention memory at the cost of only $1\%$ drop in accuracy. We demonstrate Scatterbrain for end-to-end training with up to $4$ points better perplexity and 5 points better average accuracy than sparse or low-rank efficient transformers on language modeling and long-range-arena tasks.
Carlos Riquelme Ruiz, Joan Puigcerver, Basil Mustafa, Maxim Neumann, Rodolphe Jenatton, André Susano Pinto, Daniel Keysers, Neil Houlsby
tl;dr: We introduce a sparse mixture of experts architecture for vision classification and a new routing algorithm, leading to strong upstream and transfer results at the largest scale.
Sparsely-gated Mixture of Experts networks (MoEs) have demonstrated excellent scalability in Natural Language Processing. In Computer Vision, however, almost all performant networks are "dense", that is, every input is processed by every parameter. We present a Vision MoE (V-MoE), a sparse version of the Vision Transformer, that is scalable and competitive with the largest dense networks. When applied to image recognition, V-MoE matches the performance of state-of-the-art networks, while requiring as little as half of the compute at inference time. Further, we propose an extension to the routing algorithm that can prioritize subsets of each input across the entire batch, leading to adaptive per-image compute. This allows V-MoE to trade-off performance and compute smoothly at test-time. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of V-MoE to scale vision models, and train a 15B parameter model that attains 90.35% on ImageNet.
Arash Vahdat, Karsten Kreis, Jan Kautz
tl;dr: We present a framework for learning score-based generative models in a latent space
Score-based generative models (SGMs) have recently demonstrated impressive results in terms of both sample quality and distribution coverage. However, they are usually applied directly in data space and often require thousands of network evaluations for sampling. Here, we propose the Latent Score-based Generative Model (LSGM), a novel approach that trains SGMs in a latent space, relying on the variational autoencoder framework. Moving from data to latent space allows us to train more expressive generative models, apply SGMs to non-continuous data, and learn smoother SGMs in a smaller space, resulting in fewer network evaluations and faster sampling. To enable training LSGMs end-to-end in a scalable and stable manner, we (i) introduce a new score-matching objective suitable to the LSGM setting, (ii) propose a novel parameterization of the score function that allows SGM to focus on the mismatch of the target distribution with respect to a simple Normal one, and (iii) analytically derive multiple techniques for variance reduction of the training objective. LSGM obtains a state-of-the-art FID score of 2.10 on CIFAR-10, outperforming all existing generative results on this dataset. On CelebA-HQ-256, LSGM is on a par with previous SGMs in sample quality while outperforming them in sampling time by two orders of magnitude. In modeling binary images, LSGM achieves state-of-the-art likelihood on the binarized OMNIGLOT dataset.
Jonathan Schwarz, Siddhant Jayakumar, Razvan Pascanu, Peter E. Latham, Yee Whye Teh
The training of sparse neural networks is becoming an increasingly important tool for reducing the computational footprint of models at training and evaluation, as well enabling the effective scaling up of models. Whereas much work over the years has been dedicated to specialised pruning techniques, little attention has been paid to the inherent effect of gradient based training on model sparsity. In this work, we introduce Powerpropagation, a new weight-parameterisation for neural networks that leads to inherently sparse models. Exploiting the behaviour of gradient descent, our method gives rise to weight updates exhibiting a “rich get richer” dynamic, leaving low-magnitude parameters largely unaffected by learning. Models trained in this manner exhibit similar performance, but have a distribution with markedly higher density at zero, allowing more parameters to be pruned safely. Powerpropagation is general, intuitive, cheap and straight-forward to implement and can readily be combined with various other techniques. To highlight its versatility, we explore it in two very different settings: Firstly, following a recent line of work, we investigate its effect on sparse training for resource-constrained settings. Here, we combine Powerpropagation with a traditional weight-pruning technique as well as recent state-of-the-art sparse-to-sparse algorithms, showing superior performance on the ImageNet benchmark. Secondly, we advocate the use of sparsity in overcoming catastrophic forgetting, where compressed representations allow accommodating a large number of tasks at fixed model capacity. In all cases our reparameterisation considerably increases the efficacy of the off-the-shelf methods.
Jeongyeol Kwon, Yonathan Efroni, Constantine Caramanis, Shie Mannor
tl;dr: Fundamental Limits and Algorithms for Episodic Reinforcement Learning in MDPs with a Latent Context
In this work, we consider the regret minimization problem for reinforcement learning in latent Markov Decision Processes (LMDP). In an LMDP, an MDP is randomly drawn from a set of $M$ possible MDPs at the beginning of the interaction, but the identity of the chosen MDP is not revealed to the agent. We first show that a general instance of LMDPs requires at least $\Omega((SA)^M)$ episodes to even approximate the optimal policy. Then, we consider sufficient assumptions under which learning good policies requires polynomial number of episodes. We show that the key link is a notion of separation between the MDP system dynamics. With sufficient separation, we provide an efficient algorithm with local guarantee, {\it i.e.,} providing a sublinear regret guarantee when we are given a good initialization. Finally, if we are given standard statistical sufficiency assumptions common in the Predictive State Representation (PSR) literature (e.g., \cite{boots2011online}) and a reachability assumption, we show that the need for initialization can be removed.
Sebastien Bubeck, Yeshwanth Cherapanamjeri, Gauthier Gidel, Remi Tachet des Combes
tl;dr: We prove that a single gradient step finds adversarial examples on random two-layers neural networks.
Daniely and Schacham recently showed that gradient descent finds adversarial examples on random undercomplete two-layers ReLU neural networks. The term “undercomplete” refers to the fact that their proof only holds when the number of neurons is a vanishing fraction of the ambient dimension. We extend their result to the overcomplete case, where the number of neurons is larger than the dimension (yet also subexponential in the dimension). In fact we prove that a single step of gradient descent suffices. We also show this result for any subexponential width random neural network with smooth activation function.
Julien Boussard, Erdem Varol, Hyun Dong Lee, Nishchal Dethe, Liam Paninski
tl;dr: We propose a triangulation method to localize spikes in 3D in Neuropixels recordings, showing that this localization method leads to improved registration and clustering of the waveforms.
Neuropixels (NP) probes are dense linear multi-electrode arrays that have rapidly become essential tools for studying the electrophysiology of large neural populations. Unfortunately, a number of challenges remain in analyzing the large datasets output by these probes. Here we introduce several new methods for extracting useful spiking information from NP probes. First, we use a simple point neuron model, together with a neural-network denoiser, to efficiently map spikes detected on the probe into three-dimensional localizations. Previous methods localized spikes in two dimensions only; we show that the new localization approach is significantly more robust and provides an improved feature set for clustering spikes according to neural identity (``spike sorting"). Next, we apply a Poisson denoising method to the resulting three-dimensional point-cloud representation of the data, and show that the resulting 3D images can be accurately registered over time, leading to improved tracking of time-varying neural activity over the probe, and in turn, crisper estimates of neural clusters over time. The code to reproduce our results and an example neuropixels dataset is provided in the supplementary material.
Ayush Sekhari, Christoph Dann, Mehryar Mohri, Yishay Mansour, Karthik Sridharan
tl;dr: Provide algorithms for low rank MDPs with rich observations that do not require a realizable value function class, and instead focus on completing with a given policy class.
There have been many recent advances on provably efficient Reinforcement Learning (RL) in problems with rich observation spaces. However, all these works share a strong realizability assumption about the optimal value function of the true MDP. Such realizability assumptions are often too strong to hold in practice. In this work, we consider the more realistic setting of agnostic RL with rich observation spaces and a fixed class of policies $\Pi$ that may not contain any near-optimal policy. We provide an algorithm for this setting whose error is bounded in terms of the rank $d$ of the underlying MDP. Specifically, our algorithm enjoys a sample complexity bound of $\widetilde{O}\left((H^{4d} K^{3d} \log |\Pi|)/\epsilon^2\right)$ where $H$ is the length of episodes, $K$ is the number of actions and $\epsilon>0$ is the desired sub-optimality. We also provide a nearly matching lower bound for this agnostic setting that shows that the exponential dependence on rank is unavoidable, without further assumptions.
Jinyuan Fang, Qiang Zhang, Zaiqiao Meng, Shangsong Liang
tl;dr: We propose a novel structure-aware random Fourier kernel to improve GP's performance on graph-structured data.
Gaussian Processes (GPs) define distributions over functions and their generalization capabilities depend heavily on the choice of kernels. In this paper, we propose a novel structure-aware random Fourier (SRF) kernel for GPs that brings several benefits when modeling graph-structured data. First, SRF kernel is defined with a spectral distribution based on the Fourier duality given by the Bochner's theorem, transforming the kernel learning problem to a distribution inference problem. Second, SRF kernel admits a random Fourier feature formulation that makes the kernel scalable for optimization. Third, SRF kernel enables to leverage geometric structures by taking subgraphs as inputs. To effectively optimize GPs with SRF kernel, we develop a variational EM algorithm, which alternates between an inference procedure (E-step) and a learning procedure (M-step). Experimental results on five real-world datasets show that our model can achieve state-of-the-art performance in two typical graph learning tasks, i.e., object classification and link prediction.
Tommaso d'Orsi, Chih-Hung Liu, Rajai Nasser, Gleb Novikov, David Steurer, Stefan Tiegel
tl;dr: We present a new machinery to design efficiently computable, consistent estimators against general oblivious outliers, which is applicable to principal component analysis and sparse regression.
We develop machinery to design efficiently computable and \emph{consistent} estimators, achieving estimation error approaching zero as the number of observations grows, when facing an oblivious adversary that may corrupt responses in all but an $\alpha$ fraction of the samples. As concrete examples, we investigate two problems: sparse regression and principal component analysis (PCA). For sparse regression, we achieve consistency for optimal sample size $n\gtrsim (k\log d)/\alpha^2$ and optimal error rate $O(\sqrt{(k\log d)/(n\cdot \alpha^2)})$ where $n$ is the number of observations, $d$ is the number of dimensions and $k$ is the sparsity of the parameter vector, allowing the fraction of inliers to be inverse-polynomial in the number of samples. Prior to this work, no estimator was known to be consistent when the fraction of inliers $\alpha$ is $o(1/\log \log n)$, even for (non-spherical) Gaussian design matrices. Results holding under weak design assumptions and in the presence of such general noise have only been shown in dense setting (i.e., general linear regression) very recently by d'Orsi et al.~\cite{ICML-linear-regression}. In the context of PCA, we attain optimal error guarantees under broad spikiness assumptions on the parameter matrix (usually used in matrix completion). Previous works could obtain non-trivial guarantees only under the assumptions that the measurement noise corresponding to the inliers is polynomially small in $n$ (e.g., Gaussian with variance $1/n^2$). To devise our estimators, we equip the Huber loss with non-smooth regularizers such as the $\ell_1$ norm or the nuclear norm, and extend d'Orsi et al.'s approach~\cite{ICML-linear-regression} in a novel way to analyze the loss function. Our machinery appears to be easily applicable to a wide range of estimation problems. We complement these algorithmic results with statistical lower bounds showing that the fraction of inliers that our PCA estimator can deal with is optimal up to a constant factor.
Ari Pakman, Amin Nejatbakhsh, Dar Gilboa, Abdullah Makkeh, Luca Mazzucato, Michael Wibral, Elad Schneidman
tl;dr: A new method to estimate the unique information of continuous variables, with applications to recurrent neural networks.
The integration and transfer of information from multiple sources to multiple targets is a core motive of neural systems. The emerging field of partial information decomposition (PID) provides a novel information-theoretic lens into these mechanisms by identifying synergistic, redundant, and unique contributions to the mutual information between one and several variables. While many works have studied aspects of PID for Gaussian and discrete distributions, the case of general continuous distributions is still uncharted territory. In this work we present a method for estimating the unique information in continuous distributions, for the case of one versus two variables. Our method solves the associated optimization problem over the space of distributions with fixed bivariate marginals by combining copula decompositions and techniques developed to optimize variational autoencoders. We obtain excellent agreement with known analytic results for Gaussians, and illustrate the power of our new approach in several brain-inspired neural models. Our method is capable of recovering the effective connectivity of a chaotic network of rate neurons, and uncovers a complex trade-off between redundancy, synergy and unique information in recurrent networks trained to solve a generalized XOR~task.
Celestine Mendler-Dünner, Wenshuo Guo, Stephen Bates, Michael Jordan
tl;dr: We build on the DeGroot model of human consensus finding to develop a new decentralized protocol for combining predictions of multiple agents at test time.
An increasingly common setting in machine learning involves multiple parties, each with their own data, who want to jointly make predictions on future test points. Agents wish to benefit from the collective expertise of the full set of agents to make better predictions than they would individually, but may not be willing to release labeled data or model parameters. In this work, we explore a decentralized mechanism to make collective predictions at test time, that is inspired by the literature in social science on human consensus-making. Building on a query model to facilitate information exchange among agents, our approach leverages each agent’s pre-trained model without relying on external validation, model retraining, or data pooling. A theoretical analysis shows that our approach recovers inverse mean-squared-error (MSE) weighting in the large-sample limit which is known to be the optimal way to combine independent, unbiased estimators. Empirically, we demonstrate that our scheme effectively combines models with differing quality across the input space: the proposed consensus prediction achieves significant gains over classical model averaging, and even outperforms weighted averaging schemes that have access to additional validation data. Finally, we propose a decentralized Jackknife procedure as a tool to evaluate the sensitivity of the collective predictions with respect to a single agent's opinion.
Tahrima Rahman, Sara Rouhani, Vibhav Giridhar Gogate
tl;dr: A novel method that integrates fast knapsack algorithms, mini buckets and Lagrange relaxations and decompositions to yield upper bounds on the optimal value of a hard discrete constrained optimization problem.
We propose several schemes for upper bounding the optimal value of the constrained most probable explanation (CMPE) problem. Given a set of discrete random variables, two probabilistic graphical models defined over them and a real number $q$, this problem involves finding an assignment of values to all the variables such that the probability of the assignment is maximized according to the first model and is bounded by $q$ w.r.t. the second model. In prior work, it was shown that CMPE is a unifying problem with several applications and special cases including the nearest assignment problem, the decision preserving most probable explanation task and robust estimation. It was also shown that CMPE is NP-hard even on tractable models such as bounded treewidth networks and is hard for integer linear programming methods because it includes a dense global constraint. The main idea in our approach is to simplify the problem via Lagrange relaxation and decomposition to yield either a knapsack problem or the unconstrained most probable explanation (MPE) problem, and then solving the two problems, respectively using specialized knapsack algorithms and mini-buckets based upper bounding schemes. We evaluate our proposed scheme along several dimensions including quality of the bounds and computation time required on various benchmark graphical models and how it can be used to find heuristic, near-optimal feasible solutions in an example application pertaining to robust estimation and adversarial attacks on classifiers.
Min Jae Song, Ilias Zadik, Joan Bruna
tl;dr: We show a simple reduction which demonstrates the cryptographic hardness of learning one-layer neural networks over spherical Gaussian distributions in the presence of noise. Moreover, we show that noise is necessary for our hardness result.
We show a simple reduction which demonstrates the cryptographic hardness of learning a single periodic neuron over isotropic Gaussian distributions in the presence of noise. More precisely, our reduction shows that any polynomial-time algorithm (not necessarily gradient-based) for learning such functions under small noise implies a polynomial-time quantum algorithm for solving worst-case lattice problems, whose hardness form the foundation of lattice-based cryptography. Our core hard family of functions, which are well-approximated by one-layer neural networks, take the general form of a univariate periodic function applied to an affine projection of the data. These functions have appeared in previous seminal works which demonstrate their hardness against gradient-based (Shamir'18), and Statistical Query (SQ) algorithms (Song et al.'17). We show that if (polynomially) small noise is added to the labels, the intractability of learning these functions applies to all polynomial-time algorithms, beyond gradient-based and SQ algorithms, under the aforementioned cryptographic assumptions. Moreover, we demonstrate the necessity of noise in the hardness result by designing a polynomial-time algorithm for learning certain families of such functions under exponentially small adversarial noise. Our proposed algorithm is not a gradient-based or an SQ algorithm, but is rather based on the celebrated Lenstra-Lenstra-Lov\'asz (LLL) lattice basis reduction algorithm. Furthermore, in the absence of noise, this algorithm can be directly applied to solve CLWE detection (Bruna et al.'21) and phase retrieval with an optimal sample complexity of $d+1$ samples. In the former case, this improves upon the quadratic-in-$d$ sample complexity required in (Bruna et al.'21).
antonio vergari, YooJung Choi, Anji Liu, Stefano Teso, Guy Van den Broeck
tl;dr: We systematically characterize a tractable model class for an inference scenario by building a modular pipeline of atomic operations and thus distilling an efficient algorithm for it
Circuit representations are becoming the lingua franca to express and reason about tractable generative and discriminative models. In this paper, we show how complex inference scenarios for these models that commonly arise in machine learning---from computing the expectations of decision tree ensembles to information-theoretic divergences of sum-product networks---can be represented in terms of tractable modular operations over circuits. Specifically, we characterize the tractability of simple transformations---sums, products, quotients, powers, logarithms, and exponentials---in terms of sufficient structural constraints of the circuits they operate on, and present novel hardness results for the cases in which these properties are not satisfied. Building on these operations, we derive a unified framework for reasoning about tractable models that generalizes several results in the literature and opens up novel tractable inference scenarios.
Paul Liu, Aviad Rubinstein, Jan Vondrak, Junyao Zhao
tl;dr: We give $(1-1/e-\varepsilon)$ and $1/e-\varepsilon$ approximations for submodular maximization under a cardinality constraint in $O(k/\varepsilon)$ memory.
We consider the problem of maximizing submodular functions in single-pass streaming and secretaries-with-shortlists models, both with random arrival order. For cardinality constrained monotone functions, Agrawal, Shadravan, and Stein~\cite{SMC19} gave a single-pass $(1-1/e-\varepsilon)$-approximation algorithm using only linear memory, but their exponential dependence on $\varepsilon$ makes it impractical even for $\varepsilon=0.1$. We simplify both the algorithm and the analysis, obtaining an exponential improvement in the $\varepsilon$-dependence (in particular, $O(k/\varepsilon)$ memory). Extending these techniques, we also give a simple $(1/e-\varepsilon)$-approximation for non-monotone functions in $O(k/\varepsilon)$ memory. For the monotone case, we also give a corresponding unconditional hardness barrier of $1-1/e+\varepsilon$ for single-pass algorithms in randomly ordered streams, even assuming unlimited computation. Finally, we show that the algorithms are simple to implement and work well on real world datasets.
Hermanni Hälvä, Sylvain Le Corff, Luc Lehéricy, Jonathan So, Yongjie Zhu, Elisabeth Gassiat, Aapo Hyvarinen
tl;dr: New general identifiable framework for principled disentanglement using nonlinear ICA called Structured Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis (SNICA).
We introduce a new general identifiable framework for principled disentanglement referred to as Structured Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis (SNICA). Our contribution is to extend the identifiability theory of deep generative models for a very broad class of structured models. While previous works have shown identifiability for specific classes of time-series models, our theorems extend this to more general temporal structures as well as to models with more complex structures such as spatial dependencies. In particular, we establish the major result that identifiability for this framework holds even in the presence of noise of unknown distribution. Finally, as an example of our framework's flexibility, we introduce the first nonlinear ICA model for time-series that combines the following very useful properties: it accounts for both nonstationarity and autocorrelation in a fully unsupervised setting; performs dimensionality reduction; models hidden states; and enables principled estimation and inference by variational maximum-likelihood.
Michael Dinitz, Sungjin Im, Thomas Lavastida, Benjamin Moseley, Sergei Vassilvitskii
A recent line of research investigates how algorithms can be augmented with machine-learned predictions to overcome worst case lower bounds. This area has revealed interesting algorithmic insights into problems, with particular success in the design of competitive online algorithms. However, the question of improving algorithm running times with predictions has largely been unexplored. We take a first step in this direction by combining the idea of machine-learned predictions with the idea of ``warm-starting" primal-dual algorithms. We consider one of the most important primitives in combinatorial optimization: weighted bipartite matching and its generalization to $b$-matching. We identify three key challenges when using learned dual variables in a primal-dual algorithm. First, predicted duals may be infeasible, so we give an algorithm that efficiently maps predicted infeasible duals to nearby feasible solutions. Second, once the duals are feasible, they may not be optimal, so we show that they can be used to quickly find an optimal solution. Finally, such predictions are useful only if they can be learned, so we show that the problem of learning duals for matching has low sample complexity. We validate our theoretical findings through experiments on both real and synthetic data. As a result we give a rigorous, practical, and empirically effective method to compute bipartite matchings.
Dylan J Foster, Akshay Krishnamurthy
tl;dr: We resolve a COLT 2017 open problem (under an additional realizability assumption) with a simple and practical contextual bandit algorithm with an optimal first-order regret guarantee.
A recurring theme in statistical learning, online learning, and beyond is that faster convergence rates are possible for problems with low noise, often quantified by the performance of the best hypothesis; such results are known as first-order or small-loss guarantees. While first-order guarantees are relatively well understood in statistical and online learning, adapting to low noise in contextual bandits (and more broadly, decision making) presents major algorithmic challenges. In a COLT 2017 open problem, Agarwal, Krishnamurthy, Langford, Luo, and Schapire asked whether first-order guarantees are even possible for contextual bandits and---if so---whether they can be attained by efficient algorithms. We give a resolution to this question by providing an optimal and efficient reduction from contextual bandits to online regression with the logarithmic (or, cross-entropy) loss. Our algorithm is simple and practical, readily accommodates rich function classes, and requires no distributional assumptions beyond realizability. In a large-scale empirical evaluation, we find that our approach typically outperforms comparable non-first-order methods. On the technical side, we show that the logarithmic loss and an information-theoretic quantity called the triangular discrimination play a fundamental role in obtaining first-order guarantees, and we combine this observation with new refinements to the regression oracle reduction framework of Foster and Rakhlin (2020). The use of triangular discrimination yields novel results even for the classical statistical learning model, and we anticipate that it will find broader use.
Ilias Diakonikolas, Daniel Kane, Christos Tzamos
tl;dr: First efficient learning algorithm for Massart halfspaces with sample complexity independent of the bit complexity of the examples.
A Forster transform is an operation that turns a multivariate distribution into one with good anti-concentration properties. While a Forster transform does not always exist, we show that any distribution can be efficiently decomposed as a disjoint mixture of few distributions for which a Forster transform exists and can be computed efficiently. As the main application of this result, we obtain the first polynomial-time algorithm for distribution-independent PAC learning of halfspaces in the Massart noise model with strongly polynomial sample complexity, i.e., independent of the bit complexity of the examples. Previous algorithms for this learning problem incurred sample complexity scaling polynomially with the bit complexity, even though such a dependence is not information-theoretically necessary.
reda ouhamma, Odalric-Ambrym Maillard, Vianney Perchet
tl;dr: We propose a new analysis for the celebrated forward algorithm in the setting of stochastic online linear regression, and show the benefits of it replacing ridge regression whenever possible.
We consider the problem of online linear regression in the stochastic setting. We derive high probability regret bounds for online $\textit{ridge}$ regression and the $\textit{forward}$ algorithm. This enables us to compare online regression algorithms more accurately and eliminate assumptions of bounded observations and predictions. Our study advocates for the use of the forward algorithm in lieu of ridge due to its enhanced bounds and robustness to the regularization parameter. Moreover, we explain how to integrate it in algorithms involving linear function approximation to remove a boundedness assumption without deteriorating theoretical bounds. We showcase this modification in linear bandit settings where it yields improved regret bounds. Last, we provide numerical experiments to illustrate our results and endorse our intuitions.
Atsushi Nitanda, Denny Wu, Taiji Suzuki
tl;dr: Quantitative global convergence rate analysis of two-layer neural networks in the mean field regime for regularized expected/empirical risk minimization.
We propose the particle dual averaging (PDA) method, which generalizes the dual averaging method in convex optimization to the optimization over probability distributions with quantitative runtime guarantee. The algorithm consists of an inner loop and outer loop: the inner loop utilizes the Langevin algorithm to approximately solve for a stationary distribution, which is then optimized in the outer loop. The method can be interpreted as an extension of the Langevin algorithm to naturally handle nonlinear functional on the probability space. An important application of the proposed method is the optimization of neural network in the mean field regime, which is theoretically attractive due to the presence of nonlinear feature learning, but quantitative convergence rate can be challenging to obtain. By adapting finite-dimensional convex optimization theory into the space of measures, we not only establish global convergence of PDA for two-layer mean field neural networks under more general settings and simpler analysis, but also provide quantitative polynomial runtime guarantee. Our theoretical results are supported by numerical simulations on neural networks with reasonable size.
Junjiao Tian, Dylan Yung, Yen-Chang Hsu, Zsolt Kira
tl;dr: We propose a geometric perspective and a simple method for improving deterministic uncertainty estimation and calibration under distribution shift.
It is well known that vision classification models suffer from poor calibration in the face of data distribution shifts. In this paper, we take a geometric approach to this problem. We propose Geometric Sensitivity Decomposition (GSD) which decomposes the norm of a sample feature embedding and the angular similarity to a target classifier into an instance-dependent and an instance-independent com-ponent. The instance-dependent component captures the sensitive information about changes in the input while the instance-independent component represents the insensitive information serving solely to minimize the loss on the training dataset. Inspired by the decomposition, we analytically derive a simple extension to current softmax-linear models, which learns to disentangle the two components during training. On several common vision models, the disentangled model out-performs other calibration methods on standard calibration metrics in the face of out-of-distribution (OOD) data and corruption with significantly less complexity. Specifically, we surpass the current state of the art by 30.8% relative improvement on corrupted CIFAR100 in Expected Calibration Error.
Uri Sherman, Tomer Koren, Yishay Mansour
tl;dr: Average stability of SGD under without-replacement sampling leads to optimal regret upper bounds for random order online optimization.
We study online convex optimization in the random order model, recently proposed by Garber et al. (2020), where the loss functions may be chosen by an adversary, but are then presented to the online algorithm in a uniformly random order. Focusing on the scenario where the cumulative loss function is (strongly) convex, yet individual loss functions are smooth but might be non-convex, we give algorithms that achieve the optimal bounds and significantly outperform the results of Garber et al. (2020), completely removing the dimension dependence and improve their scaling with respect to the strong convexity parameter. Our analysis relies on novel connections between algorithmic stability and generalization for sampling without-replacement analogous to those studied in the with-replacement i.i.d. setting, as well as on a refined average stability analysis of stochastic gradient descent.
Chin-Wei Huang, Jae Hyun Lim, Aaron Courville
tl;dr: We derived an ELBO for continuous-time diffusion models using stochastic calculus, and made connection to continuous-time normalizing flows, hierarchical VAE, and score-based generative models.
Discrete-time diffusion-based generative models and score matching methods have shown promising results in modeling high-dimensional image data. Recently, Song et al. (2021) show that diffusion processes that transform data into noise can be reversed via learning the score function, i.e. the gradient of the log-density of the perturbed data. They propose to plug the learned score function into an inverse formula to define a generative diffusion process. Despite the empirical success, a theoretical underpinning of this procedure is still lacking. In this work, we approach the (continuous-time) generative diffusion directly and derive a variational framework for likelihood estimation, which includes continuous-time normalizing flows as a special case, and can be seen as an infinitely deep variational autoencoder. Under this framework, we show that minimizing the score-matching loss is equivalent to maximizing a lower bound of the likelihood of the plug-in reverse SDE proposed by Song et al. (2021), bridging the theoretical gap.
Andreas Maurer, massimiliano pontil
tl;dr: Concentration Inequalities Under Sub-Gaussian and Sub-Exponential Conditions
We prove analogues of the popular bounded difference inequality (also called McDiarmid's inequality) for functions of independent random variables under sub-gaussian and sub-exponential conditions. Applied to vector-valued concentration and the method of Rademacher complexities these inequalities allow an easy extension of uniform convergence results for PCA and linear regression to the case potentially unbounded input- and output variables.
Angeliki Lazaridou, Adhiguna Kuncoro, Elena Gribovskaya, Devang Agrawal, Adam Liska, Tayfun Terzi, Mai Gimenez, Cyprien de Masson d'Autume, Tomáš Kočiský, Sebastian Ruder, Dani Yogatama, Kris Cao, Susannah Young, Phil Blunsom
tl;dr: We test and analyze temporal generalization capabilities of neural language models using time-stratified datasets.
Our world is open-ended, non-stationary, and constantly evolving; thus what we talk about and how we talk about it change over time. This inherent dynamic nature of language contrasts with the current static language modelling paradigm, which trains and evaluates models on utterances from overlapping time periods. Despite impressive recent progress, we demonstrate that Transformer-XL language models perform worse in the realistic setup of predicting future utterances from beyond their training period, and that model performance becomes increasingly worse with time. We find that, while increasing model size alone—a key driver behind recent progress—does not solve this problem, having models that continually update their knowledge with new information can indeed mitigate this performance degradation over time. Hence, given the compilation of ever-larger language modelling datasets, combined with the growing list of language-model-based NLP applications that require up-to-date factual knowledge about the world, we argue that now is the right time to rethink the static way in which we currently train and evaluate our language models, and develop adaptive language models that can remain up-to-date with respect to our ever-changing and non-stationary world. We publicly release our dynamic, streaming language modelling benchmarks for WMT and arXiv to facilitate language model evaluation that takes temporal dynamics into account.
Brian Knott, Shobha Venkataraman, Awni Hannun, Shubhabrata Sengupta, Mark Ibrahim, Laurens van der Maaten
tl;dr: This paper presents CrypTen: a new framework for private and secure deep learning via secure multi-party computation.
Secure multi-party computation (MPC) allows parties to perform computations on data while keeping that data private. This capability has great potential for machine-learning applications: it facilitates training of machine-learning models on private data sets owned by different parties, evaluation of one party's private model using another party's private data, etc. Although a range of studies implement machine-learning models via secure MPC, such implementations are not yet mainstream. Adoption of secure MPC is hampered by the absence of flexible software frameworks that `"speak the language" of machine-learning researchers and engineers. To foster adoption of secure MPC in machine learning, we present CrypTen: a software framework that exposes popular secure MPC primitives via abstractions that are common in modern machine-learning frameworks, such as tensor computations, automatic differentiation, and modular neural networks. This paper describes the design of CrypTen and measure its performance on state-of-the-art models for text classification, speech recognition, and image classification. Our benchmarks show that CrypTen's GPU support and high-performance communication between (an arbitrary number of) parties allows it to perform efficient private evaluation of modern machine-learning models under a semi-honest threat model. For example, two parties using CrypTen can securely predict phonemes in speech recordings using Wav2Letter faster than real-time. We hope that CrypTen will spur adoption of secure MPC in the machine-learning community.
Zhiyuan Li, Sadhika Malladi, Sanjeev Arora
tl;dr: We study with theory and experiments (using a new method SVAG) the validity of the popular SDE Approximation to SGD as well as the Linear Scaling Rule.
It is generally recognized that finite learning rate (LR), in contrast to infinitesimal LR, is important for good generalization in real-life deep nets. Most attempted explanations propose approximating finite-LR SGD with Itô Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs), but formal justification for this approximation (e.g., Li et al., 2019) only applies to SGD with tiny LR. Experimental verification of the approximation appears computationally infeasible. The current paper clarifies the picture with the following contributions: (a) An efficient simulation algorithm SVAG that provably converges to the conventionally used Itô SDE approximation. (b) A theoretically motivated testable necessary condition for the SDE approximation and its most famous implication, the linear scaling rule (Goyal et al., 2017), to hold. (c) Experiments using this simulation to demonstrate that the previously proposed SDE approximation can meaningfully capture the training and generalization properties of common deep nets.
Gaurav Gupta, Xiongye Xiao, Paul Bogdan
tl;dr: We propose a novel multiwavelet-based Neural Operator scheme for learning partial differential equations, where the fundamental property of kernel smoothness enables efficient learning by multiwavelets.
The solution of a partial differential equation can be obtained by computing the inverse operator map between the input and the solution space. Towards this end, we introduce a $\textit{multiwavelet-based neural operator learning scheme}$ that compresses the associated operator's kernel using fine-grained wavelets. By explicitly embedding the inverse multiwavelet filters, we learn the projection of the kernel onto fixed multiwavelet polynomial bases. The projected kernel is trained at multiple scales derived from using repeated computation of multiwavelet transform. This allows learning the complex dependencies at various scales and results in a resolution-independent scheme. Compare to the prior works, we exploit the fundamental properties of the operator's kernel which enable numerically efficient representation. We perform experiments on the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, Burgers' equation, Darcy Flow, and Navier-Stokes equation. Compared with the existing neural operator approaches, our model shows significantly higher accuracy and achieves state-of-the-art in a range of datasets. For the time-varying equations, the proposed method exhibits a ($2X-10X$) improvement ($0.0018$ ($0.0033$) relative $L2$ error for Burgers' (KdV) equation). By learning the mappings between function spaces, the proposed method has the ability to find the solution of a high-resolution input after learning from lower-resolution data.
Marco Mondelli, Ramji Venkataramanan
tl;dr: We propose and rigorously analyze an algorithm consisting of PCA followed by Approximate Message Passing (AMP), for estimating a rank-1 signal in the presence of rotationally invariant noise.
We study the problem of estimating a rank-1 signal in the presence of rotationally invariant noise--a class of perturbations more general than Gaussian noise. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) provides a natural estimator, and sharp results on its performance have been obtained in the high-dimensional regime. Recently, an Approximate Message Passing (AMP) algorithm has been proposed as an alternative estimator with the potential to improve the accuracy of PCA. However, the existing analysis of AMP requires an initialization that is both correlated with the signal and independent of the noise, which is often unrealistic in practice. In this work, we combine the two methods, and propose to initialize AMP with PCA. Our main result is a rigorous asymptotic characterization of the performance of this estimator. Both the AMP algorithm and its analysis differ from those previously derived in the Gaussian setting: at every iteration, our AMP algorithm requires a specific term to account for PCA initialization, while in the Gaussian case, PCA initialization affects only the first iteration of AMP. The proof is based on a two-phase artificial AMP that first approximates the PCA estimator and then mimics the true AMP. Our numerical simulations show an excellent agreement between AMP results and theoretical predictions, and suggest an interesting open direction on achieving Bayes-optimal performance.
Hadi Salman, Andrew Ilyas, Logan Engstrom, Sai Vemprala, Aleksander Madry, Ashish Kapoor
tl;dr: We introduce unadversarial examples; objects explicitly designed to be robustly classified.
We study a class of computer vision settings wherein one can modify the design of the objects being recognized. We develop a framework that leverages this capability---and deep networks' unusual sensitivity to input perturbations---to design ``robust objects,'' i.e., objects that are explicitly optimized to be confidently classified. Our framework yields improved performance on standard benchmarks, a simulated robotics environment, and physical-world experiments.
Matthew Reimherr, Karthik Bharath, Carlos J Soto
tl;dr: We provide a mechanism for achieving differential privacy over Riemannian manifolds alongside sensitivity and utility guarantees for the Fréchet mean.
In this work we consider the problem of releasing a differentially private statistical summary that resides on a Riemannian manifold. We present an extension of the Laplace or K-norm mechanism that utilizes intrinsic distances and volumes on the manifold. We also consider in detail the specific case where the summary is the Fr\'echet mean of data residing on a manifold. We demonstrate that our mechanism is rate optimal and depends only on the dimension of the manifold, not on the dimension of any ambient space, while also showing how ignoring the manifold structure can decrease the utility of the sanitized summary. We illustrate our framework in two examples of particular interest in statistics: the space of symmetric positive definite matrices, which is used for covariance matrices, and the sphere, which can be used as a space for modeling discrete distributions.
Badih Ghazi, Ravi Kumar, Pasin Manurangsi
tl;dr: User-level private learning is possible with very few users provided each user has sufficiently many samples.
Most works in learning with differential privacy (DP) have focused on the setting where each user has a single sample. In this work, we consider the setting where each user holds $m$ samples and the privacy protection is enforced at the level of each user's data. We show that, in this setting, we may learn with a much fewer number of users. Specifically, we show that, as long as each user receives sufficiently many samples, we can learn any privately learnable class via an $(\epsilon, \delta)$-DP algorithm using only $O(\log(1/\delta)/\epsilon)$ users. For $\epsilon$-DP algorithms, we show that we can learn using only $O_{\epsilon}(d)$ users even in the local model, where $d$ is the probabilistic representation dimension. In both cases, we show a nearly-matching lower bound on the number of users required. A crucial component of our results is a generalization of global stability [Bun, Livni, Moran, FOCS 2020] that allows the use of public randomness. Under this relaxed notion, we employ a correlated sampling strategy to show that the global stability can be boosted to be arbitrarily close to one, at a polynomial expense in the number of samples.
Menachem Sadigurschi, Uri Stemmer
tl;dr: We present a novel algorithm attaining a dimensionality optimal dependency, while avoiding the logarithmic dependence on the domain-size.
We revisit the fundamental problem of learning Axis-Aligned-Rectangles over a finite grid $X^d\subseteq\mathbb{R}^d$ with differential privacy. Existing results show that the sample complexity of this problem is at most $\min\left\{ d{\cdot}\log|X| \;,\; d^{1.5}{\cdot}\left(\log^*|X| \right)^{1.5}\right\}$. That is, existing constructions either require sample complexity that grows linearly with $\log|X|$, or else it grows super linearly with the dimension $d$. We present a novel algorithm that reduces the sample complexity to only $\tilde{O}\left\{d{\cdot}\left(\log^*|X|\right)^{1.5}\right\}$, attaining a dimensionality optimal dependency without requiring the sample complexity to grow with $\log|X|$. The technique used in order to attain this improvement involves the deletion of "exposed" data-points on the go, in a fashion designed to avoid the cost of the adaptive composition theorems. The core of this technique may be of individual interest, introducing a new method for constructing statistically-efficient private algorithms.
Xiangyu Liu, Hangtian Jia, Ying Wen, Yujing Hu, Yingfeng Chen, Changjie Fan, Zhipeng Hu, Yaodong Yang
tl;dr: We investigate a new perspective on unifying diversity measures for open-ended learning in zero-sum games, which shapes an auto-curriculum to induce diverse yet effective behaviors.
Measuring and promoting policy diversity is critical for solving games with strong non-transitive dynamics where strategic cycles exist, and there is no consistent winner (e.g., Rock-Paper-Scissors). With that in mind, maintaining a pool of diverse policies via open-ended learning is an attractive solution, which can generate auto-curricula to avoid being exploited. However, in conventional open-ended learning algorithms, there are no widely accepted definitions for diversity, making it hard to construct and evaluate the diverse policies. In this work, we summarize previous concepts of diversity and work towards offering a unified measure of diversity in multi-agent open-ended learning to include all elements in Markov games, based on both Behavioral Diversity (BD) and Response Diversity (RD). At the trajectory distribution level, we re-define BD in the state-action space as the discrepancies of occupancy measures. For the reward dynamics, we propose RD to characterize diversity through the responses of policies when encountering different opponents. We also show that many current diversity measures fall in one of the categories of BD or RD but not both. With this unified diversity measure, we design the corresponding diversity-promoting objective and population effectivity when seeking the best responses in open-ended learning. We validate our methods in both relatively simple games like matrix game, non-transitive mixture model, and the complex \textit{Google Research Football} environment. The population found by our methods reveals the lowest exploitability, highest population effectivity in matrix game and non-transitive mixture model, as well as the largest goal difference when interacting with opponents of various levels in \textit{Google Research Football}.
Mingqing Xiao, Qingyan Meng, Zongpeng Zhang, Yisen Wang, Zhouchen Lin
tl;dr: We derive the equilibrium states for the average firing rates of feedback spiking neural networks and propose a novel supervised training method based on implicit differentiation, which achieves superior results with low latency.
Spiking neural networks (SNNs) are brain-inspired models that enable energy-efficient implementation on neuromorphic hardware. However, the supervised training of SNNs remains a hard problem due to the discontinuity of the spiking neuron model. Most existing methods imitate the backpropagation framework and feedforward architectures for artificial neural networks, and use surrogate derivatives or compute gradients with respect to the spiking time to deal with the problem. These approaches either accumulate approximation errors or only propagate information limitedly through existing spikes, and usually require information propagation along time steps with large memory costs and biological implausibility. In this work, we consider feedback spiking neural networks, which are more brain-like, and propose a novel training method that does not rely on the exact reverse of the forward computation. First, we show that the average firing rates of SNNs with feedback connections would gradually evolve to an equilibrium state along time, which follows a fixed-point equation. Then by viewing the forward computation of feedback SNNs as a black-box solver for this equation, and leveraging the implicit differentiation on the equation, we can compute the gradient for parameters without considering the exact forward procedure. In this way, the forward and backward procedures are decoupled and therefore the problem of non-differentiable spiking functions is avoided. We also briefly discuss the biological plausibility of implicit differentiation, which only requires computing another equilibrium. Extensive experiments on MNIST, Fashion-MNIST, N-MNIST, CIFAR-10, and CIFAR-100 demonstrate the superior performance of our method for feedback models with fewer neurons and parameters in a small number of time steps. Our code is available at https://github.com/pkuxmq/IDE-FSNN.
Ted Moskovitz, Jack Parker-Holder, Aldo Pacchiano, Michael Arbel, Michael Jordan
tl;dr: We present a framework for deep actor-critic algorithms that dynamically adjusts the degree of optimism or pessimism in value estimation using a bandit.
In recent years, deep off-policy actor-critic algorithms have become a dominant approach to reinforcement learning for continuous control. One of the primary drivers of this improved performance is the use of pessimistic value updates to address function approximation errors, which previously led to disappointing performance. However, a direct consequence of pessimism is reduced exploration, running counter to theoretical support for the efficacy of optimism in the face of uncertainty. So which approach is best? In this work, we show that the most effective degree of optimism can vary both across tasks and over the course of learning. Inspired by this insight, we introduce a novel deep actor-critic framework, Tactical Optimistic and Pessimistic (TOP) estimation, which switches between optimistic and pessimistic value learning online. This is achieved by formulating the selection as a multi-arm bandit problem. We show in a series of continuous control tasks that TOP outperforms existing methods which rely on a fixed degree of optimism, setting a new state of the art in challenging pixel-based environments. Since our changes are simple to implement, we believe these insights can easily be incorporated into a multitude of off-policy algorithms.
Hideaki Kim
Gaussian Cox processes are widely-used point process models that use a Gaussian process to describe the Bayesian a priori uncertainty present in latent intensity functions. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian inference scheme for Gaussian Cox processes by exploiting a conceptually-intuitive {¥it path integral} formulation. The proposed scheme does not rely on domain discretization, scales linearly with the number of observed events, has a lower complexity than the state-of-the-art variational Bayesian schemes with respect to the number of inducing points, and is applicable to a wide range of Gaussian Cox processes with various types of link functions. Our scheme is especially beneficial under the multi-dimensional input setting, where the number of inducing points tends to be large. We evaluate our scheme on synthetic and real-world data, and show that it achieves comparable predictive accuracy while being tens of times faster than reference methods.
Youngseog Chung, Willie Neiswanger, Ian Char, Jeff Schneider
tl;dr: Despite the benefits of using quantiles for predictive uncertainty quantification, the pinball loss (the standard method in learning quantiles) has many pitfalls, and we propose novel methods to learn calibrated quantiles.
Among the many ways of quantifying uncertainty in a regression setting, specifying the full quantile function is attractive, as quantiles are amenable to interpretation and evaluation. A model that predicts the true conditional quantiles for each input, at all quantile levels, presents a correct and efficient representation of the underlying uncertainty. To achieve this, many current quantile-based methods focus on optimizing the pinball loss. However, this loss restricts the scope of applicable regression models, limits the ability to target many desirable properties (e.g. calibration, sharpness, centered intervals), and may produce poor conditional quantiles. In this work, we develop new quantile methods that address these shortcomings. In particular, we propose methods that can apply to any class of regression model, select an explicit balance between calibration and sharpness, optimize for calibration of centered intervals, and produce more accurate conditional quantiles. We provide a thorough experimental evaluation of our methods, which includes a high dimensional uncertainty quantification task in nuclear fusion.
Zifeng Wang, Tong Jian, Aria Masoomi, Stratis Ioannidis, Jennifer Dy
tl;dr: We show that a penalty based on the Hilbert-Schmidt Independence Criterion enhances adversarial robustness both theoretically and experimentally.
We investigate the HSIC (Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion) bottleneck as a regularizer for learning an adversarially robust deep neural network classifier. In addition to the usual cross-entropy loss, we add regularization terms for every intermediate layer to ensure that the latent representations retain useful information for output prediction while reducing redundant information. We show that the HSIC bottleneck enhances robustness to adversarial attacks both theoretically and experimentally. In particular, we prove that the HSIC bottleneck regularizer reduces the sensitivity of the classifier to adversarial examples. Our experiments on multiple benchmark datasets and architectures demonstrate that incorporating an HSIC bottleneck regularizer attains competitive natural accuracy and improves adversarial robustness, both with and without adversarial examples during training. Our code and adversarially robust models are publicly available.
Chaehwan Song, Ali Ramezani-Kebrya, Thomas Pethick, Armin Eftekhari, Volkan Cevher
tl;dr: This paper achieves the current best subquadratic scaling on the number of parameters for fully-trained shallow neural networks under standard initialization schemes.
Overparameterization refers to the important phenomenon where the width of a neural network is chosen such that learning algorithms can provably attain zero loss in nonconvex training. The existing theory establishes such global convergence using various initialization strategies, training modifications, and width scalings. In particular, the state-of-the-art results require the width to scale quadratically with the number of training data under standard initialization strategies used in practice for best generalization performance. In contrast, the most recent results obtain linear scaling either with requiring initializations that lead to the "lazy-training", or training only a single layer. In this work, we provide an analytical framework that allows us to adopt standard initialization strategies, possibly avoid lazy training, and train all layers simultaneously in basic shallow neural networks while attaining a desirable subquadratic scaling on the network width. We achieve the desiderata via Polyak-Lojasiewicz condition, smoothness, and standard assumptions on data, and use tools from random matrix theory.
Han Zhong, Jiayi Huang, Lin Yang, Liwei Wang
Despite a large amount of effort in dealing with heavy-tailed error in machine learning, little is known when moments of the error can become non-existential: the random noise $\eta$ satisfies Pr$\left[|\eta| > |y|\right] \le 1/|y|^{\alpha}$ for some $\alpha > 0$. We make the first attempt to actively handle such super heavy-tailed noise in bandit learning problems: We propose a novel robust statistical estimator, mean of medians, which estimates a random variable by computing the empirical mean of a sequence of empirical medians. We then present a generic reductionist algorithmic framework for solving bandit learning problems (including multi-armed and linear bandit problem): the mean of medians estimator can be applied to nearly any bandit learning algorithm as a black-box filtering for its reward signals and obtain similar regret bound as if the reward is sub-Gaussian. We show that the regret bound is near-optimal even with very heavy-tailed noise. We also empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, which further corroborates our theoretical results.
Davin Choo, Tommaso d'Orsi
tl;dr: We provide a parametric algorithm and computational/information-theoretic bounds for the sparse tensor PCA model that generalizes both sparse PCA and tensor PCA
We study the problem of sparse tensor principal component analysis: given a tensor $\pmb Y = \pmb W + \lambda x^{\otimes p}$ with $\pmb W \in \otimes^p \mathbb{R}^n$ having i.i.d. Gaussian entries, the goal is to recover the $k$-sparse unit vector $x \in \mathbb{R}^n$. The model captures both sparse PCA (in its Wigner form) and tensor PCA. For the highly sparse regime of $k \leq \sqrt{n}$, we present a family of algorithms that smoothly interpolates between a simple polynomial-time algorithm and the exponential-time exhaustive search algorithm. For any $1 \leq t \leq k$, our algorithms recovers the sparse vector for signal-to-noise ratio $\lambda \geq \tilde{\mathcal{O}} (\sqrt{t} \cdot (k/t)^{p/2})$ in time $\tilde{\mathcal{O}}(n^{p+t})$, capturing the state-of-the-art guarantees for the matrix settings (in both the polynomial-time and sub-exponential time regimes). Our results naturally extend to the case of $r$ distinct $k$-sparse signals with disjoint supports, with guarantees that are independent of the number of spikes. Even in the restricted case of sparse PCA, known algorithms only recover the sparse vectors for $\lambda \geq \tilde{\mathcal{O}}(k \cdot r)$ while our algorithms require $\lambda \geq \tilde{\mathcal{O}}(k)$. Finally, by analyzing the low-degree likelihood ratio, we complement these algorithmic results with rigorous evidence illustrating the trade-offs between signal-to-noise ratio and running time. This lower bound captures the known lower bounds for both sparse PCA and tensor PCA. In this general model, we observe a more intricate three-way trade-off between the number of samples $n$, the sparsity $k$, and the tensor power $p$.
Weizhe Yuan, Graham Neubig, Pengfei Liu
tl;dr: Using text generation probability to evaluate the quality of generated text.
A wide variety of NLP applications, such as machine translation, summarization, and dialog, involve text generation. One major challenge for these applications is how to evaluate whether such generated texts are actually fluent, accurate, or effective. In this work, we conceptualize the evaluation of generated text as a text generation problem, modeled using pre-trained sequence-to-sequence models. The general idea is that models trained to convert the generated text to/from a reference output or the source text will achieve higher scores when the generated text is better. We operationalize this idea using BART, an encoder-decoder based pre-trained model, and propose a metric BARTScore with a number of variants that can be flexibly applied in an unsupervised fashion to evaluation of text from different perspectives (e.g. informativeness, fluency, or factuality). BARTScore is conceptually simple and empirically effective. It can outperform existing top-scoring metrics in 16 of 22 test settings, covering evaluation of 16 datasets (e.g., machine translation, text summarization) and 7 different perspectives (e.g., informativeness, factuality). Code to calculate BARTScore is available at https://github.com/neulab/BARTScore, and we have released an interactive leaderboard for meta-evaluation at http://explainaboard.nlpedia.ai/leaderboard/task-meval/ on the ExplainaBoard platform, which allows us to interactively understand the strengths, weaknesses, and complementarity of each metric.
Tim Dockhorn, Yaoliang Yu, Eyyub Sari, Mahdi Zolnouri, Vahid Partovi Nia
tl;dr: We generalize BinaryConnect and prove convergence for the resulting algorithm.
BinaryConnect (BC) and its many variations have become the de facto standard for neural network quantization. However, our understanding of the inner workings of BC is still quite limited. We attempt to close this gap in four different aspects: (a) we show that existing quantization algorithms, including post-training quantization, are surprisingly similar to each other; (b) we argue for proximal maps as a natural family of quantizers that is both easy to design and analyze; (c) we refine the observation that BC is a special case of dual averaging, which itself is a special case of the generalized conditional gradient algorithm; (d) consequently, we propose ProxConnect (PC) as a generalization of BC and we prove its convergence properties by exploiting the established connections. We conduct experiments on CIFAR-10 and ImageNet, and verify that PC achieves competitive performance.
Pranay Manocha, Buye Xu, Anurag Kumar
tl;dr: novel framework for speech quality assessment using random non-matched reference recordings
The perceptual task of speech quality assessment (SQA) is a challenging task for machines to do. Objective SQA methods that rely on the availability of the corresponding clean reference have been the primary go-to approaches for SQA. Clearly, these methods fail in real-world scenarios where the ground truth clean references are not available. In recent years, non-intrusive methods that train neural networks to predict ratings or scores have attracted much attention, but they suffer from several shortcomings such as lack of robustness, reliance on labeled data for training and so on. In this work, we propose a new direction for speech quality assessment. Inspired by human's innate ability to compare and assess the quality of speech signals even when they have non-matching contents, we propose a novel framework that predicts a subjective relative quality score for the given speech signal with respect to any provided reference without using any subjective data. We show that neural networks trained using our framework produce scores that correlate well with subjective mean opinion scores (MOS) and are also competitive to methods such as DNSMOS, which explicitly relies on MOS from humans for training networks. Moreover, our method also provides a natural way to embed quality-related information in neural networks, which we show is helpful for downstream tasks such as speech enhancement.
Masahiro Nakano, Yasuhiro Fujiwara, Akisato Kimura, Takeshi Yamada, Naonori Ueda
tl;dr: Multi-dimensional extension of the Chinese restaurant process, whose table coordinates arranged by the permuton.
This paper proposes the permuton-induced Chinese restaurant process (PCRP), a stochastic process on rectangular partitioning of a matrix. This distribution is suitable for use as a prior distribution in Bayesian nonparametric relational model to find hidden clusters in matrices and network data. Our main contribution is to introduce the notion of permutons into the well-known Chinese restaurant process (CRP) for sequence partitioning: a permuton is a probability measure on $[0,1]\times [0,1]$ and can be regarded as a geometric interpretation of the scaling limit of permutations. Specifically, we extend the model that the table order of CRPs has a random geometric arrangement on $[0,1]\times [0,1]$ drawn from the permuton. By analogy with the relationship between the stick-breaking process (SBP) and CRP for the infinite mixture model of a sequence, this model can be regarded as a multi-dimensional extension of CRP paired with the block-breaking process (BBP), which has been recently proposed as a multi-dimensional extension of SBP. While BBP always has an infinite number of redundant intermediate variables, PCRP can be composed of varying size intermediate variables in a data-driven manner depending on the size and quality of the observation data. Experiments show that PCRP can improve the prediction performance in relational data analysis by reducing the local optima and slow mixing problems compared with the conventional BNP models because the local transitions of PCRP in Markov chain Monte Carlo inference are more flexible than the previous models.
Alexander Soen, Ke Sun
tl;dr: We explore the variance of the Fisher information matrix in the context of deep learning.
In the realm of deep learning, the Fisher information matrix (FIM) gives novel insights and useful tools to characterize the loss landscape, perform second-order optimization, and build geometric learning theories. The exact FIM is either unavailable in closed form or too expensive to compute. In practice, it is almost always estimated based on empirical samples. We investigate two such estimators based on two equivalent representations of the FIM --- both unbiased and consistent. Their estimation quality is naturally gauged by their variance given in closed form. We analyze how the parametric structure of a deep neural network can affect the variance. The meaning of this variance measure and its upper bounds are then discussed in the context of deep learning.
Sudeep Salgia, Sattar Vakili, Qing Zhao
We consider sequential optimization of an unknown function in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. We propose a Gaussian process-based algorithm and establish its order-optimal regret performance (up to a poly-logarithmic factor). This is the first GP-based algorithm with an order-optimal regret guarantee. The proposed algorithm is rooted in the methodology of domain shrinking realized through a sequence of tree-based region pruning and refining to concentrate queries in increasingly smaller high-performing regions of the function domain. The search for high-performing regions is localized and guided by an iterative estimation of the optimal function value to ensure both learning efficiency and computational efficiency. Compared with the prevailing GP-UCB family of algorithms, the proposed algorithm reduces computational complexity by a factor of $O(T^{2d-1})$ (where $T$ is the time horizon and $d$ the dimension of the function domain).
Xiyang Liu, Weihao Kong, Sham M. Kakade, Sewoong Oh
tl;dr: We provide the first family of algorithms for mean estimation achieving both robustness and differential privacy.
In statistical learning and analysis from shared data, which is increasingly widely adopted in platforms such as federated learning and meta-learning, there are two major concerns: privacy and robustness. Each participating individual should be able to contribute without the fear of leaking one's sensitive information. At the same time, the system should be robust in the presence of malicious participants inserting corrupted data. Recent algorithmic advances in learning from shared data focus on either one of these threats, leaving the system vulnerable to the other. We bridge this gap for the canonical problem of estimating the mean from i.i.d.~samples. We introduce PRIME, which is the first efficient algorithm that achieves both privacy and robustness for a wide range of distributions. We further complement this result with a novel exponential time algorithm that improves the sample complexity of PRIME, achieving a near-optimal guarantee and matching that of a known lower bound for (non-robust) private mean estimation. This proves that there is no extra statistical cost to simultaneously guaranteeing privacy and robustness.
Tianlong Chen, Yu Cheng, Zhe Gan, Jingjing Liu, Zhangyang Wang
tl;dr: Treating the lottery ticket as an inductive prior, we provide a brand-new angle for the data-hungry GAN training, that is orthogonal to augmentation-based methods.
Training generative adversarial networks (GANs) with limited real image data generally results in deteriorated performance and collapsed models. To conquer this challenge, we are inspired by the latest observation, that one can discover independently trainable and highly sparse subnetworks (a.k.a., lottery tickets) from GANs. Treating this as an inductive prior, we suggest a brand-new angle towards data-efficient GAN training: by first identifying the lottery ticket from the original GAN using the small training set of real images; and then focusing on training that sparse subnetwork by re-using the same set. We find our coordinated framework to offer orthogonal gains to existing real image data augmentation methods, and we additionally present a new feature-level augmentation that can be applied together with them. Comprehensive experiments endorse the effectiveness of our proposed framework, across various GAN architectures (SNGAN, BigGAN, and StyleGAN-V2) and diverse datasets (CIFAR-10, CIFAR-100, Tiny-ImageNet, ImageNet, and multiple few-shot generation datasets). Codes are available at: https://github.com/VITA-Group/Ultra-Data-Efficient-GAN-Training.
Jiachen Lu, Jinghan Yao, Junge Zhang, Xiatian Zhu, Hang Xu, Weiguo Gao, Chunjing Xu, Tao Xiang, Li Zhang
Vision transformers (ViTs) have pushed the state-of-the-art for various visual recognition tasks by patch-wise image tokenization followed by self-attention. However, the employment of self-attention modules results in a quadratic complexity in both computation and memory usage. Various attempts on approximating the self-attention computation with linear complexity have been made in Natural Language Processing. However, an in-depth analysis in this work shows that they are either theoretically flawed or empirically ineffective for visual recognition. We further identify that their limitations are rooted in keeping the softmax self-attention during approximations. Specifically, conventional self-attention is computed by normalizing the scaled dot-product between token feature vectors. Keeping this softmax operation challenges any subsequent linearization efforts. Based on this insight, for the first time, a softmax-free transformer or SOFT is proposed. To remove softmax in self-attention, Gaussian kernel function is used to replace the dot-product similarity without further normalization. This enables a full self-attention matrix to be approximated via a low-rank matrix decomposition. The robustness of the approximation is achieved by calculating its Moore-Penrose inverse using a Newton-Raphson method. Extensive experiments on ImageNet show that our SOFT significantly improves the computational efficiency of existing ViT variants. Crucially, with a linear complexity, much longer token sequences are permitted in SOFT, resulting in superior trade-off between accuracy and complexity.
Gabriele Farina, Tuomas Sandholm
In two-player zero-sum extensive-form games, Nash equilibrium prescribes optimal strategies against perfectly rational opponents. However, it does not guarantee rational play in parts of the game tree that can only be reached by the players making mistakes. This can be problematic when operationalizing equilibria in the real world among imperfect players. Trembling-hand refinements are a sound remedy to this issue, and are subsets of Nash equilibria that are designed to handle the possibility that any of the players may make mistakes. In this paper, we initiate the study of equilibrium refinements for settings where one of the players is perfectly rational (the ``machine'') and the other may make mistakes. As we show, this endeavor has many pitfalls: many intuitively appealing approaches to refinement fail in various ways. On the positive side, we introduce a modification of the classical quasi-perfect equilibrium (QPE) refinement, which we call the one-sided quasi-perfect equilibrium. Unlike QPE, one-sided QPE only accounts for mistakes from one player and assumes that no mistakes will be made by the machine. We present experiments on standard benchmark games and an endgame from the famous man-machine match where the AI Libratus was the first to beat top human specialist professionals in heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em poker. We show that one-sided QPE can be computed more efficiently than all known prior refinements, paving the way to wider adoption of Nash equilibrium refinements in settings with perfectly rational machines (or humans perfectly actuating machine-generated strategies) that interact with players prone to mistakes. We also show that one-sided QPE tends to play better than a Nash equilibrium strategy against imperfect opponents.
El Mehdi Saad, Gilles Blanchard
tl;dr: We study the impact of restricted access to information on the generalization error in the setting of prediction with expert advice.
We investigate the problem of minimizing the excess generalization error with respect to the best expert prediction in a finite family in the stochastic setting, under limited access to information. We consider that the learner has only access to a limited number of expert advices per training round, as well as for prediction. Assuming that the loss function is Lipschitz and strongly convex, we show that if we are allowed to see the advice of only one expert per round in the training phase, or to use the advice of only one expert for prediction in the test phase, the worst-case excess risk is ${\Omega}(1/\sqrt{T})$ with probability lower bounded by a constant. However, if we are allowed to see at least two actively chosen expert advices per training round and use at least two experts for prediction, the fast rate $\mathcal{O}(1/T)$ can be achieved. We design novel algorithms achieving this rate in this setting, and in the setting where the learner have a budget constraint on the total number of observed experts advices, and give precise instance-dependent bounds on the number of training rounds needed to achieve a given generalization error precision.
Yura Perugachi-Diaz, Jakub Mikolaj Tomczak, Sandjai Bhulai
tl;dr: Invertible DenseNets: An extension of Residual Flows based on the Lipschitz continuity of concatenation and CLipSwish activation functions.
We introduce Invertible Dense Networks (i-DenseNets), a more parameter efficient extension of Residual Flows. The method relies on an analysis of the Lipschitz continuity of the concatenation in DenseNets, where we enforce invertibility of the network by satisfying the Lipschitz constant. Furthermore, we propose a learnable weighted concatenation, which not only improves the model performance but also indicates the importance of the concatenated weighted representation. Additionally, we introduce the Concatenated LipSwish as activation function, for which we show how to enforce the Lipschitz condition and which boosts performance. The new architecture, i-DenseNet, out-performs Residual Flow and other flow-based models on density estimation evaluated in bits per dimension, where we utilize an equal parameter budget. Moreover, we show that the proposed model out-performs Residual Flows when trained as a hybrid model where the model is both a generative and a discriminative model.
Magnus Ross, Michael Thomas Smith, Mauricio A Álvarez
This paper introduces a method for the nonparametric Bayesian learning of nonlinear operators, through the use of the Volterra series with kernels represented using Gaussian processes (GPs), which we term the nonparametric Volterra kernels model (NVKM). When the input function to the operator is unobserved and has a GP prior, the NVKM constitutes a powerful method for both single and multiple output regression, and can be viewed as a nonlinear and nonparametric latent force model. When the input function is observed, the NVKM can be used to perform Bayesian system identification. We use recent advances in efficient sampling of explicit functions from GPs to map process realisations through the Volterra series without resorting to numerical integration, allowing scalability through doubly stochastic variational inference, and avoiding the need for Gaussian approximations of the output processes. We demonstrate the performance of the model for both multiple output regression and system identification using standard benchmarks.
Atara Kaplan, Dan Garber
tl;dr: Provable convergence of a fast first-order method for nonsmooth convex low-rank matrix problems using only low-rank SVDs
Low-rank and nonsmooth matrix optimization problems capture many fundamental tasks in statistics and machine learning. While significant progress has been made in recent years in developing efficient methods for \textit{smooth} low-rank optimization problems that avoid maintaining high-rank matrices and computing expensive high-rank SVDs, advances for nonsmooth problems have been slow paced. In this paper we consider standard convex relaxations for such problems. Mainly, we prove that under a natural \textit{generalized strict complementarity} condition and under the relatively mild assumption that the nonsmooth objective can be written as a maximum of smooth functions, the \textit{extragradient method}, when initialized with a "warm-start'' point, converges to an optimal solution with rate $O(1/t)$ while requiring only two \textit{low-rank} SVDs per iteration. We give a precise trade-off between the rank of the SVDs required and the radius of the ball in which we need to initialize the method. We support our theoretical results with empirical experiments on several nonsmooth low-rank matrix recovery tasks, demonstrating that using simple initializations, the extragradient method produces exactly the same iterates when full-rank SVDs are replaced with SVDs of rank that matches the rank of the (low-rank) ground-truth matrix to be recovered.
Octavian-Eugen Ganea, Lagnajit Pattanaik, Connor W. Coley, Regina Barzilay, Klavs Jensen, William Green, Tommi S. Jaakkola
tl;dr: We generate ensembles of molecular 3D conformers from the input molecular graph in an end-to-end fashion by explicitly modeling local atomic 3D structures, torsion angles, chirality, and other geometric elements.
Prediction of a molecule’s 3D conformer ensemble from the molecular graph holds a key role in areas of cheminformatics and drug discovery. Existing generative models have several drawbacks including lack of modeling important molecular geometry elements (e.g., torsion angles), separate optimization stages prone to error accumulation, and the need for structure fine-tuning based on approximate classical force-fields or computationally expensive methods. We propose GEOMOL --- an end-to-end, non-autoregressive, and SE(3)-invariant machine learning approach to generate distributions of low-energy molecular 3D conformers. Leveraging the power of message passing neural networks (MPNNs) to capture local and global graph information, we predict local atomic 3D structures and torsion angles, avoid- ing unnecessary over-parameterization of the geometric degrees of freedom (e.g., one angle per non-terminal bond). Such local predictions suffice both for both the training loss computation and for the full deterministic conformer assembly (at test time). We devise a non-adversarial optimal transport based loss function to promote diverse conformer generation. GEOMOL predominantly outperforms popular open-source, commercial, or state-of-the-art machine learning (ML) models, while achieving significant speed-ups. We expect such differentiable 3D structure generators to significantly impact molecular modeling and related applications.
Bruno Loureiro, Gabriele Sicuro, Cedric Gerbelot, Alessandro Pacco, Florent Krzakala, Lenka Zdeborova
tl;dr: We give a rigorous formula for the error of generalised linear models fitting mixtures of Gaussian in high-dimensions.
Generalised linear models for multi-class classification problems are one of the fundamental building blocks of modern machine learning tasks. In this manuscript, we characterise the learning of a mixture of $K$ Gaussians with generic means and covariances via empirical risk minimisation (ERM) with any convex loss and regularisation. In particular, we prove exact asymptotics characterising the ERM estimator in high-dimensions, extending several previous results about Gaussian mixture classification in the literature. We exemplify our result in two tasks of interest in statistical learning: a) classification for a mixture with sparse means, where we study the efficiency of $\ell_1$ penalty with respect to $\ell_2$; b) max-margin multi-class classification, where we characterise the phase transition on the existence of the multi-class logistic maximum likelihood estimator for $K>2$. Finally, we discuss how our theory can be applied beyond the scope of synthetic data, showing that in different cases Gaussian mixtures capture closely the learning curve of classification tasks in real data sets.
Alberto Bietti, Luca Venturi, Joan Bruna
tl;dr: We quantify the gains in sample complexity of learning functions with prescribed invariance or geometric stability in a non-parametric setting
Many supervised learning problems involve high-dimensional data such as images, text, or graphs. In order to make efficient use of data, it is often useful to leverage certain geometric priors in the problem at hand, such as invariance to translations, permutation subgroups, or stability to small deformations. We study the sample complexity of learning problems where the target function presents such invariance and stability properties, by considering spherical harmonic decompositions of such functions on the sphere. We provide non-parametric rates of convergence for kernel methods, and show improvements in sample complexity by a factor equal to the size of the group when using an invariant kernel over the group, compared to the corresponding non-invariant kernel. These improvements are valid when the sample size is large enough, with an asymptotic behavior that depends on spectral properties of the group. Finally, these gains are extended beyond invariance groups to also cover geometric stability to small deformations, modeled here as subsets (not necessarily subgroups) of permutations.
Nina Balcan, Siddharth Prasad, Tuomas Sandholm, Ellen Vitercik
Cutting-plane methods have enabled remarkable successes in integer programming over the last few decades. State-of-the-art solvers integrate a myriad of cutting-plane techniques to speed up the underlying tree-search algorithm used to find optimal solutions. In this paper we provide sample complexity bounds for cut-selection in branch-and-cut (B&C). Given a training set of integer programs sampled from an application-specific input distribution and a family of cut selection policies, these guarantees bound the number of samples sufficient to ensure that using any policy in the family, the size of the tree B&C builds on average over the training set is close to the expected size of the tree B&C builds. We first bound the sample complexity of learning cutting planes from the canonical family of Chvátal-Gomory cuts. Our bounds handle any number of waves of any number of cuts and are fine tuned to the magnitudes of the constraint coefficients. Next, we prove sample complexity bounds for more sophisticated cut selection policies that use a combination of scoring rules to choose from a family of cuts. Finally, beyond the realm of cutting planes for integer programming, we develop a general abstraction of tree search that captures key components such as node selection and variable selection. For this abstraction, we bound the sample complexity of learning a good policy for building the search tree.
Yunzhen Yao, Liangzu Peng, Manolis C. Tsakiris
We introduce robust principal component analysis from a data matrix in which the entries of its columns have been corrupted by permutations, termed Unlabeled Principal Component Analysis (UPCA). Using algebraic geometry, we establish that UPCA is a well-defined algebraic problem in the sense that the only matrices of minimal rank that agree with the given data are row-permutations of the ground-truth matrix, arising as the unique solutions of a polynomial system of equations. Further, we propose an efficient two-stage algorithmic pipeline for UPCA suitable for the practically relevant case where only a fraction of the data have been permuted. Stage-I employs outlier-robust PCA methods to estimate the ground-truth column-space. Equipped with the column-space, Stage-II applies recent methods for unlabeled sensing to restore the permuted data. Experiments on synthetic data, face images, educational and medical records reveal the potential of UPCA for applications such as data privatization and record linkage.
Quentin Rebjock, Baris Kurt, Tim Januschowski, Laurent Callot
tl;dr: We develop false discovery rate control methods for online time-series anomaly detection.
This article proposes novel rules for false discovery rate control (FDRC) geared towards online anomaly detection in time series. Online FDRC rules allow to control the properties of a sequence of statistical tests. In the context of anomaly detection, the null hypothesis is that an observation is normal and the alternative is that it is anomalous. FDRC rules allow users to target a lower bound on precision in unsupervised settings. The methods proposed in this article overcome short-comings of previous FDRC rules in the context of anomaly detection, in particular ensuring that power remains high even when the alternative is exceedingly rare (typical in anomaly detection) and the test statistics are serially dependent (typical in time series). We show the soundness of these rules in both theory and experiments.
Shubhada Agrawal, Wouter M Koolen, Sandeep Kumar Juneja
tl;dr: We consider the best-arm identification problem in the multi-armed bandit framework where an arm with the smallest tail-risk measure is identified.
Conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) and value-at-risk (VaR) are popular tail-risk measures in finance and insurance industries as well as in highly reliable, safety-critical uncertain environments where often the underlying probability distributions are heavy-tailed. We use the multi-armed bandit best-arm identification framework and consider the problem of identifying the arm from amongst finitely many that has the smallest CVaR, VaR, or weighted sum of CVaR and mean. The latter captures the risk-return trade-off common in finance. Our main contribution is an optimal $\delta$-correct algorithm that acts on general arms, including heavy-tailed distributions, and matches the lower bound on the expected number of samples needed, asymptotically (as $ \delta$ approaches $0$). The algorithm requires solving a non-convex optimization problem in the space of probability measures, that requires delicate analysis. En-route, we develop new non-asymptotic, anytime-valid, empirical-likelihood-based concentration inequalities for tail-risk measures.
Feng Liu, Xiaoming Liu
tl;dr: We propose a novel voxel-based 3D detection and reconstruction framework, which infers the 3D locations and 3D surfaces for multiple object instances with only a 2D image as input.
Inferring 3D locations and shapes of multiple objects from a single 2D image is a long-standing objective of computer vision. Most of the existing works either predict one of these 3D properties or focus on solving both for a single object. One fundamental challenge lies in how to learn an effective representation of the image that is well-suited for 3D detection and reconstruction. In this work, we propose to learn a regular grid of 3D voxel features from the input image which is aligned with 3D scene space via a 3D feature lifting operator. Based on the 3D voxel features, our novel CenterNet-3D detection head formulates the 3D detection as keypoint detection in the 3D space. Moreover, we devise an efficient coarse-to-fine reconstruction module, including coarse-level voxelization and a novel local PCA-SDF shape representation, which enables fine detail reconstruction and two orders of magnitude faster inference than prior methods. With complementary supervision from both 3D detection and reconstruction, one enables the 3D voxel features to be geometry and context preserving, benefiting both tasks. The effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated through 3D detection and reconstruction on single-object and multiple-object scenarios.
Bicheng Ying, Kun Yuan, Yiming Chen, Hanbin Hu, Pan Pan, Wotao Yin
tl;dr: We theoretically establish that static and one-peer exponential graphs endow decentralized SGD with fast and high-quality training performance
Decentralized SGD is an emerging training method for deep learning known for its much less (thus faster) communication per iteration, which relaxes the averaging step in parallel SGD to inexact averaging. The less exact the averaging is, however, the more the total iterations the training needs to take. Therefore, the key to making decentralized SGD efficient is to realize nearly-exact averaging using little communication. This requires a skillful choice of communication topology, which is an under-studied topic in decentralized optimization. In this paper, we study so-called exponential graphs where every node is connected to $O(\log(n))$ neighbors and $n$ is the total number of nodes. This work proves such graphs can lead to both fast communication and effective averaging simultaneously. We also discover that a sequence of $\log(n)$ one-peer exponential graphs, in which each node communicates to one single neighbor per iteration, can together achieve exact averaging. This favorable property enables one-peer exponential graph to average as effective as its static counterpart but communicates more efficiently. We apply these exponential graphs in decentralized (momentum) SGD to obtain the state-of-the-art balance between per-iteration communication and iteration complexity among all commonly-used topologies. Experimental results on a variety of tasks and models demonstrate that decentralized (momentum) SGD over exponential graphs promises both fast and high-quality training. Our code is implemented through BlueFog and available at https://github.com/Bluefog-Lib/NeurIPS2021-Exponential-Graph.
Duligur Ibeling, Thomas F Icard
This paper presents a topological learning-theoretic perspective on causal inference by introducing a series of topologies defined on general spaces of structural causal models (SCMs). As an illustration of the framework we prove a topological causal hierarchy theorem, showing that substantive assumption-free causal inference is possible only in a meager set of SCMs. Thanks to a known correspondence between open sets in the weak topology and statistically verifiable hypotheses, our results show that inductive assumptions sufficient to license valid causal inferences are statistically unverifiable in principle. Similar to no-free-lunch theorems for statistical inference, the present results clarify the inevitability of substantial assumptions for causal inference. An additional benefit of our topological approach is that it easily accommodates SCMs with infinitely many variables. We finally suggest that our framework may be helpful for the positive project of exploring and assessing alternative causal-inductive assumptions.
Zinan Lin, Vyas Sekar, Giulia Fanti
tl;dr: We study theoretically how spectral normalization stabilizes GANs.
Spectral normalization (SN) is a widely-used technique for improving the stability and sample quality of Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs). However, current understanding of SN's efficacy is limited. In this work, we show that SN controls two important failure modes of GAN training: exploding and vanishing gradients. Our proofs illustrate a (perhaps unintentional) connection with the successful LeCun initialization. This connection helps to explain why the most popular implementation of SN for GANs requires no hyper-parameter tuning, whereas stricter implementations of SN have poor empirical performance out-of-the-box. Unlike LeCun initialization which only controls gradient vanishing at the beginning of training, SN preserves this property throughout training. Building on this theoretical understanding, we propose a new spectral normalization technique: Bidirectional Scaled Spectral Normalization (BSSN), which incorporates insights from later improvements to LeCun initialization: Xavier initialization and Kaiming initialization. Theoretically, we show that BSSN gives better gradient control than SN. Empirically, we demonstrate that it outperforms SN in sample quality and training stability on several benchmark datasets.
Wenshuo Guo, Michael Jordan, Emmanouil Zampetakis
tl;dr: We propose new algorithms for learning multi-bidder revenue-optimal auctions from adversarially corrupted samples, providing robustness theorems and sample complexity bounds for various valuation distributions with optimality guarantees.
We study the problem of learning revenue-optimal multi-bidder auctions from samples when the samples of bidders' valuations can be adversarially corrupted or drawn from distributions that are adversarially perturbed. First, we prove tight upper bounds on the revenue we can obtain with a corrupted distribution under a population model, for both regular valuation distributions and distributions with monotone hazard rate (MHR). We then propose new algorithms that, given only an ``approximate distribution'' for the bidder's valuation, can learn a mechanism whose revenue is nearly optimal simultaneously for all ``true distributions'' that are $\alpha$-close to the original distribution in Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance. The proposed algorithms operate beyond the setting of bounded distributions that have been studied in prior works, and are guaranteed to obtain a fraction $1-O(\alpha)$ of the optimal revenue under the true distribution when the distributions are MHR. Moreover, they are guaranteed to yield at least a fraction $1-O(\sqrt{\alpha})$ of the optimal revenue when the distributions are regular. We prove that these upper bounds cannot be further improved, by providing matching lower bounds. Lastly, we derive sample complexity upper bounds for learning a near-optimal auction for both MHR and regular distributions.
Hao Liu, Pieter Abbeel
tl;dr: We present an unsupervised pre-training RL method that is based on particle-based state entropy maximization and it outperforms canonical RL methods.
We introduce a new unsupervised pre-training method for reinforcement learning called APT, which stands for Active Pre-Training. APT learns behaviors and representations by actively searching for novel states in reward-free environments. The key novel idea is to explore the environment by maximizing a non-parametric entropy computed in an abstract representation space, which avoids challenging density modeling and consequently allows our approach to scale much better in environments that have high-dimensional observations (e.g., image observations). We empirically evaluate APT by exposing task-specific reward after a long unsupervised pre-training phase. In Atari games, APT achieves human-level performance on 12 games and obtains highly competitive performance compared to canonical fully supervised RL algorithms. On DMControl suite, APT beats all baselines in terms of asymptotic performance and data efficiency and dramatically improves performance on tasks that are extremely difficult to train from scratch.
Sina Akbari, Ehsan Mokhtarian, AmirEmad Ghassami, Negar Kiyavash
tl;dr: We proposed a recursive structure learning approach capable of handling latent and selection variables.
We consider the problem of learning the causal MAG of a system from observational data in the presence of latent variables and selection bias. Constraint-based methods are one of the main approaches for solving this problem, but the existing methods are either computationally impractical when dealing with large graphs or lacking completeness guarantees. We propose a novel computationally efficient recursive constraint-based method that is sound and complete. The key idea of our approach is that at each iteration a specific type of variable is identified and removed. This allows us to learn the structure efficiently and recursively, as this technique reduces both the number of required conditional independence (CI) tests and the size of the conditioning sets. The former substantially reduces the computational complexity, while the latter results in more reliable CI tests. We provide an upper bound on the number of required CI tests in the worst case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the tightest bound in the literature. We further provide a lower bound on the number of CI tests required by any constraint-based method. The upper bound of our proposed approach and the lower bound at most differ by a factor equal to the number of variables in the worst case. We provide experimental results to compare the proposed approach with the state of the art on both synthetic and real-world structures.
Guan-Horng Liu, Tianrong Chen, Evangelos Theodorou
tl;dr: An efficient second-order optimizer for training Neural ODEs that achieves superior convergence against first-order methods in wall-clock time on various applications.
We propose a novel second-order optimization framework for training the emerging deep continuous-time models, specifically the Neural Ordinary Differential Equations (Neural ODEs). Since their training already involves expensive gradient computation by solving a backward ODE, deriving efficient second-order methods becomes highly nontrivial. Nevertheless, inspired by the recent Optimal Control (OC) interpretation of training deep networks, we show that a specific continuous-time OC methodology, called Differential Programming, can be adopted to derive backward ODEs for higher-order derivatives at the same O(1) memory cost. We further explore a low-rank representation of the second-order derivatives and show that it leads to efficient preconditioned updates with the aid of Kronecker-based factorization. The resulting method – named SNOpt – converges much faster than first-order baselines in wall-clock time, and the improvement remains consistent across various applications, e.g. image classification, generative flow, and time-series prediction. Our framework also enables direct architecture optimization, such as the integration time of Neural ODEs, with second-order feedback policies, strengthening the OC perspective as a principled tool of analyzing optimization in deep learning. Our code is available at https://github.com/ghliu/snopt.
Qizhou Wang, Feng Liu, Bo Han, Tongliang Liu, Chen Gong, Gang Niu, Mingyuan Zhou, Masashi Sugiyama
Reweighting adversarial data during training has been recently shown to improve adversarial robustness, where data closer to the current decision boundaries are regarded as more critical and given larger weights. However, existing methods measuring the closeness are not very reliable: they are discrete and can take only a few values, and they are path-dependent, i.e., they may change given the same start and end points with different attack paths. In this paper, we propose three types of probabilistic margin (PM), which are continuous and path-independent, for measuring the aforementioned closeness and reweighing adversarial data. Specifically, a PM is defined as the difference between two estimated class-posterior probabilities, e.g., such a probability of the true label minus the probability of the most confusing label given some natural data. Though different PMs capture different geometric properties, all three PMs share a negative correlation with the vulnerability of data: data with larger/smaller PMs are safer/riskier and should have smaller/larger weights. Experiments demonstrated that PMs are reliable and PM-based reweighting methods outperformed state-of-the-art counterparts.
Yang Zhang, Ashkan Khakzar, Yawei Li, Azade Farshad, Seong Tae Kim, Nassir Navab
tl;dr: We propose a feature attribution method via identifying input features with predictive information.
One principal approach for illuminating a black-box neural network is feature attribution, i.e. identifying the importance of input features for the network’s prediction. The predictive information of features is recently proposed as a proxy for the measure of their importance. So far, the predictive information is only identified for latent features by placing an information bottleneck within the network. We propose a method to identify features with predictive information in the input domain. The method results in fine-grained identification of input features' information and is agnostic to network architecture. The core idea of our method is leveraging a bottleneck on the input that only lets input features associated with predictive latent features pass through. We compare our method with several feature attribution methods using mainstream feature attribution evaluation experiments. The code is publicly available.
Robin Winter, Frank Noe, Djork-Arne Clevert
tl;dr: We propose a variational autoencoder that encodes graphs in a fixed-size latent space that is invariant under permutation of the input graph.
Recently, there has been great success in applying deep neural networks on graph structured data. Most work, however, focuses on either node- or graph-level supervised learning, such as node, link or graph classification or node-level unsupervised learning (e.g. node clustering). Despite its wide range of possible applications, graph-level unsupervised learning has not received much attention yet. This might be mainly attributed to the high representation complexity of graphs, which can be represented by $n!$ equivalent adjacency matrices, where $n$ is the number of nodes. In this work we address this issue by proposing a permutation-invariant variational autoencoder for graph structured data. Our proposed model indirectly learns to match the node ordering of input and output graph, without imposing a particular node ordering or performing expensive graph matching. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model for graph reconstruction, generation and interpolation and evaluate the expressive power of extracted representations for downstream graph-level classification and regression.
Fan Wu, Patrick Rebeschini
We study discrete-time mirror descent applied to the unregularized empirical risk in matrix sensing. In both the general case of rectangular matrices and the particular case of positive semidefinite matrices, a simple potential-based analysis in terms of the Bregman divergence allows us to establish convergence of mirror descent---with different choices of the mirror maps---to a matrix that, among all global minimizers of the empirical risk, minimizes a quantity explicitly related to the nuclear norm, the Frobenius norm, and the von Neumann entropy. In both cases, this characterization implies that mirror descent, a first-order algorithm minimizing the unregularized empirical risk, recovers low-rank matrices under the same set of assumptions that are sufficient to guarantee recovery for nuclear-norm minimization. When the sensing matrices are symmetric and commute, we show that gradient descent with full-rank factorized parametrization is a first-order approximation to mirror descent, in which case we obtain an explicit characterization of the implicit bias of gradient flow as a by-product.
Joseph Marino, Alexandre Piché, Alessandro Davide Ialongo, Yisong Yue
tl;dr: We connect KL-regularized policy networks with amortization and propose an iterative amortized policy optimization scheme with novel benefits and performance improvements.
Policy networks are a central feature of deep reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms for continuous control, enabling the estimation and sampling of high-value actions. From the variational inference perspective on RL, policy networks, when used with entropy or KL regularization, are a form of amortized optimization, optimizing network parameters rather than the policy distributions directly. However, direct amortized mappings can yield suboptimal policy estimates and restricted distributions, limiting performance and exploration. Given this perspective, we consider the more flexible class of iterative amortized optimizers. We demonstrate that the resulting technique, iterative amortized policy optimization, yields performance improvements over direct amortization on benchmark continuous control tasks.
Ashwinkumar Ganesan, Hang Gao, Sunil Gandhi, Edward Raff, Tim Oates, James Holt, Mark McLean
tl;dr: An approach to do symbolic AI using vectors from the 90s has been long neglected by ML ressearches, but some careful updates make it applicable to modern use.
Holographic Reduced Representations (HRR) are a method for performing symbolic AI on top of real-valued vectors by associating each vector with an abstract concept, and providing mathematical operations to manipulate vectors as if they were classic symbolic objects. This method has seen little use outside of older symbolic AI work and cognitive science. Our goal is to revisit this approach to understand if it is viable for enabling a hybrid neural-symbolic approach to learning as a differential component of a deep learning architecture. HRRs today are not effective in a differential solution due to numerical instability, a problem we solve by introducing a projection step that forces the vectors to exist in a well behaved point in space. In doing so we improve the concept retrieval efficacy of HRRs by over $100\times$. Using multi-label classification we demonstrate how to leverage the symbolic HRR properties to develop a output layer and loss function that is able to learn effectively, and allows us to investigate some of the pros and cons of an HRR neuro-symbolic learning approach.
JAEHOON LEE, Jihyeon Hyeong, Jinsung Jeon, Noseong Park, Jihoon Cho
tl;dr: Synthesize tabular data with GANs
Tabular data synthesis has received wide attention in the literature. This is because available data is often limited, incomplete, or cannot be obtained easily, and data privacy is becoming increasingly important. In this work, we present a generalized GAN framework for tabular synthesis, which combines the adversarial training of GANs and the negative log-density regularization of invertible neural networks. The proposed framework can be used for two distinctive objectives. First, we can further improve the synthesis quality, by decreasing the negative log-density of real records in the process of adversarial training. On the other hand, by increasing the negative log-density of real records, realistic fake records can be synthesized in a way that they are not too much close to real records and reduce the chance of potential information leakage. We conduct experiments with real-world datasets for classification, regression, and privacy attacks. In general, the proposed method demonstrates the best synthesis quality (in terms of task-oriented evaluation metrics, e.g., F1) when decreasing the negative log-density during the adversarial training. If increasing the negative log-density, our experimental results show that the distance between real and fake records increases, enhancing robustness against privacy attacks.
Shuli Jiang, Hai Pham, David Woodruff, Qiuyi Zhang
Matrix trace estimation is ubiquitous in machine learning applications and has traditionally relied on Hutchinson's method, which requires $O(\log(1/\delta)/\epsilon^2)$ matrix-vector product queries to achieve a $(1 \pm \epsilon)$-multiplicative approximation to $\text{trace}(A)$ with failure probability $\delta$ on positive-semidefinite input matrices $A$. Recently, the Hutch++ algorithm was proposed, which reduces the number of matrix-vector queries from $O(1/\epsilon^2)$ to the optimal $O(1/\epsilon)$, and the algorithm succeeds with constant probability. However, in the high probability setting, the non-adaptive Hutch++ algorithm suffers an extra $O(\sqrt{\log(1/\delta)})$ multiplicative factor in its query complexity. Non-adaptive methods are important, as they correspond to sketching algorithms, which are mergeable, highly parallelizable, and provide low-memory streaming algorithms as well as low-communication distributed protocols. In this work, we close the gap between non-adaptive and adaptive algorithms, showing that even non-adaptive algorithms can achieve $O(\sqrt{\log(1/\delta)}/\epsilon + \log(1/\delta))$ matrix-vector products. In addition, we prove matching lower bounds demonstrating that, up to a $\log \log(1/\delta)$ factor, no further improvement in the dependence on $\delta$ or $\epsilon$ is possible by any non-adaptive algorithm. Finally, our experiments demonstrate the superior performance of our sketch over the adaptive Hutch++ algorithm, which is less parallelizable, as well as over the non-adaptive Hutchinson's method.
Arsha Nagrani, Shan Yang, Anurag Arnab, Aren Jansen, Cordelia Schmid, Chen Sun
tl;dr: We propose a new multimodal fusion model for video that exchanges cross-modal information between modalities via a small number of 'attention bottleneck' latents, achieving state of the art results for video classification.
Humans perceive the world by concurrently processing and fusing high-dimensional inputs from multiple modalities such as vision and audio. Machine perception models, in stark contrast, are typically modality-specific and optimised for unimodal benchmarks. A common approach for building multimodal models is to simply combine multiple of these modality-specific architectures using late-stage fusion of final representations or predictions ('late-fusion'). Instead, we introduce a novel transformer based architecture that uses 'attention bottlenecks' for modality fusion at multiple layers. Compared to traditional pairwise self-attention, these bottlenecks force information between different modalities to pass through a small number of '`bottleneck' latent units, requiring the model to collate and condense the most relevant information in each modality and only share what is necessary. We find that such a strategy improves fusion performance, at the same time reducing computational cost. We conduct thorough ablation studies, and achieve state-of-the-art results on multiple audio-visual classification benchmarks including Audioset, Epic-Kitchens and VGGSound. All code and models will be released.
Konrad Czechowski, Tomasz Odrzygóźdź, Marek Zbysiński, Michał Zawalski, Krzysztof Olejnik, Yuhuai Wu, Łukasz Kuciński, Piotr Miłoś
tl;dr: We propose a hierarchical search method for complex reasoning domains, based on learned subgoal generator.
Humans excel in solving complex reasoning tasks through a mental process of moving from one idea to a related one. Inspired by this, we propose Subgoal Search (kSubS) method. Its key component is a learned subgoal generator that produces a diversity of subgoals that are both achievable and closer to the solution. Using subgoals reduces the search space and induces a high-level search graph suitable for efficient planning. In this paper, we implement kSubS using a transformer-based subgoal module coupled with the classical best-first search framework. We show that a simple approach of generating $k$-th step ahead subgoals is surprisingly efficient on three challenging domains: two popular puzzle games, Sokoban and the Rubik's Cube, and an inequality proving benchmark INT. kSubS achieves strong results including state-of-the-art on INT within a modest computational budget.
Christoph Dann, Teodor Vanislavov Marinov, Mehryar Mohri, Julian Zimmert
tl;dr: We provide improved gap-dependent regret bounds for reinforcement learning in finite episodic Markov decision processes.
We provide improved gap-dependent regret bounds for reinforcement learning in finite episodic Markov decision processes. Compared to prior work, our bounds depend on alternative definitions of gaps. These definitions are based on the insight that, in order to achieve a favorable regret, an algorithm does not need to learn how to behave optimally in states that are not reached by an optimal policy. We prove tighter upper regret bounds for optimistic algorithms and accompany them with new information-theoretic lower bounds for a large class of MDPs. Our results show that optimistic algorithms can not achieve the information-theoretic lower bounds even in deterministic MDPs unless there is a unique optimal policy.
Chenghao Li, Tonghan Wang, Chengjie Wu, Qianchuan Zhao, Jun Yang, Chongjie Zhang
tl;dr: Encouraging agents to be diverse when necessary while maintaining the merits of parameter sharing, our method achieves state-of-the-art performance on Google Research Football and super hard StarCraft II micromanagement tasks.
Recently, deep multi-agent reinforcement learning (MARL) has shown the promise to solve complex cooperative tasks. Its success is partly because of parameter sharing among agents. However, such sharing may lead agents to behave similarly and limit their coordination capacity. In this paper, we aim to introduce diversity in both optimization and representation of shared multi-agent reinforcement learning. Specifically, we propose an information-theoretical regularization to maximize the mutual information between agents' identities and their trajectories, encouraging extensive exploration and diverse individualized behaviors. In representation, we incorporate agent-specific modules in the shared neural network architecture, which are regularized by L1-norm to promote learning sharing among agents while keeping necessary diversity. Empirical results show that our method achieves state-of-the-art performance on Google Research Football and super hard StarCraft II micromanagement tasks.
Yujia Yan, Frank Cwitkowitz, Zhiyao Duan
tl;dr: We propose a novel piano transcription system that is simple, fast, and well-performing.
Piano transcription systems are typically optimized to estimate pitch activity at each frame of audio. They are often followed by carefully designed heuristics and post-processing algorithms to estimate note events from the frame-level predictions. Recent methods have also framed piano transcription as a multi-task learning problem, where the activation of different stages of a note event are estimated independently. These practices are not well aligned with the desired outcome of the task, which is the specification of note intervals as holistic events, rather than the aggregation of disjoint observations. In this work, we propose a novel formulation of piano transcription, which is optimized to directly predict note events. Our method is based on Semi-Markov Conditional Random Fields (semi-CRF), which produce scores for intervals rather than individual frames. When formulating piano transcription in this way, we eliminate the need to rely on disjoint frame-level estimates for different stages of a note event. We conduct experiments on the MAESTRO dataset and demonstrate that the proposed model surpasses the current state-of-the-art for piano transcription. Our results suggest that the semi-CRF output layer, while still quadratic in complexity, is a simple, fast and well-performing solution for event-based prediction, and may lead to similar success in other areas which currently rely on frame-level estimates.
Jiaming Liu, Salman Asif, Brendt Wohlberg, Ulugbek Kamilov
tl;dr: We provide new recovery bounds for PnP under assumptions used in compressed sensing for generative models.
The plug-and-play priors (PnP) and regularization by denoising (RED) methods have become widely used for solving inverse problems by leveraging pre-trained deep denoisers as image priors. While the empirical imaging performance and the theoretical convergence properties of these algorithms have been widely investigated, their recovery properties have not previously been theoretically analyzed. We address this gap by showing how to establish theoretical recovery guarantees for PnP/RED by assuming that the solution of these methods lies near the fixed-points of a deep neural network. We also present numerical results comparing the recovery performance of PnP/RED in compressive sensing against that of recent compressive sensing algorithms based on generative models. Our numerical results suggest that PnP with a pre-trained artifact removal network provides significantly better results compared to the existing state-of-the-art methods.
Max Ryabinin, Eduard Gorbunov, Vsevolod Plokhotnyuk, Gennady Pekhimenko
tl;dr: We propose a new iterative communication-efficient method for decentralized optimization, demonstrating its efficiency both theoretically and in large-scale experiments.
Training deep neural networks on large datasets can often be accelerated by using multiple compute nodes. This approach, known as distributed training, can utilize hundreds of computers via specialized message-passing protocols such as Ring All-Reduce. However, running these protocols at scale requires reliable high-speed networking that is only available in dedicated clusters. In contrast, many real-world applications, such as federated learning and cloud-based distributed training, operate on unreliable devices with unstable network bandwidth. As a result, these applications are restricted to using parameter servers or gossip-based averaging protocols. In this work, we lift that restriction by proposing Moshpit All-Reduce — an iterative averaging protocol that exponentially converges to the global average. We demonstrate the efficiency of our protocol for distributed optimization with strong theoretical guarantees. The experiments show 1.3x speedup for ResNet-50 training on ImageNet compared to competitive gossip-based strategies and 1.5x speedup when training ALBERT-large on preemptible compute nodes.
Naren Sarayu Manoj, Avrim Blum
tl;dr: We explore statistical and computational properties of backdoor data poisoning attacks.
A backdoor data poisoning attack is an adversarial attack wherein the attacker injects several watermarked, mislabeled training examples into a training set. The watermark does not impact the test-time performance of the model on typical data; however, the model reliably errs on watermarked examples. To gain a better foundational understanding of backdoor data poisoning attacks, we present a formal theoretical framework within which one can discuss backdoor data poisoning attacks for classification problems. We then use this to analyze important statistical and computational issues surrounding these attacks. On the statistical front, we identify a parameter we call the memorization capacity that captures the intrinsic vulnerability of a learning problem to a backdoor attack. This allows us to argue about the robustness of several natural learning problems to backdoor attacks. Our results favoring the attacker involve presenting explicit constructions of backdoor attacks, and our robustness results show that some natural problem settings cannot yield successful backdoor attacks. From a computational standpoint, we show that under certain assumptions, adversarial training can detect the presence of backdoors in a training set. We then show that under similar assumptions, two closely related problems we call backdoor filtering and robust generalization are nearly equivalent. This implies that it is both asymptotically necessary and sufficient to design algorithms that can identify watermarked examples in the training set in order to obtain a learning algorithm that both generalizes well to unseen data and is robust to backdoors.
Albert Gu, Isys Johnson, Karan Goel, Khaled Kamal Saab, Tri Dao, Atri Rudra, Christopher Re
tl;dr: We introduce a new continuous-time sequence model based on state spaces that has properties of recurrence and convolutions and performs very well on long time series.
Recurrent neural networks (RNNs), temporal convolutions, and neural differential equations (NDEs) are popular families of deep learning models for time-series data, each with unique strengths and tradeoffs in modeling power and computational efficiency. We introduce a simple sequence model inspired by control systems that generalizes these approaches while addressing their shortcomings. The Linear State-Space Layer (LSSL) maps a sequence $u \mapsto y$ by simply simulating a linear continuous-time state-space representation $\dot{x} = Ax + Bu, y = Cx + Du$. Theoretically, we show that LSSL models are closely related to the three aforementioned families of models and inherit their strengths. For example, they generalize convolutions to continuous-time, explain common RNN heuristics, and share features of NDEs such as time-scale adaptation. We then incorporate and generalize recent theory on continuous-time memorization to introduce a trainable subset of structured matrices $A$ that endow LSSLs with long-range memory. Empirically, stacking LSSL layers into a simple deep neural network obtains state-of-the-art results across time series benchmarks for long dependencies in sequential image classification, real-world healthcare regression tasks, and speech. On a difficult speech classification task with length-16000 sequences, LSSL outperforms prior approaches by 24 accuracy points, and even outperforms baselines that use hand-crafted features on 100x shorter sequences.
Ganlin Song, Ruitu Xu, John Lafferty
Stochastic gradient descent with backpropagation is the workhorse of artificial neural networks. It has long been recognized that backpropagation fails to be a biologically plausible algorithm. Fundamentally, it is a non-local procedure---updating one neuron's synaptic weights requires knowledge of synaptic weights or receptive fields of downstream neurons. This limits the use of artificial neural networks as a tool for understanding the biological principles of information processing in the brain. Lillicrap et al. (2016) propose a more biologically plausible "feedback alignment" algorithm that uses random and fixed backpropagation weights, and show promising simulations. In this paper we study the mathematical properties of the feedback alignment procedure by analyzing convergence and alignment for two-layer networks under squared error loss. In the overparameterized setting, we prove that the error converges to zero exponentially fast, and also that regularization is necessary in order for the  parameters to become aligned with the random backpropagation weights. Simulations are given that are consistent with this analysis and suggest further generalizations. These results contribute to our understanding of how biologically plausible algorithms might carry out weight learning in a manner different from Hebbian learning, with performance that is comparable with the full non-local backpropagation algorithm.
Francesco D'Angelo, Vincent Fortuin
tl;dr: We show that adding a repulsive term to the gradient update of deep ensembles improves their uncertainty estimates and corresponds to a proper Bayesian approximation procedure.
Deep ensembles have recently gained popularity in the deep learning community for their conceptual simplicity and efficiency. However, maintaining functional diversity between ensemble members that are independently trained with gradient descent is challenging. This can lead to pathologies when adding more ensemble members, such as a saturation of the ensemble performance, which converges to the performance of a single model. Moreover, this does not only affect the quality of its predictions, but even more so the uncertainty estimates of the ensemble, and thus its performance on out-of-distribution data. We hypothesize that this limitation can be overcome by discouraging different ensemble members from collapsing to the same function. To this end, we introduce a kernelized repulsive term in the update rule of the deep ensembles. We show that this simple modification not only enforces and maintains diversity among the members but, even more importantly, transforms the maximum a posteriori inference into proper Bayesian inference. Namely, we show that the training dynamics of our proposed repulsive ensembles follow a Wasserstein gradient flow of the KL divergence with the true posterior. We study repulsive terms in weight and function space and empirically compare their performance to standard ensembles and Bayesian baselines on synthetic and real-world prediction tasks.
Kaiqing Zhang, Xiangyuan Zhang, Bin Hu, Tamer Basar
tl;dr: This paper provides the sample complexity for the global convergence of model-free policy gradient methods when applied to a class of non-convex linear robust control problems.
Direct policy search serves as one of the workhorses in modern reinforcement learning (RL), and its applications in continuous control tasks have recently attracted increasing attention. In this work, we investigate the convergence theory of policy gradient (PG) methods for learning the linear risk-sensitive and robust controller. In particular, we develop PG methods that can be implemented in a derivative-free fashion by sampling system trajectories, and establish both global convergence and sample complexity results in the solutions of two fundamental settings in risk-sensitive and robust control: the finite-horizon linear exponential quadratic Gaussian, and the finite-horizon linear-quadratic disturbance attenuation problems. As a by-product, our results also provide the first sample complexity for the global convergence of PG methods on solving zero-sum linear-quadratic dynamic games, a nonconvex-nonconcave minimax optimization problem that serves as a baseline setting in multi-agent reinforcement learning (MARL) with continuous spaces. One feature of our algorithms is that during the learning phase, a certain level of robustness/risk-sensitivity of the controller is preserved, which we termed as the implicit regularization property, and is an essential requirement in safety-critical control systems.
Xudong XU, Xingang Pan, Dahua Lin, Bo Dai
tl;dr: We propose Generative Occupancy Fields(GOF), a 3D-aware generative model that could synthesize realistic images with 3D consistency and simultaneously learn compact object surfaces.
The advent of generative radiance fields has significantly promoted the development of 3D-aware image synthesis. The cumulative rendering process in radiance fields makes training these generative models much easier since gradients are distributed over the entire volume, but leads to diffused object surfaces. In the meantime, compared to radiance fields occupancy representations could inherently ensure deterministic surfaces. However, if we directly apply occupancy representations to generative models, during training they will only receive sparse gradients located on object surfaces and eventually suffer from the convergence problem. In this paper, we propose Generative Occupancy Fields (GOF), a novel model based on generative radiance fields that can learn compact object surfaces without impeding its training convergence. The key insight of GOF is a dedicated transition from the cumulative rendering in radiance fields to rendering with only the surface points as the learned surface gets more and more accurate. In this way, GOF combines the merits of two representations in a unified framework. In practice, the training-time transition of start from radiance fields and march to occupancy representations is achieved in GOF by gradually shrinking the sampling region in its rendering process from the entire volume to a minimal neighboring region around the surface. Through comprehensive experiments on multiple datasets, we demonstrate that GOF can synthesize high-quality images with 3D consistency and simultaneously learn compact and smooth object surfaces. Our code is available at https://github.com/SheldonTsui/GOF_NeurIPS2021.
Zhixuan Yu, Haozheng Yu, Long Sha, Sujoy Ganguly, Hyun Soo Park
This paper presents a new end-to-end semi-supervised framework to learn a dense keypoint detector using unlabeled multiview images. A key challenge lies in finding the exact correspondences between the dense keypoints in multiple views since the inverse of the keypoint mapping can be neither analytically derived nor differentiated. This limits applying existing multiview supervision approaches used to learn sparse keypoints that rely on the exact correspondences. To address this challenge, we derive a new probabilistic epipolar constraint that encodes the two desired properties. (1) Soft correspondence: we define a matchability, which measures a likelihood of a point matching to the other image’s corresponding point, thus relaxing the requirement of the exact correspondences. (2) Geometric consistency: every point in the continuous correspondence fields must satisfy the multiview consistency collectively. We formulate a probabilistic epipolar constraint using a weighted average of epipolar errors through the matchability thereby generalizing the point-to-point geometric error to the field-to-field geometric error. This generalization facilitates learning a geometrically coherent dense keypoint detection model by utilizing a large number of unlabeled multiview images. Additionally, to prevent degenerative cases, we employ a distillation-based regularization by using a pretrained model. Finally, we design a new neural network architecture, made of twin networks, that effectively minimizes the probabilistic epipolar errors of all possible correspondences between two view images by building affinity matrices. Our method shows superior performance compared to existing methods, including non-differentiable bootstrapping in terms of keypoint accuracy, multiview consistency, and 3D reconstruction accuracy.
Hugo Richard, Pierre Ablin, Bertrand Thirion, Alexandre Gramfort, Aapo Hyvarinen
tl;dr: A new probabilistic model and estimation algorithms for finding components shared by multiple subjects in neuroimaging data, combining theories of ICA, CCA, and shared response modelling
We consider shared response modeling, a multi-view learning problem where one wants to identify common components from multiple datasets or views. We introduce Shared Independent Component Analysis (ShICA) that models each view as a linear transform of shared independent components contaminated by additive Gaussian noise. We show that this model is identifiable if the components are either non-Gaussian or have enough diversity in noise variances. We then show that in some cases multi-set canonical correlation analysis can recover the correct unmixing matrices, but that even a small amount of sampling noise makes Multiset CCA fail. To solve this problem, we propose to use joint diagonalization after Multiset CCA, leading to a new approach called ShICA-J. We show via simulations that ShICA-J leads to improved results while being very fast to fit. While ShICA-J is based on second-order statistics, we further propose to leverage non-Gaussianity of the components using a maximum-likelihood method, ShICA-ML, that is both more accurate and more costly. Further, ShICA comes with a principled method for shared components estimation. Finally, we provide empirical evidence on fMRI and MEG datasets that ShICA yields more accurate estimation of the components than alternatives.
Miltiadis Kofinas, Naveen Shankar Nagaraja, Efstratios Gavves
tl;dr: Roto-translated local coordinate frames for all nodes-objects in the geometric graphs of interacting dynamical systems
Modelling interactions is critical in learning complex dynamical systems, namely systems of interacting objects with highly non-linear and time-dependent behaviour. A large class of such systems can be formalized as $\textit{geometric graphs}$, $\textit{i.e.}$ graphs with nodes positioned in the Euclidean space given an $\textit{arbitrarily}$ chosen global coordinate system, for instance vehicles in a traffic scene. Notwithstanding the arbitrary global coordinate system, the governing dynamics of the respective dynamical systems are invariant to rotations and translations, also known as $\textit{Galilean invariance}$. As ignoring these invariances leads to worse generalization, in this work we propose local coordinate systems per node-object to induce roto-translation invariance to the geometric graph of the interacting dynamical system. Further, the local coordinate systems allow for a natural definition of anisotropic filtering in graph neural networks. Experiments in traffic scenes, 3D motion capture, and colliding particles demonstrate the proposed approach comfortably outperforms the recent state-of-the-art.
Kaipeng Zhang, Zhenqiang Li, Zhifeng Li, Wei Liu, Yoichi Sato
Recent Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have achieved significant success by stacking multiple convolutional blocks, named procedures in this paper, to extract semantic features. However, they use the same procedure sequence for all inputs, regardless of the intermediate features. This paper proffers a simple yet effective idea of constructing parallel procedures and assigning similar intermediate features to the same specialized procedures in a divide-and-conquer fashion. It relieves each procedure's learning difficulty and thus leads to superior performance. Specifically, we propose a routing-by-memory mechanism for existing CNN architectures. In each stage of the network, we introduce parallel Procedural Units (PUs). A PU consists of a memory head and a procedure. The memory head maintains a summary of a type of features. For an intermediate feature, we search its closest memory and forward it to the corresponding procedure in both training and testing. In this way, different procedures are tailored to different features and therefore tackle them better. Networks with the proposed mechanism can be trained efficiently using a four-step training strategy. Experimental results show that our method improves VGGNet, ResNet, and EfficientNet's accuracies on Tiny ImageNet, ImageNet, and CIFAR-100 benchmarks with a negligible extra computational cost.
Pranjal Awasthi, Natalie Frank, Mehryar Mohri
tl;dr: We prove that in many typical adversarial learning scenarios, there exists a classifier that minimizes the adversarial loss
Adversarial robustness is a critical property in a variety of modern machine learning applications. While it has been the subject of several recent theoretical studies, many important questions related to adversarial robustness are still open. In this work, we study a fundamental question regarding Bayes optimality for adversarial robustness. We provide general sufficient conditions under which the existence of a Bayes optimal classifier can be guaranteed for adversarial robustness. Our results can provide a useful tool for a subsequent study of surrogate losses in adversarial robustness and their consistency properties.
Lin Guan, Mudit Verma, Sihang Guo, Ruohan Zhang, Subbarao Kambhampati
tl;dr: EXPAND is a Context-Aware Data Augmentation technique under the paradigm of HIRL, utilising novel integration of human explanatory feedback with human binary feedback, that has shown to improve on the environment sample & human feedback efficiency.
Human explanation (e.g., in terms of feature importance) has been recently used to extend the communication channel between human and agent in interactive machine learning. Under this setting, human trainers provide not only the ground truth but also some form of explanation. However, this kind of human guidance was only investigated in supervised learning tasks, and it remains unclear how to best incorporate this type of human knowledge into deep reinforcement learning. In this paper, we present the first study of using human visual explanations in human-in-the-loop reinforcement learning (HIRL). We focus on the task of learning from feedback, in which the human trainer not only gives binary evaluative "good" or "bad" feedback for queried state-action pairs, but also provides a visual explanation by annotating relevant features in images. We propose EXPAND (EXPlanation AugmeNted feeDback) to encourage the model to encode task-relevant features through a context-aware data augmentation that only perturbs irrelevant features in human salient information. We choose five tasks, namely Pixel-Taxi and four Atari games, to evaluate the performance and sample efficiency of this approach. We show that our method significantly outperforms methods leveraging human explanation that are adapted from supervised learning, and Human-in-the-loop RL baselines that only utilize evaluative feedback.
Feihu Huang, Xidong Wu, Heng Huang
In the paper, we propose a class of efficient mirror descent ascent methods to solve the nonsmooth nonconvex-strongly-concave minimax problems by using dynamic mirror functions, and introduce a convergence analysis framework to conduct rigorous theoretical analysis for our mirror descent ascent methods. For our stochastic algorithms, we first prove that the mini-batch stochastic mirror descent ascent (SMDA) method obtains a gradient complexity of $O(\kappa^3\epsilon^{-4})$ for finding an $\epsilon$-stationary point, where $\kappa$ denotes the condition number. Further, we propose an accelerated stochastic mirror descent ascent (VR-SMDA) method based on the variance reduced technique. We prove that our VR-SMDA method achieves a lower gradient complexity of $O(\kappa^3\epsilon^{-3})$. For our deterministic algorithm, we prove that our deterministic mirror descent ascent (MDA) achieves a lower gradient complexity of $O(\sqrt{\kappa}\epsilon^{-2})$ under mild conditions, which matches the best known complexity in solving smooth nonconvex-strongly-concave minimax optimization. We conduct the experiments on fair classifier and robust neural network training tasks to demonstrate the efficiency of our new algorithms.
Ziv Goldfeld, Kristjan Greenewald
Mutual information (MI) is a fundamental measure of statistical dependence, with a myriad of applications to information theory, statistics, and machine learning. While it possesses many desirable structural properties, the estimation of high-dimensional MI from samples suffers from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by statistical scalability to high dimensions, this paper proposes sliced MI (SMI) as a surrogate measure of dependence. SMI is defined as an average of MI terms between one-dimensional random projections. We show that it preserves many of the structural properties of classic MI, while gaining scalable computation and efficient estimation from samples. Furthermore, and in contrast to classic MI, SMI can grow as a result of deterministic transformations. This enables leveraging SMI for feature extraction by optimizing it over processing functions of raw data to identify useful representations thereof. Our theory is supported by numerical studies of independence testing and feature extraction, which demonstrate the potential gains SMI offers over classic MI for high-dimensional inference.
Bowen Cheng, Alex Schwing, Alexander Kirillov
tl;dr: Mask classification permits use of the exact same model, loss, and training for both semantic- and instance-level segmentation while achieving state-of-the-art results on semantic segmentation.
Modern approaches typically formulate semantic segmentation as a per-pixel classification task, while instance-level segmentation is handled with an alternative mask classification. Our key insight: mask classification is sufficiently general to solve both semantic- and instance-level segmentation tasks in a unified manner using the exact same model, loss, and training procedure. Following this observation, we propose MaskFormer, a simple mask classification model which predicts a set of binary masks, each associated with a single global class label prediction. Overall, the proposed mask classification-based method simplifies the landscape of effective approaches to semantic and panoptic segmentation tasks and shows excellent empirical results. In particular, we observe that MaskFormer outperforms per-pixel classification baselines when the number of classes is large. Our mask classification-based method outperforms both current state-of-the-art semantic (55.6 mIoU on ADE20K) and panoptic segmentation (52.7 PQ on COCO) models.
Andrew Jesson, Panagiotis Tigas, Joost van Amersfoort, Andreas Kirsch, Uri Shalit, Yarin Gal
Estimating personalized treatment effects from high-dimensional observational data is essential in situations where experimental designs are infeasible, unethical, or expensive. Existing approaches rely on fitting deep models on outcomes observed for treated and control populations. However, when measuring individual outcomes is costly, as is the case of a tumor biopsy, a sample-efficient strategy for acquiring each result is required. Deep Bayesian active learning provides a framework for efficient data acquisition by selecting points with high uncertainty. However, existing methods bias training data acquisition towards regions of non-overlapping support between the treated and control populations. These are not sample-efficient because the treatment effect is not identifiable in such regions. We introduce causal, Bayesian acquisition functions grounded in information theory that bias data acquisition towards regions with overlapping support to maximize sample efficiency for learning personalized treatment effects. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed acquisition strategies on synthetic and semi-synthetic datasets IHDP and CMNIST and their extensions, which aim to simulate common dataset biases and pathologies.
James Henry Bell, Linda Linsefors, Caspar Oesterheld, Joar Max Viktor Skalse
tl;dr: How do value-based reinforcement learning algorithms behave when the environment can predict the agent's policy?
Newcomblike decision problems have been studied extensively in the decision theory literature, but they have so far been largely absent in the reinforcement learning literature. In this paper we study value-based reinforcement learning algorithms in the Newcomblike setting, and answer some of the fundamental theoretical questions about the behaviour of such algorithms in these environments. We show that a value-based reinforcement learning agent cannot converge to a policy that is not \emph{ratifiable}, i.e., does not only choose actions that are optimal given that policy. This gives us a powerful tool for reasoning about the limit behaviour of agents -- for example, it lets us show that there are Newcomblike environments in which a reinforcement learning agent cannot converge to any optimal policy. We show that a ratifiable policy always exists in our setting, but that there are cases in which a reinforcement learning agent normally cannot converge to it (and hence cannot converge at all). We also prove several results about the possible limit behaviours of agents in cases where they do not converge to any policy.
Wanxin Jin, Shaoshuai Mou, George J. Pappas
tl;dr: We propose a Safe Pontryagin Differentiable Programming (Safe PDP) methodology, which establishes a theoretical and algorithmic framework to solve a broad class of safety-critical learning and control tasks.
We propose a Safe Pontryagin Differentiable Programming (Safe PDP) methodology, which establishes a theoretical and algorithmic framework to solve a broad class of safety-critical learning and control tasks---problems that require the guarantee of safety constraint satisfaction at any stage of the learning and control progress. In the spirit of interior-point methods, Safe PDP handles different types of system constraints on states and inputs by incorporating them into the cost or loss through barrier functions. We prove three fundamentals of the proposed Safe PDP: first, both the solution and its gradient in the backward pass can be approximated by solving their more efficient unconstrained counterparts; second, the approximation for both the solution and its gradient can be controlled for arbitrary accuracy by a barrier parameter; and third, importantly, all intermediate results throughout the approximation and optimization strictly respect the constraints, thus guaranteeing safety throughout the entire learning and control process. We demonstrate the capabilities of Safe PDP in solving various safety-critical tasks, including safe policy optimization, safe motion planning, and learning MPCs from demonstrations, on different challenging systems such as 6-DoF maneuvering quadrotor and 6-DoF rocket powered landing.
Tsung-Yen Yang, Michael Hu, Yinlam Chow, Peter Ramadge, Karthik R Narasimhan
tl;dr: We tackle the problem of learning control policies for tasks when provided with constraints in natural language (e.g., safety or budget constraints).
While safe reinforcement learning (RL) holds great promise for many practical applications like robotics or autonomous cars, current approaches require specifying constraints in mathematical form. Such specifications demand domain expertise, limiting the adoption of safe RL. In this paper, we propose learning to interpret natural language constraints for safe RL. To this end, we first introduce HAZARDWORLD, a new multi-task benchmark that requires an agent to optimize reward while not violating constraints specified in free-form text. We then develop an agent with a modular architecture that can interpret and adhere to such textual constraints while learning new tasks. Our model consists of (1) a constraint interpreter that encodes textual constraints into spatial and temporal representations of forbidden states, and (2) a policy network that uses these representations to produce a policy achieving minimal constraint violations during training. Across different domains in HAZARDWORLD, we show that our method achieves higher rewards (up to11x) and fewer constraint violations (by 1.8x) compared to existing approaches. However, in terms of absolute performance, HAZARDWORLD still poses significant challenges for agents to learn efficiently, motivating the need for future work.
Jonas M. Kübler, Simon Buchholz, Bernhard Schölkopf
tl;dr: To harness potential advantages, quantum machine learning models require an inductive bias that cannot be encoded classically.
It has been hypothesized that quantum computers may lend themselves well to applications in machine learning. In the present work, we analyze function classes defined via quantum kernels. Quantum computers offer the possibility to efficiently compute inner products of exponentially large density operators that are classically hard to compute. However, having an exponentially large feature space renders the problem of generalization hard. Furthermore, being able to evaluate inner products in high dimensional spaces efficiently by itself does not guarantee a quantum advantage, as already classically tractable kernels can correspond to high- or infinite-dimensional reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS). We analyze the spectral properties of quantum kernels and find that we can expect an advantage if their RKHS is low dimensional and contains functions that are hard to compute classically. If the target function is known to lie in this class, this implies a quantum advantage, as the quantum computer can encode this inductive bias, whereas there is no classically efficient way to constrain the function class in the same way. However, we show that finding suitable quantum kernels is not easy because the kernel evaluation might require exponentially many measurements. In conclusion, our message is a somewhat sobering one: we conjecture that quantum machine learning models can offer speed-ups only if we manage to encode knowledge about the problem at hand into quantum circuits, while encoding the same bias into a classical model would be hard. These situations may plausibly occur when learning on data generated by a quantum process, however, they appear to be harder to come by for classical datasets.
Irene Solaiman, Christy Dennison
tl;dr: Small, hand-curated fine-tuning datasets can significantly change language model behavior
Language models can generate harmful and biased outputs and exhibit undesirable behavior according to a given cultural context. We propose a Process for Adapting Language Models to Society (PALMS) with Values-Targeted Datasets, an iterative process to significantly change model behavior by crafting and fine-tuning on a dataset that reflects a predetermined set of target values. We evaluate our process using three metrics: quantitative metrics with human evaluations that score output adherence to a target value, toxicity scoring on outputs; and qualitative metrics analyzing the most common word associated with a given social category. Through each iteration, we add additional training dataset examples based on observed shortcomings from evaluations. PALMS performs significantly better on all metrics compared to baseline and control models for a broad range of GPT-3 language model sizes without compromising capability integrity. We find that the effectiveness of PALMS increases with model size. We show that significantly adjusting language model behavior is feasible with a small, hand-curated dataset.
Yong Liu
tl;dr: In this paper, we study the statistical properties of kernel $k$-means and Nystr\"{o}m-based kernel $k$-means, and obtain optimal clustering risk bounds, which improves on the existing risk bounds.
Kernel $k$-means is one of the most popular approaches to clustering and its theoretical properties have been investigated for decades. However, the existing state-of-the-art risk bounds are of order $\mathcal{O}(k/\sqrt{n})$, which do not match with the stated lower bound $\Omega(\sqrt{k/n})$ in terms of $k$, where $k$ is the number of clusters and $n$ is the size of the training set. In this paper, we study the statistical properties of kernel $k$-means and Nystr\"{o}m-based kernel $k$-means, and obtain optimal clustering risk bounds, which improve the existing risk bounds. Particularly, based on a refined upper bound of Rademacher complexity [21], we first derive an optimal risk bound of rate $\mathcal{O}(\sqrt{k/n})$ for empirical risk minimizer (ERM), and further extend it to general cases beyond ERM. Then, we analyze the statistical effect of computational approximations of Nystr\"{o}m kernel $k$-means, and prove that it achieves the same statistical accuracy as the original kernel $k$-means considering only $\Omega(\sqrt{nk})$ Nystr\"{o}m landmark points. We further relax the restriction of landmark points from $\Omega(\sqrt{nk})$ to $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ under a mild condition. Finally, we validate the theoretical findings via numerical experiments.
Risheng Liu, Yaohua Liu, Shangzhi Zeng, Jin Zhang
In recent years, Bi-Level Optimization (BLO) techniques have received extensive attentions from both learning and vision communities. A variety of BLO models in complex and practical tasks are of non-convex follower structure in nature (a.k.a., without Lower-Level Convexity, LLC for short). However, this challenging class of BLOs is lack of developments on both efficient solution strategies and solid theoretical guarantees. In this work, we propose a new algorithmic framework, named Initialization Auxiliary and Pessimistic Trajectory Truncated Gradient Method (IAPTT-GM), to partially address the above issues. In particular, by introducing an auxiliary as initialization to guide the optimization dynamics and designing a pessimistic trajectory truncation operation, we construct a reliable approximate version of the original BLO in the absence of LLC hypothesis. Our theoretical investigations establish the convergence of solutions returned by IAPTT-GM towards those of the original BLO without LLC. As an additional bonus, we also theoretically justify the quality of our IAPTT-GM embedded with Nesterov's accelerated dynamics under LLC. The experimental results confirm both the convergence of our algorithm without LLC, and the theoretical findings under LLC.
Aditya Gangrade, Anil Kag, Ashok Cutkosky, Venkatesh Saligrama
Motivated by applications to resource-limited and safety-critical domains, we study selective classification in the online learning model, wherein a predictor may abstain from classifying an instance. For example, this may model an adaptive decision to invoke more resources on this instance. Two salient aspects of the setting we consider are that the data may be non-realisable, due to which abstention may be a valid long-term action, and that feedback is only received when the learner abstains, which models the fact that reliable labels are only available when the resource intensive processing is invoked. Within this framework, we explore strategies that make few mistakes, while not abstaining too many times more than the best-in-hindsight error-free classifier from a given class. That is, the one that makes no mistakes, while abstaining the fewest number of times. We construct simple versioning-based schemes for any $\mu \in (0,1],$ that make most $T^\mu$ mistakes while incurring $\tilde{O}(T^{1-\mu})$ excess abstention against adaptive adversaries. We further show that this dependence on $T$ is tight, and provide illustrative experiments on realistic datasets.
Qianli Xu, Fen Fang, Ana Garcia del Molino, Vigneshwaran Subbaraju, Joo Hwee Lim
tl;dr: A new dataset and baseline model for predicting event memorability from visual information and its context
Episodic event memory is a key component of human cognition. Predicting event memorability,i.e., to what extent an event is recalled, is a tough challenge in memory research and has profound implications for artificial intelligence. In this study, we investigate factors that affect event memorability according to a cued recall process. Specifically, we explore whether event memorability is contingent on the event context, as well as the intrinsic visual attributes of image cues. We design a novel experiment protocol and conduct a large-scale experiment with 47 elder subjects over 3 months. Subjects’ memory of life events is tested in a cued recall process. Using advanced visual analytics methods, we build a first-of-its-kind event memorability dataset (called R3) with rich information about event context and visual semantic features. Furthermore, we propose a contextual event memory network (CEMNet) that tackles multi-modal input to predict item-wise event memorability, which outperforms competitive benchmarks. The findings inform deeper understanding of episodic event memory, and open up a new avenue for prediction of human episodic memory. Source code is available at https://github.com/ffzzy840304/Predicting-Event-Memorability.
Ke Sun, Yafei Wang, Yi Liu, Yingnan Zhao, Bo Pan, SHANGLING JUI, Bei Jiang, Linglong Kong
Anderson mixing has been heuristically applied to reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms for accelerating convergence and improving the sampling efficiency of deep RL. Despite its heuristic improvement of convergence, a rigorous mathematical justification for the benefits of Anderson mixing in RL has not yet been put forward. In this paper, we provide deeper insights into a class of acceleration schemes built on Anderson mixing that improve the convergence of deep RL algorithms. Our main results establish a connection between Anderson mixing and quasi-Newton methods and prove that Anderson mixing increases the convergence radius of policy iteration schemes by an extra contraction factor. The key focus of the analysis roots in the fixed-point iteration nature of RL. We further propose a stabilization strategy by introducing a stable regularization term in Anderson mixing and a differentiable, non-expansive MellowMax operator that can allow both faster convergence and more stable behavior. Extensive experiments demonstrate that our proposed method enhances the convergence, stability, and performance of RL algorithms.
Soumyabrata Pal, Arya Mazumdar, Venkata Gandikota
tl;dr: We provide algorithms for support recovery of sparse vectors from a mixture of noisy linear and 1-bit measurements
Recovery of support of a sparse vector from simple measurements is a widely studied problem, considered under the frameworks of compressed sensing, 1-bit compressed sensing, and more general single index models. We consider generalizations of this problem: mixtures of linear regressions, and mixtures of linear classifiers, where the goal is to recover supports of multiple sparse vectors using only a small number of possibly noisy linear, and 1-bit measurements respectively. The key challenge is that the measurements from different vectors are randomly mixed. Both of these problems have also received attention recently. In mixtures of linear classifiers, an observation corresponds to the side of the queried hyperplane a random unknown vector lies in; whereas in mixtures of linear regressions we observe the projection of a random unknown vector on the queried hyperplane. The primary step in recovering the unknown vectors from the mixture is to first identify the support of all the individual component vectors. In this work, we study the number of measurements sufficient for recovering the supports of all the component vectors in a mixture in both these models. We provide algorithms that use a number of measurements polynomial in $k, \log n$ and quasi-polynomial in $\ell$, to recover the support of all the $\ell$ unknown vectors in the mixture with high probability when each individual component is a $k$-sparse $n$-dimensional vector.
Hong Liu, Jianmin Wang, Mingsheng Long
tl;dr: We propose Cycle Self-Training with Tsallis entropy to improve standard self-training in domain adaptation. Theoretical analysis and empirical study show the advantage of our method.
Mainstream approaches for unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA) learn domain-invariant representations to narrow the domain shift, which are empirically effective but theoretically challenged by the hardness or impossibility theorems. Recently, self-training has been gaining momentum in UDA, which exploits unlabeled target data by training with target pseudo-labels. However, as corroborated in this work, under distributional shift, the pseudo-labels can be unreliable in terms of their large discrepancy from target ground truth. In this paper, we propose Cycle Self-Training (CST), a principled self-training algorithm that explicitly enforces pseudo-labels to generalize across domains. CST cycles between a forward step and a reverse step until convergence. In the forward step, CST generates target pseudo-labels with a source-trained classifier. In the reverse step, CST trains a target classifier using target pseudo-labels, and then updates the shared representations to make the target classifier perform well on the source data. We introduce the Tsallis entropy as a confidence-friendly regularization to improve the quality of target pseudo-labels. We analyze CST theoretically under realistic assumptions, and provide hard cases where CST recovers target ground truth, while both invariant feature learning and vanilla self-training fail. Empirical results indicate that CST significantly improves over the state-of-the-arts on visual recognition and sentiment analysis benchmarks.
Ziwei Ji, Justin D. Li, Matus Telgarsky
tl;dr: For general classification problems, including those with noise, gradient descent with early stopping on shallow ReLU networks achieves the optimal risk amongst all measurable predictors
This work studies the behavior of shallow ReLU networks trained with the logistic loss via gradient descent on binary classification data where the underlying data distribution is general, and the (optimal) Bayes risk is not necessarily zero. In this setting, it is shown that gradient descent with early stopping achieves population risk arbitrarily close to optimal in terms of not just logistic and misclassification losses, but also in terms of calibration, meaning the sigmoid mapping of its outputs approximates the true underlying conditional distribution arbitrarily finely. Moreover, the necessary iteration, sample, and architectural complexities of this analysis all scale naturally with a certain complexity measure of the true conditional model. Lastly, while it is not shown that early stopping is necessary, it is shown that any classifier satisfying a basic local interpolation property is inconsistent.
Ruoxi Sun, Hanjun Dai, Li Li, Steven Kearnes, Bo Dai
tl;dr: We explore various EBM designs for retrosynthesis, and show some designs outperform the state of the art.
Retrosynthesis is the process of identifying a set of reactants to synthesize a target molecule. It is of vital importance to material design and drug discovery. Existing machine learning approaches based on language models and graph neural networks have achieved encouraging results. However, the inner connections of these models are rarely discussed, and rigorous evaluations of these models are largely in need. In this paper, we propose a framework that unifies sequence- and graph-based methods as energy-based models (EBMs) with different energy functions. This unified view establishes connections and reveals the differences between models, thereby enhancing our understanding of model design. We also provide a comprehensive assessment of performance to the community. Moreover, we present a novel dual variant within the framework that performs consistent training to induce the agreement between forward- and backward-prediction. This model improves the state-of-the-art of template-free methods with or without reaction types.
Yuan Cao, Quanquan Gu, Misha Belkin
Modern machine learning systems such as deep neural networks are often highly over-parameterized so that they can fit the noisy training data exactly, yet they can still achieve small test errors in practice. In this paper, we study this "benign overfitting" phenomenon of the maximum margin classifier for linear classification problems. Specifically, we consider data generated from sub-Gaussian mixtures, and provide a tight risk bound for the maximum margin linear classifier in the over-parameterized setting. Our results precisely characterize the condition under which benign overfitting can occur in linear classification problems, and improve on previous work. They also have direct implications for over-parameterized logistic regression.
Zhongzheng Ren, Xiaoming Zhao, Alex Schwing
tl;dr: We introduce REDO, a class-agnostic framework to reconstruct the dynamic objects from videos
We introduce REDO, a class-agnostic framework to REconstruct the Dynamic Objects from RGBD or calibrated videos. Compared to prior work, our problem setting is more realistic yet more challenging for three reasons: 1) due to occlusion or camera settings an object of interest may never be entirely visible, but we aim to reconstruct the complete shape; 2) we aim to handle different object dynamics including rigid motion, non-rigid motion, and articulation; 3) we aim to reconstruct different categories of objects with one unified framework. To address these challenges, we develop two novel modules. First, we introduce a canonical 4D implicit function which is pixel-aligned with aggregated temporal visual cues. Second, we develop a 4D transformation module which captures object dynamics to support temporal propagation and aggregation. We study the efficacy of REDO in extensive experiments on synthetic RGBD video datasets SAIL-VOS 3D and DeformingThings4D++, and on real-world video data 3DPW. We find REDO outperforms state-of-the-art dynamic reconstruction methods by a margin. In ablation studies we validate each developed component.
Taiji Suzuki, Atsushi Nitanda
Deep learning has exhibited superior performance for various tasks, especially for high-dimensional datasets, such as images. To understand this property, we investigate the approximation and estimation ability of deep learning on {\it anisotropic Besov spaces}. The anisotropic Besov space is characterized by direction-dependent smoothness and includes several function classes that have been investigated thus far. We demonstrate that the approximation error and estimation error of deep learning only depend on the average value of the smoothness parameters in all directions. Consequently, the curse of dimensionality can be avoided if the smoothness of the target function is highly anisotropic. Unlike existing studies, our analysis does not require a low-dimensional structure of the input data. We also investigate the minimax optimality of deep learning and compare its performance with that of the kernel method (more generally, linear estimators). The results show that deep learning has better dependence on the input dimensionality if the target function possesses anisotropic smoothness, and it achieves an adaptive rate for functions with spatially inhomogeneous smoothness.
Yi-Shan Wu, Andres R Masegosa, Stephan Sloth Lorenzen, Christian Igel, Yevgeny Seldin
We present a new second-order oracle bound for the expected risk of a weighted majority vote. The bound is based on a novel parametric form of the Chebyshev-Cantelli inequality (a.k.a. one-sided Chebyshev’s), which is amenable to efficient minimization. The new form resolves the optimization challenge faced by prior oracle bounds based on the Chebyshev-Cantelli inequality, the C-bounds [Germain et al., 2015], and, at the same time, it improves on the oracle bound based on second order Markov’s inequality introduced by Masegosa et al. [2020]. We also derive a new concentration of measure inequality, which we name PAC-Bayes-Bennett, since it combines PAC-Bayesian bounding with Bennett’s inequality. We use it for empirical estimation of the oracle bound. The PAC-Bayes-Bennett inequality improves on the PAC-Bayes-Bernstein inequality of Seldin et al. [2012]. We provide an empirical evaluation demonstrating that the new bounds can improve on the work of Masegosa et al. [2020]. Both the parametric form of the Chebyshev-Cantelli inequality and the PAC-Bayes-Bennett inequality may be of independent interest for the study of concentration of measure in other domains.
Grigorios Chrysos, Markos Georgopoulos, Yannis Panagakis
tl;dr: We condition the generator of a genertive model using a polynomial expansion
Generative modeling has evolved to a notable field of machine learning. Deep polynomial neural networks (PNNs) have demonstrated impressive results in unsupervised image generation, where the task is to map an input vector (i.e., noise) to a synthesized image. However, the success of PNNs has not been replicated in conditional generation tasks, such as super-resolution. Existing PNNs focus on single-variable polynomial expansions which do not fare well to two-variable inputs, i.e., the noise variable and the conditional variable. In this work, we introduce a general framework, called CoPE, that enables a polynomial expansion of two input variables and captures their auto- and cross-correlations. We exhibit how CoPE can be trivially augmented to accept an arbitrary number of input variables. CoPE is evaluated in five tasks (class-conditional generation, inverse problems, edges-to-image translation, image-to-image translation, attribute-guided generation) involving eight datasets. The thorough evaluation suggests that CoPE can be useful for tackling diverse conditional generation tasks. The source code of CoPE is available at https://github.com/grigorisg9gr/polynomial_nets_for_conditional_generation.
Maria Tsimpoukelli, Jacob Menick, Serkan Cabi, S. M. Ali Eslami, Oriol Vinyals, Felix Hill
tl;dr: We present a simple approach for transferring abilities of a frozen language model to a multi-modal setting (vision and language).
When trained at sufficient scale, auto-regressive language models exhibit the notable ability to learn a new language task after being prompted with just a few examples. Here, we present a simple, yet effective, approach for transferring this few-shot learning ability to a multimodal setting (vision and language). Using aligned image and caption data, we train a vision encoder to represent each image as a sequence of continuous embeddings, such that a pre-trained, frozen language model presented with this prefix generates the appropriate caption. The resulting system is a multimodal few-shot learner, with the surprising ability to learn a variety of new tasks when conditioned on examples, represented as a sequence of any number of interleaved image and text embeddings. We demonstrate that it can rapidly learn words for new objects and novel visual categories, do visual question-answering with only a handful of examples, and make use of outside knowledge, by measuring a single model on a variety of established and new benchmarks.
Christopher Hoang, Sungryull Sohn, Jongwook Choi, Wilka Torrico Carvalho, Honglak Lee
tl;dr: Graph-based planning framework exploiting successor features to achieve long-horizon goal-conditioned RL
Operating in the real-world often requires agents to learn about a complex environment and apply this understanding to achieve a breadth of goals. This problem, known as goal-conditioned reinforcement learning (GCRL), becomes especially challenging for long-horizon goals. Current methods have tackled this problem by augmenting goal-conditioned policies with graph-based planning algorithms. However, they struggle to scale to large, high-dimensional state spaces and assume access to exploration mechanisms for efficiently collecting training data. In this work, we introduce Successor Feature Landmarks (SFL), a framework for exploring large, high-dimensional environments so as to obtain a policy that is proficient for any goal. SFL leverages the ability of successor features (SF) to capture transition dynamics, using it to drive exploration by estimating state-novelty and to enable high-level planning by abstracting the state-space as a non-parametric landmark-based graph. We further exploit SF to directly compute a goal-conditioned policy for inter-landmark traversal, which we use to execute plans to "frontier" landmarks at the edge of the explored state space. We show in our experiments on MiniGrid and ViZDoom that SFL enables efficient exploration of large, high-dimensional state spaces and outperforms state-of-the-art baselines on long-horizon GCRL tasks.
Brandon Carter, Siddhartha Jain, Jonas Mueller, David Gifford
tl;dr: We demonstrate that neural networks trained on CIFAR-10 and ImageNet overinterpret their inputs and rely upon semantically meaningless features present in unmodified input pixels.
Image classifiers are typically scored on their test set accuracy, but high accuracy can mask a subtle type of model failure. We find that high scoring convolutional neural networks (CNNs) on popular benchmarks exhibit troubling pathologies that allow them to display high accuracy even in the absence of semantically salient features. When a model provides a high-confidence decision without salient supporting input features, we say the classifier has overinterpreted its input, finding too much class-evidence in patterns that appear nonsensical to humans. Here, we demonstrate that neural networks trained on CIFAR-10 and ImageNet suffer from overinterpretation, and we find models on CIFAR-10 make confident predictions even when 95% of input images are masked and humans cannot discern salient features in the remaining pixel-subsets. We introduce Batched Gradient SIS, a new method for discovering sufficient input subsets for complex datasets, and use this method to show the sufficiency of border pixels in ImageNet for training and testing. Although these patterns portend potential model fragility in real-world deployment, they are in fact valid statistical patterns of the benchmark that alone suffice to attain high test accuracy. Unlike adversarial examples, overinterpretation relies upon unmodified image pixels. We find ensembling and input dropout can each help mitigate overinterpretation.
Dongkuan Xu, Wei Cheng, Dongsheng Luo, Haifeng Chen, Xiang Zhang
tl;dr: We study how graph information is transformed and transferred during the contrastive learning process, and propose an information-aware graph contrastive learning framework called InfoGCL.
Various graph contrastive learning models have been proposed to improve the performance of tasks on graph datasets in recent years. While effective and prevalent, these models are usually carefully customized. In particular, despite all recent work create two contrastive views, they differ in a variety of view augmentations, architectures, and objectives. It remains an open question how to build your graph contrastive learning model from scratch for particular graph tasks and datasets. In this work, we aim to fill this gap by studying how graph information is transformed and transferred during the contrastive learning process, and proposing an information-aware graph contrastive learning framework called InfoGCL. The key to the success of the proposed framework is to follow the Information Bottleneck principle to reduce the mutual information between contrastive parts while keeping task-relevant information intact at both the levels of the individual module and the entire framework so that the information loss during graph representation learning can be minimized. We show for the first time that all recent graph contrastive learning methods can be unified by our framework. Based on theoretical and empirical analysis on benchmark graph datasets, we show that InfoGCL achieves state-of-the-art performance in the settings of both graph classification and node classification tasks.
Hadi Daneshmand, Amir Joudaki, Francis Bach
tl;dr: We prove that successive batch normalizations, together with random linear layers, incrementally orthogonalize representations of samples.
This paper underlines an elegant property of batch-normalization (BN): Successive batch normalizations with random linear updates make samples increasingly orthogonal. We establish a non-asymptotic characterization of the interplay between depth, width, and the orthogonality of deep representations. More precisely, we prove, under a mild assumption, the deviation of the representations from orthogonality rapidly decays with depth up to a term inversely proportional to the network width. This result has two main theoretical and practical implications: 1) Theoretically, as the depth grows, the distribution of the outputs contracts to a Wasserstein-2 ball around an isotropic normal distribution. Furthermore, the radius of this Wasserstein ball shrinks with the width of the network. 2) Practically, the orthogonality of the representations directly influences the performance of stochastic gradient descent (SGD). When representations are initially aligned, we observe SGD wastes many iterations to disentangle representations before the classification. Nevertheless, we experimentally show that starting optimization from orthogonal representations is sufficient to accelerate SGD, with no need for BN.
Calvin Tsay, Jan Kronqvist, Alexander Thebelt, Ruth Misener
This paper introduces a class of mixed-integer formulations for trained ReLU neural networks. The approach balances model size and tightness by partitioning node inputs into a number of groups and forming the convex hull over the partitions via disjunctive programming. At one extreme, one partition per input recovers the convex hull of a node, i.e., the tightest possible formulation for each node. For fewer partitions, we develop smaller relaxations that approximate the convex hull, and show that they outperform existing formulations. Specifically, we propose strategies for partitioning variables based on theoretical motivations and validate these strategies using extensive computational experiments. Furthermore, the proposed scheme complements known algorithmic approaches, e.g., optimization-based bound tightening captures dependencies within a partition.
Yuxin Fang, Bencheng Liao, Xinggang Wang, Jiemin Fang, Jiyang Qi, Rui Wu, Jianwei Niu, Wenyu Liu
tl;dr: We study the transferability of the vanilla ViT pre-trained on mid-sized ImageNet-1k to the more challenging COCO object detection benchmark.
Can Transformer perform $2\mathrm{D}$ object- and region-level recognition from a pure sequence-to-sequence perspective with minimal knowledge about the $2\mathrm{D}$ spatial structure? To answer this question, we present You Only Look at One Sequence (YOLOS), a series of object detection models based on the vanilla Vision Transformer with the fewest possible modifications, region priors, as well as inductive biases of the target task. We find that YOLOS pre-trained on the mid-sized ImageNet-$1k$ dataset only can already achieve quite competitive performance on the challenging COCO object detection benchmark, e.g., YOLOS-Base directly adopted from BERT-Base architecture can obtain $42.0$ box AP on COCO val. We also discuss the impacts as well as limitations of current pre-train schemes and model scaling strategies for Transformer in vision through YOLOS. Code and pre-trained models are available at https://github.com/hustvl/YOLOS.
Christian Kümmerle, Claudio Mayrink Verdun, Dominik Stöger
tl;dr: We show that IRLS for basis pursuit achieves linear convergence starting from any initialization, whereas previous results only provided a local linear convergence rate.
The recovery of sparse data is at the core of many applications in machine learning and signal processing. While such problems can be tackled using $\ell_1$-regularization as in the LASSO estimator and in the Basis Pursuit approach, specialized algorithms are typically required to solve the corresponding high-dimensional non-smooth optimization for large instances. Iteratively Reweighted Least Squares (IRLS) is a widely used algorithm for this purpose due to its excellent numerical performance. However, while existing theory is able to guarantee convergence of this algorithm to the minimizer, it does not provide a global convergence rate. In this paper, we prove that a variant of IRLS converges \emph{with a global linear rate} to a sparse solution, i.e., with a linear error decrease occurring immediately from any initialization if the measurements fulfill the usual null space property assumption. We support our theory by numerical experiments showing that our linear rate captures the correct dimension dependence. We anticipate that our theoretical findings will lead to new insights for many other use cases of the IRLS algorithm, such as in low-rank matrix recovery.
Mingguo He, Zhewei Wei, Zengfeng Huang, Hongteng Xu
tl;dr: We propose BernNet, a graph neural network that designs and learns an arbitrary spectral filter via Bernstein polynomial approximation.
Many representative graph neural networks, $e.g.$, GPR-GNN and ChebNet, approximate graph convolutions with graph spectral filters. However, existing work either applies predefined filter weights or learns them without necessary constraints, which may lead to oversimplified or ill-posed filters. To overcome these issues, we propose $\textit{BernNet}$, a novel graph neural network with theoretical support that provides a simple but effective scheme for designing and learning arbitrary graph spectral filters. In particular, for any filter over the normalized Laplacian spectrum of a graph, our BernNet estimates it by an order-$K$ Bernstein polynomial approximation and designs its spectral property by setting the coefficients of the Bernstein basis. Moreover, we can learn the coefficients (and the corresponding filter weights) based on observed graphs and their associated signals and thus achieve the BernNet specialized for the data. Our experiments demonstrate that BernNet can learn arbitrary spectral filters, including complicated band-rejection and comb filters, and it achieves superior performance in real-world graph modeling tasks. Code is available at https://github.com/ivam-he/BernNet.
Grzegorz Gluch, rudiger urbanke
tl;dr: We show that some version of adversarial training provably improves generalization error over standard training.
We prove an exponential separation for the sample/query complexity between the standard PAC-learning model and a version of the Equivalence-Query-learning model. In the PAC model all samples are provided at the beginning of the learning process. In the Equivalence-Query model the samples are acquired through an interaction between a teacher and a learner, where the teacher provides counterexamples to hypotheses given by the learner. It is intuitive that in an interactive setting fewer samples are needed. We make this formal and prove that in order to achieve an error $\epsilon$ {\em exponentially} (in $\epsilon$) fewer samples suffice than what the PAC bound requires. It was shown experimentally by Stutz, Hein, and Schiele that adversarial training with on-manifold adversarial examples aids generalization (compared to standard training). If we think of the adversarial examples as counterexamples to the current hypothesis then our result can be thought of as a theoretical confirmation of those findings. We also discuss how our result relates to adversarial robustness. In the standard adversarial model one restricts the adversary by introducing a norm constraint. An alternative was pioneered by Goldwasser et. al. Rather than restricting the adversary the learner is enhanced. We pursue a third path. We require the adversary to return samples according to the Equivalance-Query model and show that this leads to robustness. Even though our model has its limitations it provides a fresh point of view on adversarial robustness.
Sebastien Arnold, Guneet Singh Dhillon, Avinash Ravichandran, Stefano Soatto
tl;dr: How should we sample episodes to improve generalization? Our empirical study suggests that sampling uniformly over episode difficulty outperforms curriculum learning, easy, and hard mining.
Episodic training is a core ingredient of few-shot learning to train models on tasks with limited labelled data. Despite its success, episodic training remains largely understudied, prompting us to ask the question: what is the best way to sample episodes? In this paper, we first propose a method to approximate episode sampling distributions based on their difficulty. Building on this method, we perform an extensive analysis and find that sampling uniformly over episode difficulty outperforms other sampling schemes, including curriculum and easy-/hard-mining. As the proposed sampling method is algorithm agnostic, we can leverage these insights to improve few-shot learning accuracies across many episodic training algorithms. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method across popular few-shot learning datasets, algorithms, network architectures, and protocols.
Tim G. J. Rudner, Vitchyr H. Pong, Rowan Thomas McAllister, Yarin Gal, Sergey Levine
tl;dr: This paper presents a new probabilistic inference method for goal-directed off-policy reinforcement learning.
While reinforcement learning algorithms provide automated acquisition of optimal policies, practical application of such methods requires a number of design decisions, such as manually designing reward functions that not only define the task, but also provide sufficient shaping to accomplish it. In this paper, we view reinforcement learning as inferring policies that achieve desired outcomes, rather than as a problem of maximizing rewards. To solve this inference problem, we establish a novel variational inference formulation that allows us to derive a well-shaped reward function which can be learned directly from environment interactions. From the corresponding variational objective, we also derive a new probabilistic Bellman backup operator and use it to develop an off-policy algorithm to solve goal-directed tasks. We empirically demonstrate that this method eliminates the need to hand-craft reward functions for a suite of diverse manipulation and locomotion tasks and leads to effective goal-directed behaviors.
HaiYing Wang, Aonan Zhang, Chong Wang
We investigate the issue of parameter estimation with nonuniform negative sampling for imbalanced data. We first prove that, with imbalanced data, the available information about unknown parameters is only tied to the relatively small number of positive instances, which justifies the usage of negative sampling. However, if the negative instances are subsampled to the same level of the positive cases, there is information loss. To maintain more information, we derive the asymptotic distribution of a general inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator and obtain the optimal sampling probability that minimizes its variance. To further improve the estimation efficiency over the IPW method, we propose a likelihood-based estimator by correcting log odds for the sampled data and prove that the improved estimator has the smallest asymptotic variance among a large class of estimators. It is also more robust to pilot misspecification. We validate our approach on simulated data as well as a real click-through rate dataset with more than 0.3 trillion instances, collected over a period of a month. Both theoretical and empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.
Teodor Vanislavov Marinov, Julian Zimmert
tl;dr: We present a Pareto frontier of up to logarithmic factors for the Contextual Bandit model selection problem.
Recent progress in model selection raises the question of the fundamental limits of these techniques. Under specific scrutiny has been model selection for general contextual bandits with nested policy classes, resulting in a COLT2020 open problem. It asks whether it is possible to obtain simultaneously the optimal single algorithm guarantees over all policies in a nested sequence of policy classes, or if otherwise this is possible for a trade-off $\alpha\in[\frac{1}{2},1)$ between complexity term and time: $\ln(|\Pi_m|)^{1-\alpha}T^\alpha$. We give a disappointing answer to this question. Even in the purely stochastic regime, the desired results are unobtainable. We present a Pareto frontier of up to logarithmic factors matching upper and lower bounds, thereby proving that an increase in the complexity term $\ln(|\Pi_m|)$ independent of $T$ is unavoidable for general policy classes. As a side result, we also resolve a COLT2016 open problem concerning second-order bounds in full-information games.
Shashi Kant Gupta, Mengmi Zhang, Chia-Chien Wu, Jeremy M. Wolfe, Gabriel Kreiman
tl;dr: Deep nets and humans share similar inherent biases in visual search asymmetry
Visual search is a ubiquitous and often challenging daily task, exemplified by looking for the car keys at home or a friend in a crowd. An intriguing property of some classical search tasks is an asymmetry such that finding a target A among distractors B can be easier than finding B among A. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for asymmetry in visual search, we propose a computational model that takes a target and a search image as inputs and produces a sequence of eye movements until the target is found. The model integrates eccentricity-dependent visual recognition with target-dependent top-down cues. We compared the model against human behavior in six paradigmatic search tasks that show asymmetry in humans. Without prior exposure to the stimuli or task-specific training, the model provides a plausible mechanism for search asymmetry. We hypothesized that the polarity of search asymmetry arises from experience with the natural environment. We tested this hypothesis by training the model on augmented versions of ImageNet where the biases of natural images were either removed or reversed. The polarity of search asymmetry disappeared or was altered depending on the training protocol. This study highlights how classical perceptual properties can emerge in neural network models, without the need for task-specific training, but rather as a consequence of the statistical properties of the developmental diet fed to the model. All source code and data are publicly available at https://github.com/kreimanlab/VisualSearchAsymmetry.
Luigi Gresele, Julius Von Kügelgen, Vincent Stimper, Bernhard Schölkopf, Michel Besserve
tl;dr: We introduce independent mechanism analysis, a novel approach to nonlinear blind source separation inspired by the concept of independent causal mechanisms.
Independent component analysis provides a principled framework for unsupervised representation learning, with solid theory on the identifiability of the latent code that generated the data, given only observations of mixtures thereof. Unfortunately, when the mixing is nonlinear, the model is provably nonidentifiable, since statistical independence alone does not sufficiently constrain the problem. Identifiability can be recovered in settings where additional, typically observed variables are included in the generative process. We investigate an alternative path and consider instead including assumptions reflecting the principle of independent causal mechanisms exploited in the field of causality. Specifically, our approach is motivated by thinking of each source as independently influencing the mixing process. This gives rise to a framework which we term independent mechanism analysis. We provide theoretical and empirical evidence that our approach circumvents a number of nonidentifiability issues arising in nonlinear blind source separation.
Tam Le, Truyen Nguyen, Makoto Yamada, Jose Blanchet, Viet Anh Nguyen
tl;dr: Adversarial Regression with Doubly Non-negative Weighting Matrices
Many machine learning tasks that involve predicting an output response can be solved by training a weighted regression model. Unfortunately, the predictive power of this type of models may severely deteriorate under low sample sizes or under covariate perturbations. Reweighting the training samples has aroused as an effective mitigation strategy to these problems. In this paper, we propose a novel and coherent scheme for kernel-reweighted regression by reparametrizing the sample weights using a doubly non-negative matrix. When the weighting matrix is confined in an uncertainty set using either the log-determinant divergence or the Bures-Wasserstein distance, we show that the adversarially reweighted estimate can be solved efficiently using first-order methods. Numerical experiments show that our reweighting strategy delivers promising results on numerous datasets.
QIYU KANG, Yang Song, Qinxu Ding, Wee Peng Tay
Deep neural networks (DNNs) are well-known to be vulnerable to adversarial attacks, where malicious human-imperceptible perturbations are included in the input to the deep network to fool it into making a wrong classification. Recent studies have demonstrated that neural Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) are intrinsically more robust against adversarial attacks compared to vanilla DNNs. In this work, we propose a neural ODE with Lyapunov-stable equilibrium points for defending against adversarial attacks (SODEF). By ensuring that the equilibrium points of the ODE solution used as part of SODEF are Lyapunov-stable, the ODE solution for an input with a small perturbation converges to the same solution as the unperturbed input. We provide theoretical results that give insights into the stability of SODEF as well as the choice of regularizers to ensure its stability. Our analysis suggests that our proposed regularizers force the extracted feature points to be within a neighborhood of the Lyapunov-stable equilibrium points of the SODEF ODE. SODEF is compatible with many defense methods and can be applied to any neural network's final regressor layer to enhance its stability against adversarial attacks.
Jin Xu, Hyunjik Kim, Tom Rainforth, Yee Whye Teh
tl;dr: We propose group equivariant subsampling with applications to equivariant representation learning of objects.
Subsampling is used in convolutional neural networks (CNNs) in the form of pooling or strided convolutions, to reduce the spatial dimensions of feature maps and to allow the receptive fields to grow exponentially with depth. However, it is known that such subsampling operations are not translation equivariant, unlike convolutions that are translation equivariant. Here, we first introduce translation equivariant subsampling/upsampling layers that can be used to construct exact translation equivariant CNNs. We then generalise these layers beyond translations to general groups, thus proposing group equivariant subsampling/upsampling. We use these layers to construct group equivariant autoencoders (GAEs) that allow us to learn low-dimensional equivariant representations. We empirically verify on images that the representations are indeed equivariant to input translations and rotations, and thus generalise well to unseen positions and orientations. We further use GAEs in models that learn object-centric representations on multi-object datasets, and show improved data efficiency and decomposition compared to non-equivariant baselines.
Jiachen Sun, Yulong Cao, Christopher Choy, Zhiding Yu, Anima Anandkumar, Zhuoqing Mao, Chaowei Xiao
tl;dr: In this paper, we demonstrate that appropriate self-supervisions in adversarial training can significantly enhance the robustness in 3D point cloud recognition.
3D point cloud data is increasingly used in safety-critical applications such as autonomous driving. Thus, the robustness of 3D deep learning models against adversarial attacks becomes a major consideration. In this paper, we systematically study the impact of various self-supervised learning proxy tasks on different architectures and threat models for 3D point clouds with adversarial training. Specifically, we study MLP-based (PointNet), convolution-based (DGCNN), and transformer-based (PCT) 3D architectures. Through extensive experimentation, we demonstrate that appropriate applications of self-supervision can significantly enhance the robustness in 3D point cloud recognition, achieving considerable improvements compared to the standard adversarial training baseline. Our analysis reveals that local feature learning is desirable for adversarial robustness in point clouds since it limits the adversarial propagation between the point-level input perturbations and the model's final output. This insight also explains the success of DGCNN and the jigsaw proxy task in achieving stronger 3D adversarial robustness.
Cristopher Salvi, Maud Lemercier, Chong Liu, Blanka Horvath, Theo Damoulas, Terry Lyons
tl;dr: By conditioning stochastic processes on their natural filtrations, we introduce the notion of higher order kernel mean embeddings and propose empirical estimators for the associated higher order maximum mean discrepancies.
Stochastic processes are random variables with values in some space of paths. However, reducing a stochastic process to a path-valued random variable ignores its filtration, i.e. the flow of information carried by the process through time. By conditioning the process on its filtration, we introduce a family of higher order kernel mean embeddings (KMEs) that generalizes the notion of KME to capture additional information related to the filtration. We derive empirical estimators for the associated higher order maximum mean discrepancies (MMDs) and prove consistency. We then construct a filtration-sensitive kernel two-sample test able to capture information that gets missed by the standard MMD test. In addition, leveraging our higher order MMDs we construct a family of universal kernels on stochastic processes that allows to solve real-world calibration and optimal stopping problems in quantitative finance (such as the pricing of American options) via classical kernel-based regression methods. Finally, adapting existing tests for conditional independence to the case of stochastic processes, we design a causal-discovery algorithm to recover the causal graph of structural dependencies among interacting bodies solely from observations of their multidimensional trajectories.
Diederik P Kingma, Tim Salimans, Ben Poole, Jonathan Ho
tl;dr: SOTA likelihood using diffusion models with learnable noise schedule
Diffusion-based generative models have demonstrated a capacity for perceptually impressive synthesis, but can they also be great likelihood-based models? We answer this in the affirmative, and introduce a family of diffusion-based generative models that obtain state-of-the-art likelihoods on standard image density estimation benchmarks. Unlike other diffusion-based models, our method allows for efficient optimization of the noise schedule jointly with the rest of the model. We show that the variational lower bound (VLB) simplifies to a remarkably short expression in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio of the diffused data, thereby improving our theoretical understanding of this model class. Using this insight, we prove an equivalence between several models proposed in the literature. In addition, we show that the continuous-time VLB is invariant to the noise schedule, except for the signal-to-noise ratio at its endpoints. This enables us to learn a noise schedule that minimizes the variance of the resulting VLB estimator, leading to faster optimization. Combining these advances with architectural improvements, we obtain state-of-the-art likelihoods on image density estimation benchmarks, outperforming autoregressive models that have dominated these benchmarks for many years, with often significantly faster optimization. In addition, we show how to use the model as part of a bits-back compression scheme, and demonstrate lossless compression rates close to the theoretical optimum.
Haoran Zhang, Quaid Morris, Berk Ustun, Marzyeh Ghassemi
tl;dr: We present an integer programming method to learn optimal checklists for classification tasks.
Checklists are simple decision aids that are often used to promote safety and reliability in clinical applications. In this paper, we present a method to learn checklists for clinical decision support. We represent predictive checklists as discrete linear classifiers with binary features and unit weights. We then learn globally optimal predictive checklists from data by solving an integer programming problem. Our method allows users to customize checklists to obey complex constraints, including constraints to enforce group fairness and to binarize real-valued features at training time. In addition, it pairs models with an optimality gap that can inform model development and determine the feasibility of learning sufficiently accurate checklists on a given dataset. We pair our method with specialized techniques that speed up its ability to train a predictive checklist that performs well and has a small optimality gap. We benchmark the performance of our method on seven clinical classification problems, and demonstrate its practical benefits by training a short-form checklist for PTSD screening. Our results show that our method can fit simple predictive checklists that perform well and that can easily be customized to obey a rich class of custom constraints.
Mina Ghadimi Atigh, Martin Keller-Ressel, Pascal Mettes
tl;dr: We introduce Hyperbolic Busemann learning with ideal prototypes. We position class prototypes on the ideal boundary of Poincare ball with penalized Bussmann loss, alleviating the need for prior knowledge.
Hyperbolic space has become a popular choice of manifold for representation learning of various datatypes from tree-like structures and text to graphs. Building on the success of deep learning with prototypes in Euclidean and hyperspherical spaces, a few recent works have proposed hyperbolic prototypes for classification. Such approaches enable effective learning in low-dimensional output spaces and can exploit hierarchical relations amongst classes, but require privileged information about class labels to position the hyperbolic prototypes. In this work, we propose Hyperbolic Busemann Learning. The main idea behind our approach is to position prototypes on the ideal boundary of the Poincar\'{e} ball, which does not require prior label knowledge. To be able to compute proximities to ideal prototypes, we introduce the penalised Busemann loss. We provide theory supporting the use of ideal prototypes and the proposed loss by proving its equivalence to logistic regression in the one-dimensional case. Empirically, we show that our approach provides a natural interpretation of classification confidence, while outperforming recent hyperspherical and hyperbolic prototype approaches.
Zimin Chen, Vincent Josua Hellendoorn, Pascal Lamblin, Petros Maniatis, Pierre-Antoine Manzagol, Daniel Tarlow, Subhodeep Moitra
tl;dr: A single graph-based architecture can be applied to 16 seemingly different ML4Code tasks and achieves great results.
Machine learning for understanding and editing source code has recently attracted significant interest, with many developments in new models, new code representations, and new tasks. This proliferation can appear disparate and disconnected, making each approach seemingly unique and incompatible, thus obscuring the core machine learning challenges and contributions. In this work, we demonstrate that the landscape can be significantly simplified by taking a general approach of mapping a graph to a sequence of tokens and pointers. Our main result is to show that 16 recently published tasks of different shapes can be cast in this form, based on which a single model architecture achieves near or above state-of-the-art results on nearly all tasks, outperforming custom models like code2seq and alternative generic models like Transformers. This unification further enables multi-task learning and a series of cross-cutting experiments about the importance of different modeling choices for code understanding and repair tasks. The full framework, called PLUR, is easily extensible to more tasks, and will be open-sourced (https://github.com/google-research/plur).
Boris Knyazev, Michal Drozdzal, Graham W. Taylor, Adriana Romero
tl;dr: We propose a benchmark and models for predicting parameters of diverse neural networks in a single forward pass using another network
Deep learning has been successful in automating the design of features in machine learning pipelines. However, the algorithms optimizing neural network parameters remain largely hand-designed and computationally inefficient. We study if we can use deep learning to directly predict these parameters by exploiting the past knowledge of training other networks. We introduce a large-scale dataset of diverse computational graphs of neural architectures - DeepNets-1M - and use it to explore parameter prediction on CIFAR-10 and ImageNet. By leveraging advances in graph neural networks, we propose a hypernetwork that can predict performant parameters in a single forward pass taking a fraction of a second, even on a CPU. The proposed model achieves surprisingly good performance on unseen and diverse networks. For example, it is able to predict all 24 million parameters of a ResNet-50 achieving a 60% accuracy on CIFAR-10. On ImageNet, top-5 accuracy of some of our networks approaches 50%. Our task along with the model and results can potentially lead to a new, more computationally efficient paradigm of training networks. Our model also learns a strong representation of neural architectures enabling their analysis.
Shantanu Gupta, Zachary Chase Lipton, David Childers
tl;dr: Efficiently estimate a target parameter by sequentially querying data sources, each of which returns a specific subset of the variables.
Researchers often face data fusion problems, where multiple data sources are available, each capturing a distinct subset of variables. While problem formulations typically take the data as given, in practice, data acquisition can be an ongoing process. In this paper, we introduce the problem of deciding, at each time, which data source to sample from. Our goal is to estimate a given functional of the parameters of a probabilistic model as efficiently as possible. We propose online moment selection (OMS), a framework in which structural assumptions are encoded as moment conditions. The optimal action at each step depends, in part, on the very moments that identify the functional of interest. Our algorithms balance exploration with choosing the best action as suggested by estimated moments. We propose two selection strategies: (1) explore-then-commit (ETC) and (2) explore-then-greedy (ETG), proving that both achieve zero asymptotic regret as assessed by MSE. We instantiate our setup for average treatment effect estimation, where structural assumptions are given by a causal graph and data sources include subsets of mediators, confounders, and instrumental variables.
Lingshen He, Yiming Dong, Yisen Wang, Dacheng Tao, Zhouchen Lin
Attention mechanism has shown great performance and efficiency in a lot of deep learning models, in which relative position encoding plays a crucial role. However, when introducing attention to manifolds, there is no canonical local coordinate system to parameterize neighborhoods. To address this issue, we propose an equivariant transformer to make our model agnostic to the orientation of local coordinate systems (\textit{i.e.}, gauge equivariant), which employs multi-head self-attention to jointly incorporate both position-based and content-based information. To enhance expressive ability, we adopt regular field of cyclic groups as feature fields in intermediate layers, and propose a novel method to parallel transport the feature vectors in these fields. In addition, we project the position vector of each point onto its local coordinate system to disentangle the orientation of the coordinate system in ambient space (\textit{i.e.}, global coordinate system), achieving rotation invariance. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to introduce gauge equivariance to self-attention, thus name our model Gauge Equivariant Transformer (GET), which can be efficiently implemented on triangle meshes. Extensive experiments show that GET achieves state-of-the-art performance on two common recognition tasks.
Colin Bredenberg, Benjamin S. H. Lyo, Eero P Simoncelli, Cristina Savin
tl;dr: We derive an unsupervised local synaptic plasticity rule that trains neural circuits online to infer latent structure from time-varying sensory stimuli.
Understanding how the brain constructs statistical models of the sensory world remains a longstanding challenge for computational neuroscience. Here, we derive an unsupervised local synaptic plasticity rule that trains neural circuits to infer latent structure from sensory stimuli via a novel loss function for approximate online Bayesian inference. The learning algorithm is driven by a local error signal computed between two factors that jointly contribute to neural activity: stimulus drive and internal predictions --- the network's 'impression' of the stimulus. Physiologically, we associate these two components with the basal and apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons, respectively. We show that learning can be implemented online, is capable of capturing temporal dependencies in continuous input streams, and generalizes to hierarchical architectures. Furthermore, we demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the algorithm is more data-efficient than a three-factor plasticity alternative, enabling it to learn statistics of high-dimensional, naturalistic inputs. Overall, the model provides a bridge from mechanistic accounts of synaptic plasticity to algorithmic descriptions of unsupervised probabilistic learning and inference.
Sami Abu-El-Haija, Hesham Mostafa, Marcel Nassar, Valentino Crespi, Greg Ver Steeg, Aram Galstyan
tl;dr: Framework for representing matrices symbolically and efficiently computing their SVD, training graph networks orders-of-magnitude than SOTA, yet shows competitive empirical test performance
Recent improvements in the performance of state-of-the-art (SOTA) methods for Graph Representational Learning (GRL) have come at the cost of significant computational resource requirements for training, e.g., for calculating gradients via backprop over many data epochs. Meanwhile, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) can find closed-form solutions to convex problems, using merely a handful of epochs. In this paper, we make GRL more computationally tractable for those with modest hardware. We design a framework that computes SVD of *implicitly* defined matrices, and apply this framework to several GRL tasks. For each task, we derive first-order approximation of a SOTA model, where we design (expensive-to-store) matrix $\mathbf{M}$ and train the model, in closed-form, via SVD of $\mathbf{M}$, without calculating entries of $\mathbf{M}$. By converging to a unique point in one step, and without calculating gradients, our models show competitive empirical test performance over various graphs such as article citation and biological interaction networks. More importantly, SVD can initialize a deeper model, that is architected to be non-linear almost everywhere, though behaves linearly when its parameters reside on a hyperplane, onto which SVD initializes. The deeper model can then be fine-tuned within only a few epochs. Overall, our algorithm trains hundreds of times faster than state-of-the-art methods, while competing on test empirical performance. We open-source our implementation at: https://github.com/samihaija/isvd
Lingshen He, Yuxuan Chen, Zhengyang Shen, Yiming Dong, Yisen Wang, Zhouchen Lin
Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have dominated the field of Computer Vision and achieved great success due to their built-in translation equivariance. Group equivariant CNNs (G-CNNs) that incorporate more equivariance can significantly improve the performance of conventional CNNs. However, G-CNNs are faced with two major challenges: \emph{spatial-agnostic problem} and \emph{expensive computational cost}. In this work, we propose a general framework of previous equivariant models, which includes G-CNNs and equivariant self-attention layers as special cases. Under this framework, we explicitly decompose the feature aggregation operation into a kernel generator and an encoder, and decouple the spatial and extra geometric dimensions in the computation. Therefore, our filters are essentially dynamic rather than being spatial-agnostic. We further show that our \emph{E}quivariant model is parameter \emph{E}fficient and computation \emph{E}fficient by complexity analysis, and also data \emph{E}fficient by experiments, so we call our model $E^4$-Net. Extensive experiments verify that our model can significantly improve previous works with smaller model size. Especially, under the setting of training on $1/5$ data of CIFAR10, our model improves G-CNNs by $5\%+$ accuracy, while using only $56\%$ parameters and $68\%$ FLOPs.
Clarice Poon, Gabriel Peyré
tl;dr: We show how to reformulate a wide range of nonsmooth optimisation problems into smooth bilevel problems which are amenable to standard solvers in smooth optimisation, in particular BFGS quasi-Newton methods.
Iteratively reweighted least square (IRLS) is a popular approach to solve sparsity-enforcing regression problems in machine learning. State of the art approaches are more efficient but typically rely on specific coordinate pruning schemes. In this work, we show how a surprisingly simple re-parametrization of IRLS, coupled with a bilevel resolution (instead of an alternating scheme) is able to achieve top performances on a wide range of sparsity (such as Lasso, group Lasso and trace norm regularizations), regularization strength (including hard constraints), and design matrices (ranging from correlated designs to differential operators). Similarly to IRLS, our method only involves linear systems resolutions, but in sharp contrast, corresponds to the minimization of a smooth function. Despite being non-convex, we show that there is no spurious minima and that saddle points are "ridable'', so that there always exists a descent direction. We thus advocate for the use of a BFGS quasi-Newton solver, which makes our approach simple, robust and efficient. We perform a numerical benchmark of the convergence speed of our algorithm against state of the art solvers for Lasso, group Lasso, trace norm and linearly constrained problems. These results highlight the versatility of our approach, removing the need to use different solvers depending on the specificity of the ML problem under study.
Olivier Veilleux, Malik Boudiaf, Pablo Piantanida, Ismail Ben Ayed
tl;dr: A realistic evaluation of transductive few-shot methods via Dirichlet-distributed class marginals, and a generalization of the mutual information loss based on alpha-divergences.
Transductive inference is widely used in few-shot learning, as it leverages the statistics of the unlabeled query set of a few-shot task, typically yielding substantially better performances than its inductive counterpart. The current few-shot benchmarks use perfectly class-balanced tasks at inference. We argue that such an artificial regularity is unrealistic, as it assumes that the marginal label probability of the testing samples is known and fixed to the uniform distribution. In fact, in realistic scenarios, the unlabeled query sets come with arbitrary and unknown label marginals. We introduce and study the effect of arbitrary class distributions within the query sets of few-shot tasks at inference, removing the class-balance artefact. Specifically, we model the marginal probabilities of the classes as Dirichlet-distributed random variables, which yields a principled and realistic sampling within the simplex. This leverages the current few-shot benchmarks, building testing tasks with arbitrary class distributions. We evaluate experimentally state-of-the-art transductive methods over 3 widely used data sets, and observe, surprisingly, substantial performance drops, even below inductive methods in some cases. Furthermore, we propose a generalization of the mutual-information loss, based on α-divergences, which can handle effectively class-distribution variations. Empirically, we show that our transductive α-divergence optimization outperforms state-of-the-art methods across several data sets, models and few-shot settings.
D. Khuê Lê-Huu, Karteek Alahari
tl;dr: This paper proposes a new class of CRF inference algorithms called Regularized Frank-Wolfe that includes existing algorithms, such as mean field or concave-convex procedure, as special cases.
We introduce regularized Frank-Wolfe, a general and effective algorithm for inference and learning of dense conditional random fields (CRFs). The algorithm optimizes a nonconvex continuous relaxation of the CRF inference problem using vanilla Frank-Wolfe with approximate updates, which are equivalent to minimizing a regularized energy function. Our proposed method is a generalization of existing algorithms such as mean field or concave-convex procedure. This perspective not only offers a unified analysis of these algorithms, but also allows an easy way of exploring different variants that potentially yield better performance. We illustrate this in our empirical results on standard semantic segmentation datasets, where several instantiations of our regularized Frank-Wolfe outperform mean field inference, both as a standalone component and as an end-to-end trainable layer in a neural network. We also show that dense CRFs, coupled with our new algorithms, produce significant improvements over strong CNN baselines.
Gongfan Fang, Yifan Bao, Jie Song, Xinchao Wang, Donglin Xie, Chengchao Shen, Mingli Song
Knowledge distillation~(KD) aims to craft a compact student model that imitates the behavior of a pre-trained teacher in a target domain. Prior KD approaches, despite their gratifying results, have largely relied on the premise that \emph{in-domain} data is available to carry out the knowledge transfer. Such an assumption, unfortunately, in many cases violates the practical setting, since the original training data or even the data domain is often unreachable due to privacy or copyright reasons. In this paper, we attempt to tackle an ambitious task, termed as \emph{out-of-domain} knowledge distillation~(OOD-KD), which allows us to conduct KD using only OOD data that can be readily obtained at a very low cost. Admittedly, OOD-KD is by nature a highly challenging task due to the agnostic domain gap. To this end, we introduce a handy yet surprisingly efficacious approach, dubbed as~\textit{MosaicKD}. The key insight behind MosaicKD lies in that, samples from various domains share common local patterns, even though their global semantic may vary significantly; these shared local patterns, in turn, can be re-assembled analogous to mosaic tiling, to approximate the in-domain data and to further alleviating the domain discrepancy. In MosaicKD, this is achieved through a four-player min-max game, in which a generator, a discriminator, a student network, are collectively trained in an adversarial manner, partially under the guidance of a pre-trained teacher. We validate MosaicKD over {classification and semantic segmentation tasks} across various benchmarks, and demonstrate that it yields results much superior to the state-of-the-art counterparts on OOD data. Our code is available at \url{https://github.com/zju-vipa/MosaicKD}.
Marin Biloš, Johanna Sommer, Syama Sundar Rangapuram, Tim Januschowski, Stephan Günnemann
tl;dr: We directly model the ODE solutions, which is much faster and achieves better results on time series applications.
Neural ordinary differential equations describe how values change in time. This is the reason why they gained importance in modeling sequential data, especially when the observations are made at irregular intervals. In this paper we propose an alternative by directly modeling the solution curves - the flow of an ODE - with a neural network. This immediately eliminates the need for expensive numerical solvers while still maintaining the modeling capability of neural ODEs. We propose several flow architectures suitable for different applications by establishing precise conditions on when a function defines a valid flow. Apart from computational efficiency, we also provide empirical evidence of favorable generalization performance via applications in time series modeling, forecasting, and density estimation.
Arya Akhavan, massimiliano pontil, Alexandre B Tsybakov
We study the problem of distributed zero-order optimization for a class of strongly convex functions. They are formed by the average of local objectives, associated to different nodes in a prescribed network. We propose a distributed zero-order projected gradient descent algorithm to solve the problem. Exchange of information within the network is permitted only between neighbouring nodes. An important feature of our procedure is that it can query only function values, subject to a general noise model, that does not require zero mean or independent errors. We derive upper bounds for the average cumulative regret and optimization error of the algorithm which highlight the role played by a network connectivity parameter, the number of variables, the noise level, the strong convexity parameter, and smoothness properties of the local objectives. The bounds indicate some key improvements of our method over the state-of-the-art, both in the distributed and standard zero-order optimization settings.
Max Ryabinin, Andrey Malinin, Mark Gales
tl;dr: We overcome unstable training and show how to scale Ensemble Distribution Distillation to classification tasks with arbitrary numbers of classes.
Ensembles of machine learning models yield improved system performance as well as robust and interpretable uncertainty estimates; however, their inference costs can be prohibitively high. Ensemble Distribution Distillation (EnD$^2$) is an approach that allows a single model to efficiently capture both the predictive performance and uncertainty estimates of an ensemble. For classification, this is achieved by training a Dirichlet distribution over the ensemble members' output distributions via the maximum likelihood criterion. Although theoretically principled, this work shows that the criterion exhibits poor convergence when applied to large-scale tasks where the number of classes is very high. Specifically, we show that for the Dirichlet log-likelihood criterion classes with low probability induce larger gradients than high-probability classes. Hence during training the model focuses on the distribution of the ensemble tail-class probabilities rather than the probability of the correct and closely related classes. We propose a new training objective which minimizes the reverse KL-divergence to a \emph{Proxy-Dirichlet} target derived from the ensemble. This loss resolves the gradient issues of EnD$^2$, as we demonstrate both theoretically and empirically on the ImageNet, LibriSpeech, and WMT17 En-De datasets containing 1000, 5000, and 40,000 classes, respectively.
Pablo Moreno-Muñoz, Antonio Artés, Mauricio A Álvarez
tl;dr: Framework for transfer learning based on modular variational Gaussian processes
We present a framework for transfer learning based on modular variational Gaussian processes (GP). We develop a module-based method that having a dictionary of well fitted GPs, each model being characterised by its hyperparameters, pseudo-inputs and their corresponding posterior densities, one could build ensemble GP models without revisiting any data. Our method avoids undesired data centralisation, reduces rising computational costs and allows the transfer of learned uncertainty metrics after training. We exploit the augmentation of high-dimensional integral operators based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence between stochastic processes to introduce an efficient lower bound under all the sparse variational GPs, with different complexity and even likelihood distribution. The method is also valid for multi-output GPs, learning correlations a posteriori between independent modules. Extensive results illustrate the usability of our framework in large-scale and multi-task experiments, also compared with the exact inference methods in the literature.
Yuchao Qin, Fergus Imrie, Alihan Hüyük, Daniel Jarrett, Alexander Edward Gimson, Mihaela van der Schaar
tl;dr: Desiderata for inverse decision-making approaches to understand clinical practice are highlighted, and a novel method, iTransplant, is proposed to learn a patient-wise parametrization of expert clinician policy to elucidate medical decision-making.
Significant effort has been placed on developing decision support tools to improve patient care. However, drivers of real-world clinical decisions in complex medical scenarios are not yet well-understood, resulting in substantial gaps between these tools and practical applications. In light of this, we highlight that more attention on understanding clinical decision-making is required both to elucidate current clinical practices and to enable effective human-machine interactions. This is imperative in high-stakes scenarios with scarce available resources. Using organ transplantation as a case study, we formalize the desiderata of methods for understanding clinical decision-making. We show that most existing machine learning methods are insufficient to meet these requirements and propose iTransplant, a novel data-driven framework to learn the factors affecting decisions on organ offers in an instance-wise fashion directly from clinical data, as a possible solution. Through experiments on real-world liver transplantation data from OPTN, we demonstrate the use of iTransplant to: (1) discover which criteria are most important to clinicians for organ offer acceptance; (2) identify patient-specific organ preferences of clinicians allowing automatic patient stratification; and (3) explore variations in transplantation practices between different transplant centers. Finally, we emphasize that the insights gained by iTransplant can be used to inform the development of future decision support tools.
Martin Klissarov, Doina Precup
tl;dr: We propose updates that allow for learning all relevant options simulteneously without introducing additional estimators. We verify that our approach can improve sample efficiency and can open the door to more flexibility when learning options.
Temporal abstraction in reinforcement learning (RL), offers the promise of improving generalization and knowledge transfer in complex environments, by propagating information more efficiently over time. Although option learning was initially formulated in a way that allows updating many options simultaneously, using off-policy, intra-option learning (Sutton, Precup & Singh, 1999) , many of the recent hierarchical reinforcement learning approaches only update a single option at a time: the option currently executing. We revisit and extend intra-option learning in the context of deep reinforcement learning, in order to enable updating all options consistent with current primitive action choices, without introducing any additional estimates. Our method can therefore be naturally adopted in most hierarchical RL frameworks. When we combine our approach with the option-critic algorithm for option discovery, we obtain significant improvements in performance and data-efficiency across a wide variety of domains.
Bashir Rastegarpanah, Krishna P. Gummadi, Mark Crovella
tl;dr: This paper proposes a new operational definition of the data minimization principle (eg, from GDPR) that is appropriate for auditing black-box prediction models, and develops efficient algorithms for that setting.
In this paper, we focus on auditing black-box prediction models for compliance with the GDPR’s data minimization principle. This principle restricts prediction models to use the minimal information that is necessary for performing the task at hand. Given the challenge of the black-box setting, our key idea is to check if each of the prediction model’s input features is individually necessary by assigning it some constant value (i.e., applying a simple imputation) across all prediction instances, and measuring the extent to which the model outcomes would change. We introduce a metric for data minimization that is based on model instability under simple imputations. We extend the applicability of this metric from a finite sample model to a distributional setting by introducing a probabilistic data minimization guarantee, which we derive using a Bayesian approach. Furthermore, we address the auditing problem under a constraint on the number of queries to the prediction system. We formulate the problem of allocating a budget of system queries to feasible simple imputations (for investigating model instability) as a multi-armed bandit framework with probabilistic success metrics. We define two bandit problems for providing a probabilistic data minimization guarantee at a given confidence level: a decision problem given a data minimization level, and a measurement problem given a fixed query budget. We design efficient algorithms for these auditing problems using novel exploration strategies that expand classical bandit strategies. Our experiments with real-world prediction systems show that our auditing algorithms significantly outperform simpler benchmarks in both measurement and decision problems.
Muhan Zhang, Pan Li, Yinglong Xia, Kai Wang, Long Jin
In this paper, we provide a theory of using graph neural networks (GNNs) for multi-node representation learning (where we are interested in learning a representation for a set of more than one node, such as link). We know that GNN is designed to learn single-node representations. When we want to learn a node set representation involving multiple nodes, a common practice in previous works is to directly aggregate the single-node representations obtained by a GNN into a joint node set representation. In this paper, we show a fundamental constraint of such an approach, namely the inability to capture the dependence between nodes in the node set, and argue that directly aggregating individual node representations does not lead to an effective joint representation for multiple nodes. Then, we notice that a few previous successful works for multi-node representation learning, including SEAL, Distance Encoding, and ID-GNN, all used node labeling. These methods first label nodes in the graph according to their relationships with the target node set before applying a GNN. Then, the node representations obtained in the labeled graph are aggregated into a node set representation. By investigating their inner mechanisms, we unify these node labeling techniques into a single and most general form---labeling trick. We prove that with labeling trick a sufficiently expressive GNN learns the most expressive node set representations, thus in principle solves any joint learning tasks over node sets. Experiments on one important two-node representation learning task, link prediction, verified our theory. Our work explains the superior performance of previous node-labeling-based methods, and establishes a theoretical foundation of using GNNs for multi-node representation learning.
Shuyu Cheng, Guoqiang Wu, Jun Zhu
tl;dr: We conduct convergence analysis on frameworks of ZO algorithms including existing prior-guided random gradient-free methods and a new prior-guided accelerated random search method.
Zeroth-order (ZO) optimization is widely used to handle challenging tasks, such as query-based black-box adversarial attacks and reinforcement learning. Various attempts have been made to integrate prior information into the gradient estimation procedure based on finite differences, with promising empirical results. However, their convergence properties are not well understood. This paper makes an attempt to fill up this gap by analyzing the convergence of prior-guided ZO algorithms under a greedy descent framework with various gradient estimators. We provide a convergence guarantee for the prior-guided random gradient-free (PRGF) algorithms. Moreover, to further accelerate over greedy descent methods, we present a new accelerated random search (ARS) algorithm that incorporates prior information, together with a convergence analysis. Finally, our theoretical results are confirmed by experiments on several numerical benchmarks as well as adversarial attacks.
Guandao Yang, Serge Belongie, Bharath Hariharan, Vladlen Koltun
tl;dr: Using neural fields for geometry processing can achieve good results while avoiding surface discretization.
Most existing geometry processing algorithms use meshes as the default shape representation. Manipulating meshes, however, requires one to maintain high quality in the surface discretization. For example, changing the topology of a mesh usually requires additional procedures such as remeshing. This paper instead proposes the use of neural fields for geometry processing. Neural fields can compactly store complicated shapes without spatial discretization. Moreover, neural fields are infinitely differentiable, which allows them to be optimized for objectives that involve higher-order derivatives. This raises the question: can geometry processing be done entirely using neural fields? We introduce loss functions and architectures to show that some of the most challenging geometry processing tasks, such as deformation and filtering, can be done with neural fields. Experimental results show that our methods are on par with the well-established mesh-based methods without committing to a particular surface discretization. Code is available at https://github.com/stevenygd/NFGP.
Krishnan Raghavan, Prasanna Balaprakash
tl;dr: We advance state of the art by introducing balanced continual learning to model the generalization-forgetting tradeoff as a two player sequential game.
We formulate the continual learning (CL) problem via dynamic programming and model the trade-off between catastrophic forgetting and generalization as a two-player sequential game. In this approach, player 1 maximizes the cost due to lack of generalization whereas player 2 minimizes the cost due to catastrophic forgetting. We show theoretically that a balance point between the two players exists for each task and that this point is stable (once the balance is achieved, the two players stay at the balance point). Next, we introduce balanced continual learning (BCL), which is designed to attain balance between generalization and forgetting and empirically demonstrate that BCL is comparable to or better than the state of the art.
Federico Lopez, Maria Beatrice Pozzetti, Steve J Trettel, Michael Strube, Anna Wienhard
tl;dr: We propose a framework to compute vector-valued distances and adapt Euclidean operations into the SPD manifold
We propose the use of the vector-valued distance to compute distances and extract geometric information from the manifold of symmetric positive definite matrices (SPD), and develop gyrovector calculus, constructing analogs of vector space operations in this curved space. We implement these operations and showcase their versatility in the tasks of knowledge graph completion, item recommendation, and question answering. In experiments, the SPD models outperform their equivalents in Euclidean and hyperbolic space. The vector-valued distance allows us to visualize embeddings, showing that the models learn to disentangle representations of positive samples from negative ones.
Yonghan Jung, Jin Tian, Elias Bareinboim
tl;dr: We develop double/debiased machine learning (DML) density estimators for treatment effects among compliers in the presence of instruments.
It is common to quantify causal effects with mean values, which, however, may fail to capture significant distribution differences of the outcome under different treatments. We study the problem of estimating the density of the causal effect of a binary treatment on a continuous outcome given a binary instrumental variable in the presence of covariates. Specifically, we consider the local treatment effect, which measures the effect of treatment among those who comply with the assignment under the assumption of monotonicity (only the ones who were offered the treatment take it). We develop two families of methods for this task, kernel-smoothing and model-based approximations -- the former smoothes the density by convoluting with a smooth kernel function; the latter projects the density onto a finite-dimensional density class. For both approaches, we derive double/debiased machine learning (DML) based estimators. We study the asymptotic convergence rates of the estimators and show that they are robust to the biases in nuisance function estimation. We illustrate the proposed methods on synthetic data and a real dataset called 401(k).
Bernd Illing, Jean Robin Ventura, Guillaume Bellec, Wulfram Gerstner
tl;dr: We propose a new local learning rule, inspired by neuroscience and self-supervised deep learning, and demonstrate that it can train deep neural networks on images, speech and video.
Learning in the brain is poorly understood and learning rules that respect biological constraints, yet yield deep hierarchical representations, are still unknown. Here, we propose a learning rule that takes inspiration from neuroscience and recent advances in self-supervised deep learning. Learning minimizes a simple layer-specific loss function and does not need to back-propagate error signals within or between layers. Instead, weight updates follow a local, Hebbian, learning rule that only depends on pre- and post-synaptic neuronal activity, predictive dendritic input and widely broadcasted modulation factors which are identical for large groups of neurons. The learning rule applies contrastive predictive learning to a causal, biological setting using saccades (i.e. rapid shifts in gaze direction). We find that networks trained with this self-supervised and local rule build deep hierarchical representations of images, speech and video.
Binxin Ru, Clare Lyle, Lisa Schut, Miroslav Fil, Mark van der Wilk, Yarin Gal
tl;dr: A simple, cheap, model-free yet reliable performance estimator for ranking architectures
Reliable yet efficient evaluation of generalisation performance of a proposed architecture is crucial to the success of neural architecture search (NAS). Traditional approaches face a variety of limitations: training each architecture to completion is prohibitively expensive, early stopped validation accuracy may correlate poorly with fully trained performance, and model-based estimators require large training sets. We instead propose to estimate the final test performance based on a simple measure of training speed. Our estimator is theoretically motivated by the connection between generalisation and training speed, and is also inspired by the reformulation of a PAC-Bayes bound under the Bayesian setting. Our model-free estimator is simple, efficient, and cheap to implement, and does not require hyperparameter-tuning or surrogate training before deployment. We demonstrate on various NAS search spaces that our estimator consistently outperforms other alternatives in achieving better correlation with the true test performance rankings. We further show that our estimator can be easily incorporated into both query-based and one-shot NAS methods to improve the speed or quality of the search.
Mandela Patrick, Dylan Campbell, Yuki Asano, Ishan Misra, Florian Metze, Christoph Feichtenhofer, Andrea Vedaldi, Joao F. Henriques
tl;dr: A new attention block for video transformers that implicitly models motion paths
In video transformers, the time dimension is often treated in the same way as the two spatial dimensions. However, in a scene where objects or the camera may move, a physical point imaged at one location in frame $t$ may be entirely unrelated to what is found at that location in frame $t+k$. These temporal correspondences should be modeled to facilitate learning about dynamic scenes. To this end, we propose a new drop-in block for video transformers - trajectory attention - that aggregates information along implicitly determined motion paths. We additionally propose a new method to address the quadratic dependence of computation and memory on the input size, which is particularly important for high resolution or long videos. While these ideas are useful in a range of settings, we apply them to the specific task of video action recognition with a transformer model and obtain state-of-the-art results on the Kinetics, Something-Something V2, and Epic-Kitchens datasets.
Luca Weihs, Unnat Jain, Iou-Jen Liu, Jordi Salvador, Svetlana Lazebnik, Aniruddha Kembhavi, Alex Schwing
tl;dr: Imitation learning can fail when the expert uses privileged information, we address this by combining imitation and reward-based reinforcement learning losses using dynamic weights.
In practice, imitation learning is preferred over pure reinforcement learning whenever it is possible to design a teaching agent to provide expert supervision. However, we show that when the teaching agent makes decisions with access to privileged information that is unavailable to the student, this information is marginalized during imitation learning, resulting in an "imitation gap" and, potentially, poor results. Prior work bridges this gap via a progression from imitation learning to reinforcement learning. While often successful, gradual progression fails for tasks that require frequent switches between exploration and memorization. To better address these tasks and alleviate the imitation gap we propose 'Adaptive Insubordination' (ADVISOR). ADVISOR dynamically weights imitation and reward-based reinforcement learning losses during training, enabling on-the-fly switching between imitation and exploration. On a suite of challenging tasks set within gridworlds, multi-agent particle environments, and high-fidelity 3D simulators, we show that on-the-fly switching with ADVISOR outperforms pure imitation, pure reinforcement learning, as well as their sequential and parallel combinations.
Ziming Zhang, Yun Yue, Guojun Wu, Yanhua Li, Haichong Zhang
tl;dr: SBO-RNN: Reformulating Recurrent Neural Networks via Stochastic Bilevel Optimization
In this paper we consider the training stability of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and propose a family of RNNs, namely SBO-RNN, that can be formulated using stochastic bilevel optimization (SBO). With the help of stochastic gradient descent (SGD), we manage to convert the SBO problem into an RNN where the feedforward and backpropagation solve the lower and upper-level optimization for learning hidden states and their hyperparameters, respectively. We prove that under mild conditions there is no vanishing or exploding gradient in training SBO-RNN. Empirically we demonstrate our approach with superior performance on several benchmark datasets, with fewer parameters, less training data, and much faster convergence. Code is available at https://zhang-vislab.github.io.
Yiheng Lin, Yang Hu, Guanya Shi, Haoyuan Sun, Guannan Qu, Adam Wierman
tl;dr: We show regret and competitive ratio for predictive control in linear time varying system via a new perturbation analysis.
We study predictive control in a setting where the dynamics are time-varying and linear, and the costs are time-varying and well-conditioned. At each time step, the controller receives the exact predictions of costs, dynamics, and disturbances for the future $k$ time steps. We show that when the prediction window $k$ is sufficiently large, predictive control is input-to-state stable and achieves a dynamic regret of $O(\lambda^k T)$, where $\lambda < 1$ is a positive constant. This is the first dynamic regret bound on the predictive control of linear time-varying systems. We also show a variation of predictive control obtains the first competitive bound for the control of linear time-varying systems: $1 + O(\lambda^k)$. Our results are derived using a novel proof framework based on a perturbation bound that characterizes how a small change to the system parameters impacts the optimal trajectory.
Buddhima Gamlath, Xinrui Jia, Adam Polak, Ola Svensson
tl;dr: We give near-tight algorithms for explainable k-medians and k-means clustering, improving the solution quality by polynomial factors compared to prior work.
We study the problem of explainable clustering in the setting first formalized by Dasgupta, Frost, Moshkovitz, and Rashtchian (ICML 2020). A $k$-clustering is said to be explainable if it is given by a decision tree where each internal node splits data points with a threshold cut in a single dimension (feature), and each of the $k$ leaves corresponds to a cluster. We give an algorithm that outputs an explainable clustering that loses at most a factor of $O(\log^2 k)$ compared to an optimal (not necessarily explainable) clustering for the $k$-medians objective, and a factor of $O(k \log^2 k)$ for the $k$-means objective. This improves over the previous best upper bounds of $O(k)$ and $O(k^2)$, respectively, and nearly matches the previous $\Omega(\log k)$ lower bound for $k$-medians and our new $\Omega(k)$ lower bound for $k$-means. The algorithm is remarkably simple. In particular, given an initial not necessarily explainable clustering in $\mathbb{R}^d$, it is oblivious to the data points and runs in time $O(dk \log^2 k)$, independent of the number of data points $n$. Our upper and lower bounds also generalize to objectives given by higher $\ell_p$-norms.
Athanasios Papadopoulos, Pawel Korus, Nasir Memon
tl;dr: We propose TNet, a novel multi-scale hard-attention architecture, in order to leverage high-resolution information without the unsustainable quadratic complexity to input scale.
Can we leverage high-resolution information without the unsustainable quadratic complexity to input scale? We propose Traversal Network (TNet), a novel multi-scale hard-attention architecture, which traverses image scale-space in a top-down fashion, visiting only the most informative image regions along the way. TNet offers an adjustable trade-off between accuracy and complexity, by changing the number of attended image locations. We compare our model against hard-attention baselines on ImageNet, achieving higher accuracy with less resources (FLOPs, processing time and memory). We further test our model on fMoW dataset, where we process satellite images of size up to $896 \times 896$ px, getting up to $2.5$x faster processing compared to baselines operating on the same resolution, while achieving higher accuracy as well. TNet is modular, meaning that most classification models could be adopted as its backbone for feature extraction, making the reported performance gains orthogonal to benefits offered by existing optimized deep models. Finally, hard-attention guarantees a degree of interpretability to our model's predictions, without any extra cost beyond inference.
Denys Rozumnyi, Martin R. Oswald, Vittorio Ferrari, Marc Pollefeys
tl;dr: We address the novel task of jointly reconstructing the 3D shape, texture, and motion of an object from a single motion-blurred image and its background.
We address the novel task of jointly reconstructing the 3D shape, texture, and motion of an object from a single motion-blurred image. While previous approaches address the deblurring problem only in the 2D image domain, our proposed rigorous modeling of all object properties in the 3D domain enables the correct description of arbitrary object motion. This leads to significantly better image decomposition and sharper deblurring results. We model the observed appearance of a motion-blurred object as a combination of the background and a 3D object with constant translation and rotation. Our method minimizes a loss on reconstructing the input image via differentiable rendering with suitable regularizers. This enables estimating the textured 3D mesh of the blurred object with high fidelity. Our method substantially outperforms competing approaches on several benchmarks for fast moving objects deblurring. Qualitative results show that the reconstructed 3D mesh generates high-quality temporal super-resolution and novel views of the deblurred object.
Andrea Zanette, Martin Wainwright, Emma Brunskill
tl;dr: Actor-critic methods can work in models that are more general than low-rank MDPs with minimax statistical efficiency and computational tractability.
Actor-critic methods are widely used in offline reinforcement learning practice, but are not so well-understood theoretically. We propose a new offline actor-critic algorithm that naturally incorporates the pessimism principle, leading to several key advantages compared to the state of the art. The algorithm can operate when the Bellman evaluation operator is closed with respect to the action value function of the actor's policies; this is a more general setting than the low-rank MDP model. Despite the added generality, the procedure is computationally tractable as it involves the solution of a sequence of second-order programs. We prove an upper bound on the suboptimality gap of the policy returned by the procedure that depends on the data coverage of any arbitrary, possibly data dependent comparator policy. The achievable guarantee is complemented with a minimax lower bound that is matching up to logarithmic factors.
Brian Brubach, Nathaniel Grammel, Will Ma, Aravind Srinivasan
Matching is one of the most fundamental and broadly applicable problems across many domains. In these diverse real-world applications, there is often a degree of uncertainty in the input which has led to the study of stochastic matching models. Here, each edge in the graph has a known, independent probability of existing derived from some prediction. Algorithms must probe edges to determine existence and match them irrevocably if they exist. Further, each vertex may have a patience constraint denoting how many of its neighboring edges can be probed. We present new ordered contention resolution schemes yielding improved approximation guarantees for some of the foundational problems studied in this area. For stochastic matching with patience constraints in general graphs, we provide a $0.382$-approximate algorithm, significantly improving over the previous best $0.31$-approximation of Baveja et al. (2018). When the vertices do not have patience constraints, we describe a $0.432$-approximate random order probing algorithm with several corollaries such as an improved guarantee for the Prophet Secretary problem under Edge Arrivals. Finally, for the special case of bipartite graphs with unit patience constraints on one of the partitions, we show a $0.632$-approximate algorithm that improves on the recent $1/3$-guarantee of Hikima et al. (2021).
Christopher Grimm, Andre Barreto, Gregory Farquhar, David Silver, Satinder Singh
tl;dr: We study model classes that have the same k-step Bellman updates as the environment, focus on a special case as k --> infty which we can closely connect with MuZero and use insights from for practical benefit.
One of the main challenges in model-based reinforcement learning (RL) is to decide which aspects of the environment should be modeled. The value-equivalence (VE) principle proposes a simple answer to this question: a model should capture the aspects of the environment that are relevant for value-based planning. Technically, VE distinguishes models based on a set of policies and a set of functions: a model is said to be VE to the environment if the Bellman operators it induces for the policies yield the correct result when applied to the functions. As the number of policies and functions increase, the set of VE models shrinks, eventually collapsing to a single point corresponding to a perfect model. A fundamental question underlying the VE principle is thus how to select the smallest sets of policies and functions that are sufficient for planning. In this paper we take an important step towards answering this question. We start by generalizing the concept of VE to order-$k$ counterparts defined with respect to $k$ applications of the Bellman operator. This leads to a family of VE classes that increase in size as $k \rightarrow \infty$. In the limit, all functions become value functions, and we have a special instantiation of VE which we call proper VE or simply PVE. Unlike VE, the PVE class may contain multiple models even in the limit when all value functions are used. Crucially, all these models are sufficient for planning, meaning that they will yield an optimal policy despite the fact that they may ignore many aspects of the environment. We construct a loss function for learning PVE models and argue that popular algorithms such as MuZero can be understood as minimizing an upper bound for this loss. We leverage this connection to propose a modification to MuZero and show that it can lead to improved performance in practice.
Akash Kumar, Yuxin Chen, Adish Singla
tl;dr: We study the sample complexity of teaching, termed as "teaching dimension" in the literature, for the learning-with-equivalence-queries paradigm.
We study the sample complexity of teaching, termed as "teaching dimension" (TD) in the literature, for the learning-with-equivalence-queries (LwEQ) paradigm. More concretely, we consider a learner who asks equivalence queries (i.e., "is the queried hypothesis the target hypothesis?"), and a teacher responds either "yes" or "no" along with a counterexample to the queried hypothesis. This learning paradigm has been extensively studied when the learner receives worst-case or random counterexamples; in this paper, we consider the optimal teacher who picks best-case counterexamples to teach the target hypothesis within a hypothesis class. For this optimal teacher, we introduce LwEQ-TD, a notion of TD capturing the teaching complexity (i.e., the number of queries made) in this paradigm. We show that a significant reduction in queries can be achieved with best-case counterexamples, in contrast to worst-case or random counterexamples, for different hypothesis classes. Furthermore, we establish new connections of LwEQ-TD to the well-studied notions of TD in the learning-from-samples paradigm.
Jinshuo Dong, Weijie J Su, Linjun Zhang
tl;dr: Adding even highly correlated noise to a high-dimensional query yields Gaussian Differential Privacy. Privacy-accuracy trade-off is related to Cramer-Rao lower bound.
Perhaps the single most important use case for differential privacy is to privately answer numerical queries, which is usually achieved by adding noise to the answer vector. The central question is, therefore, to understand which noise distribution optimizes the privacy-accuracy trade-off, especially when the dimension of the answer vector is high. Accordingly, an extensive literature has been dedicated to the question and the upper and lower bounds have been successfully matched up to constant factors (Bun et al., 2018; Steinke & Ullman, 2017). In this paper, we take a novel approach to address this important optimality question. We first demonstrate an intriguing central limit theorem phenomenon in the high-dimensional regime. More precisely, we prove that a mechanism is approximately Gaussian Differentially Private (Dong et al., 2021) if the added noise satisfies certain conditions. In particular, densities proportional to $\mathrm{e}^{-\|x\|_p^\alpha}$, where $\|x\|_p$ is the standard $\ell_p$-norm, satisfies the conditions. Taking this perspective, we make use of the Cramer--Rao inequality and show an "uncertainty principle"-style result: the product of privacy parameter and the $\ell_2$-loss of the mechanism is lower bounded by the dimension. Furthermore, the Gaussian mechanism achieves the constant-sharp optimal privacy-accuracy trade-off among all such noises. Our findings are corroborated by numerical experiments.
Zhen Dai, Mina Karzand, Nathan Srebro
For different parameterizations (mappings from parameters to predictors), we study the regularization cost in predictor space induced by $l_2$ regularization on the parameters (weights). We focus on linear neural networks as parameterizations of linear predictors. We identify the representation cost of certain sparse linear ConvNets and residual networks. In order to get a better understanding of how the architecture and parameterization affect the representation cost, we also study the reverse problem, identifying which regularizers on linear predictors (e.g., $l_p$ norms, group norms, the $k$-support-norm, elastic net) can be the representation cost induced by simple $l_2$ regularization, and designing the parameterizations that do so.
Yaofeng Desmond Zhong, Biswadip Dey, Amit Chakraborty
tl;dr: By introducing a differentiable contact model, this work extends the applicability of Lagrangian/Hamiltonian-inspired neural networks to enable the learning of hybrid dynamics.
The incorporation of appropriate inductive bias plays a critical role in learning dynamics from data. A growing body of work has been exploring ways to enforce energy conservation in the learned dynamics by encoding Lagrangian or Hamiltonian dynamics into the neural network architecture. These existing approaches are based on differential equations, which do not allow discontinuity in the states and thereby limit the class of systems one can learn. However, in reality, most physical systems, such as legged robots and robotic manipulators, involve contacts and collisions, which introduce discontinuities in the states. In this paper, we introduce a differentiable contact model, which can capture contact mechanics: frictionless/frictional, as well as elastic/inelastic. This model can also accommodate inequality constraints, such as limits on the joint angles. The proposed contact model extends the scope of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian neural networks by allowing simultaneous learning of contact and system properties. We demonstrate this framework on a series of challenging 2D and 3D physical systems with different coefficients of restitution and friction. The learned dynamics can be used as a differentiable physics simulator for downstream gradient-based optimization tasks, such as planning and control.
Silvio Lattanzi, Benjamin Moseley, Sergei Vassilvitskii, Yuyan Wang, Rudy Zhou
tl;dr: We study online correlation clustering with offline advice both theoretically and empirically.
In correlation clustering we are given a set of points along with recommendations whether each pair of points should be placed in the same cluster or into separate clusters. The goal cluster the points to minimize disagreements from the recommendations. We study the correlation clustering problem in the online setting., where points arrive one at a time, and upon arrival the algorithm must make an irrevocable cluster assignment decision. While the online version is natural, there is a simple lower bound that rules out any algorithm with a non-trivial competitive ratio. In this work we go beyond worst case analysis, and show that the celebrated Pivot algorithm performs well when given access to a small number of random samples from the input. Moreover, we prove that Pivot is robust to additional adversarial perturbations of the sample set in this setting. We conclude with an empirical analysis validating our theoretical findings.
Anji Liu, Guy Van den Broeck
tl;dr: We proposed tractable regularization techniques for Probabilistic Circuits.
Probabilistic Circuits (PCs) are a promising avenue for probabilistic modeling. They combine advantages of probabilistic graphical models (PGMs) with those of neural networks (NNs). Crucially, however, they are tractable probabilistic models, supporting efficient and exact computation of many probabilistic inference queries, such as marginals and MAP. Further, since PCs are structured computation graphs, they can take advantage of deep-learning-style parameter updates, which greatly improves their scalability. However, this innovation also makes PCs prone to overfitting, which has been observed in many standard benchmarks. Despite the existence of abundant regularization techniques for both PGMs and NNs, they are not effective enough when applied to PCs. Instead, we re-think regularization for PCs and propose two intuitive techniques, data softening and entropy regularization, that both take advantage of PCs' tractability and still have an efficient implementation as a computation graph. Specifically, data softening provides a principled way to add uncertainty in datasets in closed form, which implicitly regularizes PC parameters. To learn parameters from a softened dataset, PCs only need linear time by virtue of their tractability. In entropy regularization, the exact entropy of the distribution encoded by a PC can be regularized directly, which is again infeasible for most other density estimation models. We show that both methods consistently improve the generalization performance of a wide variety of PCs. Moreover, when paired with a simple PC structure, we achieved state-of-the-art results on 10 out of 20 standard discrete density estimation benchmarks. Open-source code and experiments are available at https://github.com/UCLA-StarAI/Tractable-PC-Regularization.
Guoqiang Wei, Cuiling Lan, Wenjun Zeng, Zhizheng Zhang, Zhibo Chen
Unsupervised domain adaptive classifcation intends to improve the classifcation performance on unlabeled target domain. To alleviate the adverse effect of domain shift, many approaches align the source and target domains in the feature space. However, a feature is usually taken as a whole for alignment without explicitly making domain alignment proactively serve the classifcation task, leading to sub-optimal solution. In this paper, we propose an effective Task-oriented Alignment (ToAlign) for unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA). We study what features should be aligned across domains and propose to make the domain alignment proactively serve classifcation by performing feature decomposition and alignment under the guidance of the prior knowledge induced from the classifcation task itself. Particularly, we explicitly decompose a feature in the source domain into a task-related/discriminative feature that should be aligned, and a task-irrelevant feature that should be avoided/ignored, based on the classifcation meta-knowledge. Extensive experimental results on various benchmarks (e.g., Offce-Home, Visda-2017, and DomainNet) under different domain adaptation settings demonstrate the effectiveness of ToAlign which helps achieve the state-of-the-art performance. The code is publicly available at https://github.com/microsoft/UDA.
Alexander Hoyle, Pranav Goel, Andrew Hian-Cheong, Denis Peskov, Jordan Lee Boyd-Graber, Philip Resnik
tl;dr: Yes, automated topic evaluation is broken.
Topic model evaluation, like evaluation of other unsupervised methods, can be contentious. However, the field has coalesced around automated estimates of topic coherence, which rely on the frequency of word co-occurrences in a reference corpus. Contemporary neural topic models surpass classical ones according to these metrics. At the same time, topic model evaluation suffers from a validation gap: automated coherence, developed for classical models, has not been validated using human experimentation for neural models. In addition, a meta-analysis of topic modeling literature reveals a substantial standardization gap in automated topic modeling benchmarks. To address the validation gap, we compare automated coherence with the two most widely accepted human judgment tasks: topic rating and word intrusion. To address the standardization gap, we systematically evaluate a dominant classical model and two state-of-the-art neural models on two commonly used datasets. Automated evaluations declare a winning model when corresponding human evaluations do not, calling into question the validity of fully automatic evaluations independent of human judgments.
Sahra Ghalebikesabi, Lucile Ter-Minassian, Karla DiazOrdaz, Christopher C. Holmes
tl;dr: We consider the formulation of neighbourhood reference distributions that improve the local interpretability of Shapley values.
Shapley values provide model agnostic feature attributions for model outcome at a particular instance by simulating feature absence under a global population distribution. The use of a global population can lead to potentially misleading results when local model behaviour is of interest. Hence we consider the formulation of neighbourhood reference distributions that improve the local interpretability of Shapley values. By doing so, we find that the Nadaraya-Watson estimator, a well-studied kernel regressor, can be expressed as a self-normalised importance sampling estimator. Empirically, we observe that Neighbourhood Shapley values identify meaningful sparse feature relevance attributions that provide insight into local model behaviour, complimenting conventional Shapley analysis. They also increase on-manifold explainability and robustness to the construction of adversarial classifiers.
Michaël Fanuel, Rémi Bardenet
tl;dr: Continuous Determinantal Point Processes can be estimated with statistical guarantees thanks to kernel methods.
Determinantal Point Process (DPPs) are statistical models for repulsive point patterns. Both sampling and inference are tractable for DPPs, a rare feature among models with negative dependence that explains their popularity in machine learning and spatial statistics. Parametric and nonparametric inference methods have been proposed in the finite case, i.e. when the point patterns live in a finite ground set. In the continuous case, only parametric methods have been investigated, while nonparametric maximum likelihood for DPPs -- an optimization problem over trace-class operators -- has remained an open question. In this paper, we show that a restricted version of this maximum likelihood (MLE) problem falls within the scope of a recent representer theorem for nonnegative functions in an RKHS. This leads to a finite-dimensional problem, with strong statistical ties to the original MLE. Moreover, we propose, analyze, and demonstrate a fixed point algorithm to solve this finite-dimensional problem. Finally, we also provide a controlled estimate of the correlation kernel of the DPP, thus providing more interpretability.
Jeff Pool, Chong Yu
tl;dr: N:M structured sparsity is accelerated on hardware but can fail to maintain accuracy in some cases, so we correct this accuracy loss with an offline channel permutation step.
We introduce channel permutations as a method to maximize the accuracy of N:M sparse networks. N:M sparsity requires N out of M consecutive elements to be zero and has been shown to maintain accuracy for many models and tasks with a simple prune and fine-tune workflow. By permuting weight matrices along their channel dimension and adjusting the surrounding layers appropriately, we demonstrate accuracy recovery for even small, parameter-efficient networks, without affecting inference run-time. We also present both a quality metric to simplify judging permutations as well as efficient methods to search for high-quality permutations, including two optimizations to escape local minima. Finally, we share an ablation study to show the importance of each part of our search algorithm, experimental results showing correlation between our quality metric and final network accuracy, improved sparse network accuracy using our techniques with insignificant overhead to training time, and the transformation of unstructured to structured sparse workloads. Code to use these techniques when generating a 2:4 sparse network is available at https://github.com/NVIDIA/apex/tree/master/apex/contrib/sparsity.
Binh Tang, David S. Matteson
Generative modeling of multivariate time series has remained challenging partly due to the complex, non-deterministic dynamics across long-distance timesteps. In this paper, we propose deep probabilistic methods that combine state-space models (SSMs) with transformer architectures. In contrast to previously proposed SSMs, our approaches use attention mechanism to model non-Markovian dynamics in the latent space and avoid recurrent neural networks entirely. We also extend our models to include several layers of stochastic variables organized in a hierarchy for further expressiveness. Compared to transformer models, ours are probabilistic, non-autoregressive, and capable of generating diverse long-term forecasts with uncertainty estimates. Extensive experiments show that our models consistently outperform competitive baselines on various tasks and datasets, including time series forecasting and human motion prediction.
Brian Hu Zhang, Tuomas Sandholm
In imperfect-information games, subgame solving is significantly more challenging than in perfect-information games, but in the last few years, such techniques have been developed. They were the key ingredient to the milestone of superhuman play in no-limit Texas hold'em poker. Current subgame-solving techniques analyze the entire common-knowledge closure of the player's current information set, that is, the smallest set of nodes within which it is common knowledge that the current node lies. While this is acceptable in games like poker where the common-knowledge closure is relatively small, many practical games have more complex information structure, which renders the common-knowledge closure impractically large to enumerate or even reasonably approximate. We introduce an approach that overcomes this obstacle, by instead working with only low-order knowledge. Our approach allows an agent, upon arriving at an infoset, to basically prune any node that is no longer reachable, thereby massively reducing the game tree size relative to the common-knowledge subgame. We prove that, as is, our approach can increase exploitability compared to the blueprint strategy. However, we develop three avenues by which safety can be guaranteed. First, safety is guaranteed if the results of subgame solves are incorporated back into the blueprint. Second, we provide a method where safety is achieved by limiting the infosets at which subgame solving is performed. Third, we prove that our approach, when applied at every infoset reached during play, achieves a weaker notion of equilibrium, which we coin affine equilibrium, and which may be of independent interest. We show that affine equilibria cannot be exploited by any Nash strategy of the opponent, so an opponent who wishes to exploit must open herself to counter-exploitation. Even without the safety-guaranteeing additions, experiments on medium-sized games show that our approach always reduced exploitability in practical games even when applied at every infoset, and a depth-limited version of it led to---to our knowledge---the first strong AI for the challenge problem dark chess.
Stefan O'Toole, Nir Lipovetzky, Miquel Ramirez, Adrian Pearce
tl;dr: We propose new width-based planning and learning algorithms which we apply over the Atari-2600 games.
We propose new width-based planning and learning algorithms inspired from a careful analysis of the design decisions made by previous width-based planners. The algorithms are applied over the Atari-2600 games and our best performing algorithm, Novelty guided Critical Path Learning (N-CPL), outperforms the previously introduced width-based planning and learning algorithms $\pi$-IW(1), $\pi$-IW(1)+ and $\pi$-HIW(n, 1). Furthermore, we present a taxonomy of the Atari-2600 games according to some of their defining characteristics. This analysis of the games provides further insight into the behaviour and performance of the algorithms introduced. Namely, for games with large branching factors, and games with sparse meaningful rewards, N-CPL outperforms $\pi$-IW, $\pi$-IW(1)+ and $\pi$-HIW(n, 1).
Yong Sheng Soh, Antonios Varvitsiotis
Given a data matrix $X\in \mathbb{R}_+^{m\times n}$ with non-negative entries, a Positive Semidefinite (PSD) factorization of $X$ is a collection of $r \times r$-dimensional PSD matrices $\{A_i\}$ and $\{B_j\}$ satisfying the condition $X_{ij}= \mathrm{tr}(A_i B_j)$ for all $\ i\in [m],\ j\in [n]$. PSD factorizations are fundamentally linked to understanding the expressiveness of semidefinite programs as well as the power and limitations of quantum resources in information theory. The PSD factorization task generalizes the Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) problem in which we seek a collection of $r$-dimensional non-negative vectors $\{a_i\}$ and $\{b_j\}$ satisfying $X_{ij}= a_i^T b_j$, for all $i\in [m],\ j\in [n]$ -- one can recover the latter problem by choosing matrices in the PSD factorization to be diagonal. The most widely used algorithm for computing NMFs of a matrix is the Multiplicative Update algorithm developed by Lee and Seung, in which non-negativity of the updates is preserved by scaling with positive diagonal matrices. In this paper, we describe a non-commutative extension of Lee-Seung's algorithm, which we call the Matrix Multiplicative Update (MMU) algorithm, for computing PSD factorizations. The MMU algorithm ensures that updates remain PSD by congruence scaling with the matrix geometric mean of appropriate PSD matrices, and it retains the simplicity of implementation that the multiplicative update algorithm for NMF enjoys. Building on the Majorization-Minimization framework, we show that under our update scheme the squared loss objective is non-increasing and fixed points correspond to critical points. The analysis relies on a Lieb's Concavity Theorem. Beyond PSD factorizations, we show that the MMU algorithm can be also used as a primitive to calculate block-diagonal PSD factorizations and tensor PSD factorizations. We demonstrate the utility of our method with experiments on real and synthetic data.
Sreenivas Gollapudi, Guru Guruganesh, Kostas Kollias, Pasin Manurangsi, Renato Paes Leme, Jon Schneider
tl;dr: We consider variants of the linear contextual bandit problem where we only receive the best arm as feedback.
We consider the following variant of contextual linear bandits motivated by routing applications in navigational engines and recommendation systems. We wish to learn a hidden $d$-dimensional value $w^*$. Every round, we are presented with a subset $\mathcal{X}_t \subseteq \mathbb{R}^d$ of possible actions. If we choose (i.e. recommend to the user) action $x_t$, we obtain utility $\langle x_t, w^* \rangle$ but only learn the identity of the best action $\arg\max_{x \in \X_t} \langle x, w^* \rangle$. We design algorithms for this problem which achieve regret $O(d\log T)$ and $\exp(O(d \log d))$. To accomplish this, we design novel cutting-plane algorithms with low “regret” -- the total distance between the true point $w^*$ and the hyperplanes the separation oracle returns. We also consider the variant where we are allowed to provide a list of several recommendations. In this variant, we give an algorithm with $O(d^2 \log d)$ regret and list size $\poly(d)$. Finally, we construct nearly tight algorithms for a weaker variant of this problem where the learner only learns the identity of an action that is better than the recommendation. Our results rely on new algorithmic techniques in convex geometry (including a variant of Steiner’s formula for the centroid of a convex set) which may be of independent interest.
Grisha Szep, Neil Dalchau, Attila Csikász-Nagy
tl;dr: A differentiable cost function creates bifurcations and matches them to target locations for differential equation models
Estimation of parameters in differential equation models can be achieved by applying learning algorithms to quantitative time-series data. However, sometimes it is only possible to measure qualitative changes of a system in response to a controlled condition. In dynamical systems theory, such change points are known as bifurcations and lie on a function of the controlled condition called the bifurcation diagram. In this work, we propose a gradient-based approach for inferring the parameters of differential equations that produce a user-specified bifurcation diagram. The cost function contains an error term that is minimal when the model bifurcations match the specified targets and a bifurcation measure which has gradients that push optimisers towards bifurcating parameter regimes. The gradients can be computed without the need to differentiate through the operations of the solver that was used to compute the diagram. We demonstrate parameter inference with minimal models which explore the space of saddle-node and pitchfork diagrams and the genetic toggle switch from synthetic biology. Furthermore, the cost landscape allows us to organise models in terms of topological and geometric equivalence.
Bingchen Zhao, Kai Han
tl;dr: A two-branch learning framework for discovering new categories on unlabelled data, by transferring knowledge from categories in labelled data with dual ranking statistics and mutual knowledge distillation.
In this paper, we tackle the problem of novel visual category discovery, i.e., grouping unlabelled images from new classes into different semantic partitions by leveraging a labelled dataset that contains images from other different but relevant categories. This is a more realistic and challenging setting than conventional semi-supervised learning. We propose a two-branch learning framework for this problem, with one branch focusing on local part-level information and the other branch focusing on overall characteristics. To transfer knowledge from the labelled data to the unlabelled, we propose using dual ranking statistics on both branches to generate pseudo labels for training on the unlabelled data. We further introduce a mutual knowledge distillation method to allow information exchange and encourage agreement between the two branches for discovering new categories, allowing our model to enjoy the benefits of global and local features. We comprehensively evaluate our method on public benchmarks for generic object classification, as well as the more challenging datasets for fine-grained visual recognition, achieving state-of-the-art performance.
Jakob Runge
tl;dr: The paper presents necessary and sufficient graphical conditions and an algorithm for optimal adjustment sets in causal graphical models with hidden variables.
The problem of selecting optimal backdoor adjustment sets to estimate causal effects in graphical models with hidden and conditioned variables is addressed. Previous work has defined optimality as achieving the smallest asymptotic estimation variance and derived an optimal set for the case without hidden variables. For the case with hidden variables there can be settings where no optimal set exists and currently only a sufficient graphical optimality criterion of limited applicability has been derived. In the present work optimality is characterized as maximizing a certain adjustment information which allows to derive a necessary and sufficient graphical criterion for the existence of an optimal adjustment set and a definition and algorithm to construct it. Further, the optimal set is valid if and only if a valid adjustment set exists and has higher (or equal) adjustment information than the Adjust-set proposed in Perkovi{\'c} et~al. [Journal of Machine Learning Research, 18: 1--62, 2018] for any graph. The results translate to minimal asymptotic estimation variance for a class of estimators whose asymptotic variance follows a certain information-theoretic relation. Numerical experiments indicate that the asymptotic results also hold for relatively small sample sizes and that the optimal adjustment set or minimized variants thereof often yield better variance also beyond that estimator class. Surprisingly, among the randomly created setups more than 90\% fulfill the optimality conditions indicating that also in many real-world scenarios graphical optimality may hold.
Lorenzo Noci, Gregor Bachmann, Kevin Roth, Sebastian Nowozin, Thomas Hofmann
tl;dr: We derive a precise characterization of the prior predictive distribution of deep ReLU networks using Meijer-G functions.
Recent works on Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) have highlighted the need to better understand the implications of using Gaussian priors in combination with the compositional structure of the network architecture. Similar in spirit to the kind of analysis that has been developed to devise better initialization schemes for neural networks (cf. He- or Xavier initialization), we derive a precise characterization of the prior predictive distribution of finite-width ReLU networks with Gaussian weights. While theoretical results have been obtained for their heavy-tailedness, the full characterization of the prior predictive distribution (i.e. its density, CDF and moments), remained unknown prior to this work. Our analysis, based on the Meijer-G function, allows us to quantify the influence of architectural choices such as the width or depth of the network on the resulting shape of the prior predictive distribution. We also formally connect our results to previous work in the infinite width setting, demonstrating that the moments of the distribution converge to those of a normal log-normal mixture in the infinite depth limit. Finally, our results provide valuable guidance on prior design: for instance, controlling the predictive variance with depth- and width-informed priors on the weights of the network.
Lorenzo Noci, Kevin Roth, Gregor Bachmann, Sebastian Nowozin, Thomas Hofmann
tl;dr: We provide novel and nuanced evidence relevant to existing explanations for the cold posterior effect, disentangling the roles of curation, data-augmentation and the prior.
The “cold posterior effect” (CPE) in Bayesian deep learning describes the disturbing observation that the predictive performance of Bayesian neural networks can be significantly improved if the Bayes posterior is artificially sharpened using a temperature parameter T <1. The CPE is problematic in theory and practice and since the effect was identified many researchers have proposed hypotheses to explain the phenomenon. However, despite this intensive research effort the effect remains poorly understood. In this work we provide novel and nuanced evidence relevant to existing explanations for the cold posterior effect, disentangling three hypotheses: 1. The dataset curation hypothesis of Aitchison (2020): we show empirically that the CPE does not arise in a real curated data set but can be produced in a controlled experiment with varying curation strength. 2. The data augmentation hypothesis of Izmailov et al. (2021) and Fortuin et al. (2021): we show empirically that data augmentation is sufficient but not necessary for the CPE to be present. 3. The bad prior hypothesis of Wenzel et al. (2020): we use a simple experiment evaluating the relative importance of the prior and the likelihood, strongly linking the CPE to the prior. Our results demonstrate how the CPE can arise in isolation from synthetic curation, data augmentation, and bad priors. Cold posteriors observed “in the wild” are therefore unlikely to arise from a single simple cause; as a result, we do not expect a simple “fix” for cold posteriors.
Yongyi Guo, Dominic Coey, Mikael Konutgan, Wenting Li, Chris Schoener, Matt Goldman
tl;dr: We show how to use supervised ML methods to substantially increase precision in experimental causal inference.
We consider the problem of variance reduction in randomized controlled trials, through the use of covariates correlated with the outcome but independent of the treatment. We propose a machine learning regression-adjusted treatment effect estimator, which we call MLRATE. MLRATE uses machine learning predictors of the outcome to reduce estimator variance. It employs cross-fitting to avoid overfitting biases, and we prove consistency and asymptotic normality under general conditions. MLRATE is robust to poor predictions from the machine learning step: if the predictions are uncorrelated with the outcomes, the estimator performs asymptotically no worse than the standard difference-in-means estimator, while if predictions are highly correlated with outcomes, the efficiency gains are large. In A/A tests, for a set of 48 outcome metrics commonly monitored in Facebook experiments, the estimator has over $70\%$ lower variance than the simple difference-in-means estimator, and about $19\%$ lower variance than the common univariate procedure which adjusts only for pre-experiment values of the outcome.
Mohammad Bashiri, Edgar Y. Walker, Konstantin-Klemens Lurz, Akshay Kumar Jagadish, Taliah Muhammad, Zhiwei Ding, Zhuokun Ding, Andreas S. Tolias, Fabian H. Sinz
tl;dr: We present a simple-to-train, yet flexible, flow-based generative model of neural population responses that successfully accounts for stimulus-driven responses and noise correlations.
We present a joint deep neural system identification model for two major sources of neural variability: stimulus-driven and stimulus-conditioned fluctuations. To this end, we combine (1) state-of-the-art deep networks for stimulus-driven activity and (2) a flexible, normalizing flow-based generative model to capture the stimulus-conditioned variability including noise correlations. This allows us to train the model end-to-end without the need for sophisticated probabilistic approximations associated with many latent state models for stimulus-conditioned fluctuations. We train the model on the responses of thousands of neurons from multiple areas of the mouse visual cortex to natural images. We show that our model outperforms previous state-of-the-art models in predicting the distribution of neural population responses to novel stimuli, including shared stimulus-conditioned variability. Furthermore, it successfully learns known latent factors of the population responses that are related to behavioral variables such as pupil dilation, and other factors that vary systematically with brain area or retinotopic location. Overall, our model accurately accounts for two critical sources of neural variability while avoiding several complexities associated with many existing latent state models. It thus provides a useful tool for uncovering the interplay between different factors that contribute to variability in neural activity.
Scott Pesme, Loucas Pillaud-Vivien, Nicolas Flammarion
tl;dr: Our paper deals with the implicit bias of SGD for diagonal linear networks.
Understanding the implicit bias of training algorithms is of crucial importance in order to explain the success of overparametrised neural networks. In this paper, we study the dynamics of stochastic gradient descent over diagonal linear networks through its continuous time version, namely stochastic gradient flow. We explicitly characterise the solution chosen by the stochastic flow and prove that it always enjoys better generalisation properties than that of gradient flow.Quite surprisingly, we show that the convergence speed of the training loss controls the magnitude of the biasing effect: the slower the convergence, the better the bias. To fully complete our analysis, we provide convergence guarantees for the dynamics. We also give experimental results which support our theoretical claims. Our findings highlight the fact that structured noise can induce better generalisation and they help explain the greater performances of stochastic gradient descent over gradient descent observed in practice.
Feng Zhu, Andrew R Sedler, Harrison A Grier, Nauman Ahad, Mark A. Davenport, Matthew Kaufman, Andrea Giovannucci, Chethan Pandarinath
tl;dr: We develop a novel learning rule for backpropagating loss in neuroscientific time series data with intermittent sampling, enabling sequential autoencoders to increase spatiotemporal resolution in electrophysiology and calcium imaging datasets.
Modern neural interfaces allow access to the activity of up to a million neurons within brain circuits. However, bandwidth limits often create a trade-off between greater spatial sampling (more channels or pixels) and the temporal frequency of sampling. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain spatio-temporal super-resolution in neuronal time series by exploiting relationships among neurons, embedded in latent low-dimensional population dynamics. Our novel neural network training strategy, selective backpropagation through time (SBTT), enables learning of deep generative models of latent dynamics from data in which the set of observed variables changes at each time step. The resulting models are able to infer activity for missing samples by combining observations with learned latent dynamics. We test SBTT applied to sequential autoencoders and demonstrate more efficient and higher-fidelity characterization of neural population dynamics in electrophysiological and calcium imaging data. In electrophysiology, SBTT enables accurate inference of neuronal population dynamics with lower interface bandwidths, providing an avenue to significant power savings for implanted neuroelectronic interfaces. In applications to two-photon calcium imaging, SBTT accurately uncovers high-frequency temporal structure underlying neural population activity, substantially outperforming the current state-of-the-art. Finally, we demonstrate that performance could be further improved by using limited, high-bandwidth sampling to pretrain dynamics models, and then using SBTT to adapt these models for sparsely-sampled data.
Muzammal Naseer, Kanchana Ranasinghe, Salman Khan, Munawar Hayat, Fahad Khan, Ming-Hsuan Yang
tl;dr: Analysis of content-dependent long-range interaction modeling capabilities of Vision Transformers in terms of robustness against image nuisances such as severe occlusions, domain shifts, spatial permutations, adversarial and natural perturbations.
Vision transformers (ViT) have demonstrated impressive performance across numerous machine vision tasks. These models are based on multi-head self-attention mechanisms that can flexibly attend to a sequence of image patches to encode contextual cues. An important question is how such flexibility (in attending image-wide context conditioned on a given patch) can facilitate handling nuisances in natural images e.g., severe occlusions, domain shifts, spatial permutations, adversarial and natural perturbations. We systematically study this question via an extensive set of experiments encompassing three ViT families and provide comparisons with a high-performing convolutional neural network (CNN). We show and analyze the following intriguing properties of ViT: (a)Transformers are highly robust to severe occlusions, perturbations and domain shifts, e.g., retain as high as 60% top-1 accuracy on ImageNet even after randomly occluding 80% of the image content. (b)The robustness towards occlusions is not due to texture bias, instead we show that ViTs are significantly less biased towards local textures, compared to CNNs. When properly trained to encode shape-based features, ViTs demonstrate shape recognition capability comparable to that of human visual system, previously unmatched in the literature. (c)Using ViTs to encode shape representation leads to an interesting consequence of accurate semantic segmentation without pixel-level supervision. (d)Off-the-shelf features from a single ViT model can be combined to create a feature ensemble, leading to high accuracy rates across a range of classification datasets in both traditional and few-shot learning paradigms. We show effective features of ViTs are due to flexible and dynamic receptive fields possible via self-attention mechanisms. Our code will be publicly released.
Andreea Deac, Petar Veličković, Ognjen Milinković, Pierre-Luc Bacon, Jian Tang, Mladen Nikolic
tl;dr: We study value iteration-based implicit planning methods, discover an algorithmic bottleneck which leaves them vulnerable in low-data scenarios. By performing value iteration-style planing in the latent space, we successfully break this bottleneck.
Implicit planning has emerged as an elegant technique for combining learned models of the world with end-to-end model-free reinforcement learning. We study the class of implicit planners inspired by value iteration, an algorithm that is guaranteed to yield perfect policies in fully-specified tabular environments. We find that prior approaches either assume that the environment is provided in such a tabular form---which is highly restrictive---or infer "local neighbourhoods" of states to run value iteration over---for which we discover an algorithmic bottleneck effect. This effect is caused by explicitly running the planning algorithm based on scalar predictions in every state, which can be harmful to data efficiency if such scalars are improperly predicted. We propose eXecuted Latent Value Iteration Networks (XLVINs), which alleviate the above limitations. Our method performs all planning computations in a high-dimensional latent space, breaking the algorithmic bottleneck. It maintains alignment with value iteration by carefully leveraging neural graph-algorithmic reasoning and contrastive self-supervised learning. Across seven low-data settings---including classical control, navigation and Atari---XLVINs provide significant improvements to data efficiency against value iteration-based implicit planners, as well as relevant model-free baselines. Lastly, we empirically verify that XLVINs can closely align with value iteration.
Desi R. Ivanova, Adam Foster, Steven Kleinegesse, Michael U. Gutmann, Tom Rainforth
tl;dr: A new policy-based method for performing Bayesian experimental design with implicit models that does not require heavy computations during the experiment, opening the door to running adaptive experiments in real time.
We introduce implicit Deep Adaptive Design (iDAD), a new method for performing adaptive experiments in real-time with implicit models. iDAD amortizes the cost of Bayesian optimal experimental design (BOED) by learning a design policy network upfront, which can then be deployed quickly at the time of the experiment. The iDAD network can be trained on any model which simulates differentiable samples, unlike previous design policy work that requires a closed form likelihood and conditionally independent experiments. At deployment, iDAD allows design decisions to be made in milliseconds, in contrast to traditional BOED approaches that require heavy computation during the experiment itself. We illustrate the applicability of iDAD on a number of experiments, and show that it provides a fast and effective mechanism for performing adaptive design with implicit models.
Yury Gorishniy, Ivan Rubachev, Valentin Khrulkov, Artem Babenko
tl;dr: Compared many DL models for tabular data, identified a strong baseline (ResNet) and proposed a powerful Transformer-based model.
The existing literature on deep learning for tabular data proposes a wide range of novel architectures and reports competitive results on various datasets. However, the proposed models are usually not properly compared to each other and existing works often use different benchmarks and experiment protocols. As a result, it is unclear for both researchers and practitioners what models perform best. Additionally, the field still lacks effective baselines, that is, the easy-to-use models that provide competitive performance across different problems. In this work, we perform an overview of the main families of DL architectures for tabular data and raise the bar of baselines in tabular DL by identifying two simple and powerful deep architectures. The first one is a ResNet-like architecture which turns out to be a strong baseline that is often missing in prior works. The second model is our simple adaptation of the Transformer architecture for tabular data, which outperforms other solutions on most tasks. Both models are compared to many existing architectures on a diverse set of tasks under the same training and tuning protocols. We also compare the best DL models with Gradient Boosted Decision Trees and conclude that there is still no universally superior solution. The source code is available at https://github.com/yandex-research/rtdl.
Jianyu Xu, Yu-Xiang Wang
tl;dr: We present algorithms that guarantees logarithmic (minimax) regrets in both stochastic and adversarial feature-based dynamic pricing problems with market noises.
Feature-based dynamic pricing is an increasingly popular model of setting prices for highly differentiated products with applications in digital marketing, online sales, real estate and so on. The problem was formally studied as an online learning problem [Javanmard & Nazerzadeh, 2019] where a seller needs to propose prices on the fly for a sequence of $T$ products based on their features $x$ while having a small regret relative to the best ---"omniscient"--- pricing strategy she could have come up with in hindsight. We revisit this problem and provide two algorithms (EMLP and ONSP) for stochastic and adversarial feature settings, respectively, and prove the optimal $O(d\log{T})$ regret bounds for both. In comparison, the best existing results are $O\left(\min\left\{\frac{1}{\lambda_{\min}^2}\log{T}, \sqrt{T}\right\}\right)$ and $O(T^{2/3})$ respectively, with $\lambda_{\min}$ being the smallest eigenvalue of $\mathbb{E}[xx^T]$ that could be arbitrarily close to $0$. We also prove an $\Omega(\sqrt{T})$ information-theoretic lower bound for a slightly more general setting, which demonstrates that "knowing-the-demand-curve" leads to an exponential improvement in feature-based dynamic pricing.
Victor Garcia Satorras, Emiel Hoogeboom, Fabian Bernd Fuchs, Ingmar Posner, Max Welling
This paper introduces a generative model equivariant to Euclidean symmetries: E(n) Equivariant Normalizing Flows (E-NFs). To construct E-NFs, we take the discriminative E(n) graph neural networks and integrate them as a differential equation to obtain an invertible equivariant function: a continuous-time normalizing flow. We demonstrate that E-NFs considerably outperform baselines and existing methods from the literature on particle systems such as DW4 and LJ13, and on molecules from QM9 in terms of log-likelihood. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first flow that jointly generates molecule features and positions in 3D.
Yiqin Yang, Xiaoteng Ma, Chenghao Li, Zewu Zheng, Qiyuan Zhang, Gao Huang, Jun Yang, Qianchuan Zhao
tl;dr: The first study analyzing and addressing the extrapolation error in multi-agent reinforcement learning.
Learning from datasets without interaction with environments (Offline Learning) is an essential step to apply Reinforcement Learning (RL) algorithms in real-world scenarios. However, compared with the single-agent counterpart, offline multi-agent RL introduces more agents with the larger state and action space, which is more challenging but attracts little attention. We demonstrate current offline RL algorithms are ineffective in multi-agent systems due to the accumulated extrapolation error. In this paper, we propose a novel offline RL algorithm, named Implicit Constraint Q-learning (ICQ), which effectively alleviates the extrapolation error by only trusting the state-action pairs given in the dataset for value estimation. Moreover, we extend ICQ to multi-agent tasks by decomposing the joint-policy under the implicit constraint. Experimental results demonstrate that the extrapolation error is successfully controlled within a reasonable range and insensitive to the number of agents. We further show that ICQ achieves the state-of-the-art performance in the challenging multi-agent offline tasks (StarCraft II). Our code is public online at https://github.com/YiqinYang/ICQ.
Lukas Braun, Tim P. Vogels
Neuronal computations depend on synaptic connectivity and intrinsic electrophysiological properties. Synaptic connectivity determines which inputs from presynaptic neurons are integrated, while cellular properties determine how inputs are filtered over time. Unlike their biological counterparts, most computational approaches to learning in simulated neural networks are limited to changes in synaptic connectivity. However, if intrinsic parameters change, neural computations are altered drastically. Here, we include the parameters that determine the intrinsic properties, e.g., time constants and reset potential, into the learning paradigm. Using sparse feedback signals that indicate target spike times, and gradient-based parameter updates, we show that the intrinsic parameters can be learned along with the synaptic weights to produce specific input-output functions. Specifically, we use a teacher-student paradigm in which a randomly initialised leaky integrate-and-fire or resonate-and-fire neuron must recover the parameters of a teacher neuron. We show that complex temporal functions can be learned online and without backpropagation through time, relying on event-based updates only. Our results are a step towards online learning of neural computations from ungraded and unsigned sparse feedback signals with a biologically inspired learning mechanism.
Bryn Elesedy
tl;dr: Strict generalisation benefit for invariance in kernel ridge regression
It is a commonly held belief that enforcing invariance improves generalisation. Although this approach enjoys widespread popularity, it is only very recently that a rigorous theoretical demonstration of this benefit has been established. In this work we build on the function space perspective of Elesedy and Zaidi [8] to derive a strictly non-zero generalisation benefit of incorporating invariance in kernel ridge regression when the target is invariant to the action of a compact group. We study invariance enforced by feature averaging and find that generalisation is governed by a notion of effective dimension that arises from the interplay between the kernel and the group. In building towards this result, we find that the action of the group induces an orthogonal decomposition of both the reproducing kernel Hilbert space and its kernel, which may be of interest in its own right.